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You are here: Home > Local Plans > Policy Documents > Mole Valley Core Strategy - Chapter 7 How the Strategy will be Delivered

Chapter 7 How the Strategy will be Delivered

7.0.1 In line with the Vision for Mole Valley, the objectives of the Core Strategy will be delivered 'in a way that is sustainable, minimises significant harmful change to its distinctive character, environment and feel, and mitigates its impact on the causes of climate change. The District's natural, built and historic environment will be safeguarded and enhanced and communities will have safe, convenient and sustainable access to the services and facilities they require'. Chapters 2 and3 set out the issues, goals and delivery requirements for Mole Valley. The key means of delivering the Core Strategy (where not already discussed in preceding sections) are through the provision of sufficient infrastructure, services and facilities; through the improvement of transport options and accessibility; through ensuring development is sustainability constructed and communities are safe; and, through the monitoring and managing of the policy outcomes. The following table brings together the goals identified in Chapter 2 and through an analysis of the District profile, policy context Sustainability Appraisal work and the Vision, establishes spatial objectives to be achieved for each area. This is then followed by the Core Strategy policies.

Table 7.1

Goals

Spatial Objectives

How will the Strategy be Delivered? (Policies)

  • To ensure the efficient use of existing infrastructure, reducing demands on infrastructure by promoting behavioural change and ensuring the delivery of additional capacity by extending or providing new infrastructure.
  • To ensure the adequate and timely provision of infrastructure, services and community facilities to accompany new development
  • To seek to address any identified existing deficiencies in provision.
  • To safeguard existing services and facilities.

Adequate Infrastructure, Services and Community Facilities (CS17)

  • To manage down traffic growth and encourage more sustainable transport choices by improving travel options and accessibility.
  • To seek to improve or at least retain access to services, particularly in rural areas.
  • To work in partnership to tackle the causes of peak hour traffic congestion.
  • To provide for development in locations which are accessible without total
    reliance on the private car.

Improved travel options
and accessibility (CS18)

  • To use natural resources wisely, reduce emissions that contribute to climate change and minimise the risk to communities from the effects of climate change.
  • To require development to reduce its impact on the climate and environment through use of sustainable construction methods and materials.
  • To maximise energy from renewable resources.
  • To minimise the risk to people and property from flooding, particularly from fluvial and surface water flooding.
  • To minimise the risk of and from pollution.

Sustainable Construction, Renewable Energy and Energy Conservation (CS19)

Reduced Flood Risk and Environmental Pollution (CS20)

7.0.2 It should be noted that the issue of transport and accessibility is particularly cross-cutting and runs through many of the themes and policies within the Core Strategy, particularly the work on the location of future development.

7.0.3 The outcomes and effects of the Core Strategy will be monitored in order to ensure that policies are working as anticipated, that development is being delivered as expected and that the key characteristics of the District are being retained and enhanced. In a similar way to the Sustainability Appraisal work, monitoring underlies the whole Core Strategy preparation, should significant deviations from the anticipated outcomes of policies be observed a review of part or all of the Core Strategy, or the preparation of other Local Development Documents may be required.

7.1 Adequate Infrastructure, Services and Community Facilities

Adequate Infrastructure Services and Facilities

7.1.1 The timely provision of infrastructure, maximising efficiency, reducing demand and ensuring there is adequate investment, is a key component of delivering a sustainable spatial strategy. For the purposes of this Core Strategy, infrastructure covers a range of services and facilities, including community facilities, provided by public and private bodies (See Community Facilities and Infrastructure Requirements: Position Statement). There is a growing concern that the provision and quality of infrastructure has not kept pace with housing development in Mole Valley. This can be mostly attributed to the continued development of housing on small sites within the District, resulting in a gradual cumulative impact. Due to the small-scale of development sites, rarely is a new piece of infrastructure required or facility funded solely through a single development proposal or built on site.

7.1.2 The timely provision of infrastructure is promoted in the South East Plan through the better use of existing infrastructure; reducing demand by promoting behavioural change; and, providing additional capacity by extending or providing new infrastructure. It highlights the need to ensure a co-ordinated approach to infrastructure management and investment.

7.1.3 Therefore in accordance with the South East Plan, the strategy is to optimise existing infrastructure; to reduce demand by promoting behavioural change (e.g. through e.g. water efficiency savings, travel demand management); and, to seek new infrastructure where required. The Council will also resist the loss of existing facilities and services and safeguard land identified for future infrastructure enhancements.

7.1.4 In order to fully understand how this strategy can be achieved the Council has, and will continue to, work in partnership with other authorities, agencies, utility companies, health service providers and private sector partners. The initial element of this work was the preparation of a Community Facilities and Infrastructure Requirements Position Statement. This 'living' document identifies levels of existing infrastructure, where known outlines measures that may help to reduce the demand and highlights any priorities for additional infrastructure capacity. This ensures that where priorities for additional infrastructure are identified, parties are aware at an early stage. It also provides an opportunity to allocate land if required through the Land Allocations or any subsequent Development Plan Document. In addition, to help ensure that the cumulative effect of development is not to the detriment of the existing community the Council requires developers to contribute, through a tariff approach, each time a site is developed. These approaches are regarded as the most effective way of funding any necessary supporting infrastructure.

7.1.5 As well as ensuring additional provision, the Council will also need to resist the loss of existing services and community facilities in order to maintain a good range. In addition, it will seek to safeguard any land identified for future needs. At present land is safeguarded for improvements to the A24 between Horsham and Capel. This includes the stretch of land between Clarke's Green, Capel and the county boundary. In addition a small piece of land adjacent to Gatwick Airport is safeguarded as identified in the Gatwick Airport Masterplan. These areas are identified on the Proposals Map.

Policy CS 17
Infrastructure, Services and Community Facilities

  1. Infrastructure delivery will be sought in accordance with the South East Plan Policy CC7: Infrastructure and Implementation.
  2. Subject to viability contributions will be required towards the overall cost of providing infrastructure each time a dwelling or commercial site is developed through the implementation of the development tariff (See Key Pieces of Evidence), until such time as this is superseded by the Community Infrastructure Levy.
  3. The Council will resist the loss of key services and facilities (including community facilities), unless an appropriate alternative is provided or, evidence is presented that the facility is no longer required and suitable alternative uses have been considered. This will require the developer to provide evidence that they have consulted with an appropriate range of service providers and the community where relevant.
  4. The Council will support the development of new infrastructure where required and will safeguard land for infrastructure if identified by the Council and other service providers.

7.1.6 The Council is mindful of the need to ensure that housing development proposals, where suitable, are also viable. In this regard, the Council will negotiate with applicants / builders who cite non-viability as the reason for not complying fully with the requirements to provide developer contributions. However, the case must be supported by financial evidence to be submitted with the planning application. Applicants must also be aware of the separate requirements relating to the provision of affordable housing (Policy CS4).

7.1.7 The legislative detail regarding the introduction and implementation of the Community Infrastructure Levy is, at the time of preparing this Core Strategy, still being refined by Government. Only once this is finalised will the Council be able to give a firmer indication of the timetable for its implementation within Mole Valley.

The policy will be delivered through:

  • The Planning Obligations and Infrastructure Provision Code of Practice until superseded by the Community Infrastructure Levy.
  • The Community Facilities and Infrastructure Requirements: Position Statement will be reviewed and updated as necessary to provide an up to date picture of the District.
  • Working with partners to identify issues and co-ordinate the delivery of infrastructure through the county-wide work on the Surrey Infrastructure Capacity Project, to ensure that there is sufficient infrastructure, to support the anticipated level of development.
  • Identifying any site specific infrastructure requirements as part of the allocation of land for the Land Allocations DPD.

The Community Facilities and Infrastructure Requirements: Position Statement will kept up to date in order to record changes in provision and monitor requirements.

Community Facilities and Infrastructure Requirements - Position Statement (October 2008): This position statement provides an audit of current infrastructure provision and potential future need. The Council will continue to seek input from all relevant bodies to assist in identifying areas where joint working may assist and in order to identify any priorities for Mole Valley.

Planning Obligations and Infrastructure Provision - Code of Practice (The 'development tariff' - implemented 1st February 2008): This Code of Practice sets out an interim system for the collection of financial contributions, which will enhance the authority's ability to collect and make use of Section 106 contributions. It was initially prepared as part of a collaboration project among all 11 Surrey Districts and the County Council. Its purpose is to set out common practice and procedures for capturing infrastructure contributions across the Surrey Districts in accordance with adopted policies and nationally recommended best practice.

Sources of Further Information

7.2 Improved Travel Options and Accessibility

Improved Transport Options and Accessibility

7.2.1 It is recognised in the Regional Transport Strategy that there has been an increase in overall travel per person in the South East since 2004 including an increase in travel by car. Pressure on the transport system is increasing. The Regional Transport Strategy indicates that it is unreasonable to achieve an absolute reduction in traffic levels during the lifetime of the South East Plan and it is also not possible to build a way out of the problems resulting from the finite capacity of the transport system.

7.2.2 The Regional Transport Strategy therefore adopts a 'Manage and Invest' approach and seeks to achieve a re-balancing of the transport system in favour of sustainable modes as a means of access to services and facilities.

7.2.3 Although Mole Valley is not responsible for the transport network the District Council can contribute towards re-balancing of the transport system through the preparation and implementation of the Local Development Framework. The actions it will take are as follows:

  • Location of Development.
    The Core Strategy's spatial strategy indicates that new development will be directed to the District's built-up areas where there is the greatest access to services, facilities and jobs. This approach will contribute to reducing the need to travel and journey lengths. It will also help achieve a more sustainable form of development and support the viability of public transport. Nevertheless, the Council's Transport Evaluation does identify a 12% increase in traffic overall as a result of proposed housing development as well as commercial development which is already in the pipeline. Measures to manage traffic growth, tackle local congestion hotspots and improve travel options and accessibility will an important aspect of subsequent Development Plan Documents.
  • Supporting Rural Transport Initiatives
    In Mole Valley, 28% of the population live outside the main built-up areas in rural villages and the countryside. With some exceptions, households in these rural areas have above average levels of car ownership. Indeed, the car will continue to provide the primary mode of travel in these areas. The Council will encourage travel choice in the rural areas through initiatives such as the demand responsive Buses 4U service, although it is accepted that there is unlikely to be a single model for delivering the flexible and responsive transport services required to meet the diverse needs of the rural areas.
  • Travel Plans
    Research published by the Government indicates the important role that travel planning can play in delivering the mobility management approach that is an important element of the Regional Transport Strategy. Surrey County Council has published good practice guidance on the preparation of Travel Plans. The District Council will establish the threshold for the production of Travel Plans through the Development Management Development Plan Document, taking account of the availability and proximity of public transport facilities and the proximity of parts of the road network which have been identified as at particular risk of congestion in the Transport Evaluation. The requirement to submit Travel Plans will be a key tool in securing concrete measures to manage down travel and promote more sustainable travel choices.
  • Regional Spokes
    The Regional Transport Strategy identifies a regional spoke between the regional hubs of Guildford and Crawley / Gatwick passing through Mole Valley. This key corridor of movement contains the North Downs railway line and the A25 /A23 roads. The railway line provides an hourly service between Reading and Gatwick via Guildford, Dorking and Reigate/Redhill. It is an important link between the rail services to the west country and Gatwick airport. A half hourly service would represent a significant improvement and the Council will encourage its introduction.
  • Access to Railway Stations
    The Regional Transport Strategy indicates that proposals to increase parking at railway stations should be considered favourably and that land should be safeguarded where appropriate. Any such increase in parking should also be accompanied by measures to improve access to the railway stations by bus, cycle and walking. Car parks at the main railway stations in Mole Valley are well used and through the Land Allocations Development Plan Document consideration will be given to the scope for increasing their capacity in conjunction with improvements to other modes of access.
  • Parking
    Planning Policy Guidance 13: Transport, requires development plans to set maximum levels of car parking for broad classes of development. Through the Development Management Policies Development Plan Document the Council will provide for a level of accessibility that is consistent with the overall balance of the local transport system, including the availability of public transport.
  • Cycling & Walking
    The improvement in the extent and quality of pedestrian and cycle routes can contribute to providing sustainable access to services, facilities and jobs. Through the Land Allocations Development Plan Document and where opportunities arise through development proposals, the Council will in conjunction with the Surrey County Council; seek to improve the existing network of pedestrian and cycle routes.

Policy CS 18
Transport Options and Accessibility

  1. The availability of travel options and access will be given significant weight in allocating land for development and in considering development proposals.
  2. Transport schemes that lead to improvements in accessibility and give priority to the needs of pedestrians, cyclists and users of public transport will be supported.
  3. Development proposals will be required to be consistent with, and contribute to the implementation of the Surrey Local Transport Plan.
  4. The Council will require the submission of Travel Plans to accompany applications for development proposals above thresholds to be established through the Development Management Policies Development Plan Document. Such plans will be a condition of the granting of planning permission and implemented through a Section 106 agreement.
  5. All new housing and commercial development will be subject to the development tariff, a component of which will be directed towards enhanced public transport, promotion of more sustainable transport choices and to support improvements in the range of transport options and accessibility to services and facilities by means other than the private car (in accordance with Policy CS17).

The policy will be delivered through:

  • Working with the Local Strategic Partnership to deliver the targets relating to transport and congestion within the Mole Valley Community Plan as part of the Council's overall objective of reducing congestions.

The following indicators will be used to monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

  • Amount and percentage of new residential development within 30 minute public transport time of specific facilities.
  • Travel Plans will be monitored in accordance with Surrey County Council Good Practice Guide for Development Related Travel Plans.

The Surrey Local Transport Plan Second Edition (2006/07 - 2010/11): will be one of the principle means of delivering the objective of managing travel demand in the District. The Local Transport Plan has the following objectives:

  1. Tackling congestion to limit delays
  2. Increasing accessibility to key services and facilities
  3. Improving road safety and security
  4. Enhancing the environment and quality of life
  5. Improving management and maintenance of our transport network
  6. Transport Evaluation

Transport Evaluation: A Transport Evaluation has been undertaken to identify the effect of distributing new housing provision broadly as identified in the SHLAA (October 2008). The Transport Evaluation examined two alternative development scenarios, varying the distribution of new housing north/south between the main built-up areas. It concluded that the impact on traffic generation is not significantly affected by changing the distribution of housing units between the built-up areas. The Core Strategy's spatial strategy can therefore be concluded not to have a material impact on traffic congestion either on the Strategic Road Network (M25) or the local roads.

However, the Transport Evaluation does identify a 12% increase in traffic overall in the District as a result of proposed housing development, as well as commercial development which is already in the pipeline. Measures to manage traffic growth, tackle local congestion hotspots and improve travel options and accessibility (Goal 4) will therefore be a key element in delivery of the Core Strategy.

Sources of Further Information

7.3 Sustainable Construction, Renewable Energy and Energy Conservation

7.3.1 Ensuring that we are living within the environment's limit is a key principle of sustainable development. A major challenge in achieving this objective is however, addressing the issue of and effects from climate change.

7.3.2 In a bid to tackle climate change and the effects, the UK has signed up to the Kyoto Protocol and made a commitment to cut greenhouse gas emissions by 12.5% on 1990 levels by 2012. In addition, the Government has committed to go beyond the Kyoto Protocol and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 20% on 1990 levels by 2010 and in the longer term to make real progress towards a reduction of 80% by 2050.

7.3.3 As part of tackling climate change and reducing carbon dioxide emissions, Government is tightening the Building Regulations to bring about a 20% reduction is carbon emissions from new housing by 2010 and nearly 50% by 2013, in order to achieve zero carbon residential development in 2016. In accordance with national and regional guidance this objective should be supported by the planning system.

7.3.4 Alongside ensuring that development is provided in sustainable locations, the Council proposes that the causes and effects of climate change are reduced and mitigated against by introducing sustainable construction; renewable energy; and energy conservation principles into new development. New development and the redevelopment and refurbishment of the existing building stock can help tackle the causes of climate change through reducing the reliance on energy sources that generate greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. It can help mitigate the impact of new development on the causes of climate change through, for example, careful design and efficient resource use. This is highly relevant considering the long life span of developments.

Policy CS 19
Sustainable Construction, Renewable Energy and Energy Conservation

  1. In order to support the Core Strategy's overarching aim of achieving sustainable development, and to reduce the causes of and effects of climate change, new buildings and the redevelopment and refurbishment of the existing building stock will be required to:
    1. minimise energy use through its design, layout and orientation;
    2. maximise on-site recycling facilities and the re-use and recycling of materials used in construction;
    3. meet at least Level 3 of the Code for Sustainable Homes for housing, or BREEAM 'Very Good' construction standards for all other development, or higher as dictated by future legislation and guidance (Code Level 4 from 2013 and Code 6 by 2016). This must include a 10% reduction in total carbon emissions through the on-site installation and implementation of decentralised and renewable or low-carbon energy sources.
  2. Applicants will be required to submit evidence to demonstrate how these requirements have been met unless it can be demonstrated that compliance is not technically or financially achievable having regard to the type of development involved and its design.
  3. The Council will explore the opportunities for decentralised and renewable or low-carbon energy sources within the District.

7.3.5 The focus for improving the sustainability of development is not solely directed towards new buildings. In accordance with Policy CC4 'Sustainable Construction and Design' of the South East Plan, the Council will require, where practical, the redevelopment and refurbishment of the existing building stock to adopt and incorporate sustainable construction standards and techniques. The existing building stock will need to be adapted to not only cope with the effects of climate change but to also ensure that their contribution to the causes of climate change are mitigated and / or reduced. Advantages must therefore be taken of the opportunities provided through redevelopment or refurbishment. The necessity to focus on the existing building stock is highlighted by the fact that by 2026 the housing stock that existed at the beginning of the Core Strategy period (2006) will still account for approximately 90% of all dwellings.

Construction Standards

7.3.6 In order to drive a step-change in the improvement of the overall sustainability of new homes the Government has introduced The Code for Sustainable Homes (The Code). The Code provides a comprehensive measure of the sustainability of a new home by rating and certifying new homes against nine categorises of sustainable design: energy/CO2, pollution, water, health and well-being, materials, management, surface water run-off, ecology, waste.

7.3.7 The Code uses a 1 to 6 star rating system to communicate the overall sustainability performance of a new home. A home can achieve a sustainability rating from one star to six stars depending on the extent to which it has achieved Code standards. One star is the entry level – above the level of the Building Regulations; and six stars is the highest level – reflecting exemplar development in sustainability terms. The Code currently proposes that by 2010 all new homes should achieve a Level 3 status. This will then rise to Level 4 between 2013 and 2016 and then from 2016, all new homes should achieve a Level 6 status. That is to say that by 2016 all new homes should be zero carbon developments.

7.3.8 Whilst the Government has yet to provide a Code for other types of development, making sure that they are as energy efficient as possible is just as important. It is therefore considered as well as all new homes meeting at least Level 3 of the Code for Sustainable Homes, all other development should meet the BREEAM 'Very Good' construction standards, or higher as dictated by future legislation and guidance.

Optimising Design, Layout and Orientation of Developments

7.3.9 In planning new developments and the redevelopment and refurbishment of the existing building stock, the layout and orientation of the development alongside the design must be optimised so to minimise energy use. Where physically possible the layout of new developments should maximise the potential for passive solar gain and use the existing landform and landscape for benefits such as shelter, in order to minimise heat losses in winter.

On-site Recycling and the Re-Use and Recycling of Materials

7.3.10 New development and the redevelopment and refurbishment of the existing building stock should be designed in such a way that allows occupants to fully use the Council's recycling services. This will include adequate storage arrangements for recyclable and refuse both internal and external to each property. The layout of the site should allow safe access by refuse and recycling collection vehicles.

7.3.11 The Council will also require development design, construction and demolition to minimise waste production and associated impacts through the re-use and recycling of construction and demolition material.

Reducing Carbon Emissions

7.3.12 To achieve the Council’s overarching objective of creating sustainable developments and to reduce the causes of and effects from climate change, carbon emissions from new buildings should be reduced by at least 10%. The amount of energy to be supplied to a development through decentralised and renewable or low-carbon energy sources (in order to achieve a 10% reduction in carbon emissions) should be based on the carbon emissions of that development after energy efficiency measures have been installed. Therefore, the amount of energy to be produced through such measures will decrease if the energy efficiency of the building is maximised.

7.3.13 Policy NRM11 'Development Design for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy' of the South East Plan states that local authorities should promote greater use of decentralised and renewable or low-carbon energy in new development, including through setting ambitious but viable proportions of the energy supply for new development to be required to come from such sources.

7.3.14 The Council's policy is in-line with the general concept of the South East Plan. However, Policy CS19 focuses on a 10% reduction in the development's predicted carbon emissions through the use of on-site renewable technology rather than basing the percentage on the predicted energy consumption figure. The Council's rationale for a differing approach is to be consistent with the Code for Sustainable Homes. The Code requires developers to calculate the energy use and energy efficiency of a building in terms of carbon emissions rather than energy consumption. As well as being consistent with the Code this approach is likely to bring about greater reductions in carbon dioxide emissions by ensuring efforts are focused on reducing carbon emissions rather than simply replacing one method of generating energy with another regardless of the effect of overall carbon emissions.

7.3.15 Given that the District's Ecological Footprint (see Glossary for definition) is the third highest of all local authorities in England the Council believes that it is justified in applying the requirement to all developments. This is particularly appropriate in the case of housing developments where housing related activities are identified as the largest contributor to the District's Ecological Footprint. The type of housing developments which come forward within Mole Valley also tend to be small in nature (i.e. sites of 1-4 dwellings). Setting a higher threshold in terms of the number of dwellings where a 10% reduction must be achieved would therefore capture very few developments and make only a marginal difference to the overall sustainability of the District.

7.3.16 Reducing carbon emissions by 10% can be achieved by using a number of different technologies including solar hot water panels, photovolatic panels, small wind powered turbines, biomass heating and hot water systems, and ground and air source heat pumps. This list is not exhaustive and new technologies may be developed in time. Not all technologies will be appropriate for all sites and a feasibility study should be used to identify those technologies which are most suitable for the development.

7.3.17 The use of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) is encouraged for large mixed developments and large buildings. Mini and micro- CHP is a developing technology, which may be suitable for single unit developments. Considerable reductions in carbon dioxide emissions can be achieved by using biomass as a fuel for CHP.

7.3.18 Any on-site renewable contribution included in the development to satisfy the requirements of this policy can also be used to gain credits for the development under the Code for Sustainable Homes scoring system.

7.3.19 By implementing this policy the Council will contribute to the regional and sub-regional renewable energy targets.

Implementing the Policy

7.3.20 The Council will require evidence to be submitted with planning applications for all new developments to demonstrate how the requirements of the policy have been met unless, it can be demonstrated that compliance is not technically or financially achievable having regard to the type of development involved and its design.

7.3.21 Government Guidance on how to meet the Code for Sustainable Homes requirements is available from their website. The South East England Development Agency (SEEDA) alongside the Building Research Establishment (BRE) has developed a sustainability checklist which can be used when designing new developments to ensure that sustainability principles have been incorporated.

7.3.22 Further guidance will be produced by the Council in the form of a Guidance Note to provide applicants with information on how the Code requirements can be met in the Mole Valley context and the requirement that on all new developments the carbon emissions of predicted energy use be reduced by at least 10%.

This policy will be implemented by working in partnership with planning applicants and delivered through the development and building control processes.

The following indicators will be used by the Council to assess the effectiveness of the policy:

  • Number and percentage of new buildings/ refurbishments incorporating decentralised and renewable or low-carbon energy sources meeting the 10% required reduction in predicted carbon emissions.
  • Number and percentage of new homes meeting Code Level 3 (up until 2013); Level 4 (up until 2016); and Level 6 (2016 and beyond).
  • Number and percentage of new buildings meeting the BREEAM 'Very Good' construction standard or higher.
  • Number and percentage of buildings that have not complied with the policy or future legislation and guidance requirements based on technical or viability reasons.

The Climate Change Background Evidence Paper (January 2008): This paper provides an overview of the District in terms of energy efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions, transport use, and production of waste. The paper provides an overview of what is meant by 'climate change', the main causes and effects of climate change, and what the Council is currently doing to try and address the issues and effects of climate change.

The Paper identifies that Mole Valley has an Ecological Footprint (see Glossary for definition) of 6.39 global hectares per capita, the third highest level of all local authorities in England. Simply put if everyone lived like Mole Valley residents three planet earths would be needed to support our current lifestyles.

Activities relating to housing are identified as the largest contributor to the District's Ecological Footprint (1.68 global hectares per capita; 26% of the total ecological footprint). The footprint of housing measures the impact of fuel emissions from direct household energy use for heat, hot water, lighting and electrical appliances as well as the impact from household maintenance and from household construction.

The Climate Change Policy Background Paper (January 2008): This paper provides an outline of climate change planning policy as well as other strategies and guidance. The Core Strategy is required to draw on any other relevant strategies and programmes of the local authority and other organisations that have implications for the development and use of land.

Mole Valley Local Development Framework: Affordable Housing Financial Viability Assessment (November 2007 - April 2008): In examining the potential for increasing the amount of affordable housing that would be required from new developments an allowance was made within the build costs for providing a 10% renewable energy requirement. For all developments an additional £3,448 was added to the build cost which was based on the Energy Savings Trust Report 'Potential for Microgeneration Study and Analysis' (November 2005). The assessment showed that all developments of 1 or more units could contribute towards the provision of affordable housing whilst meeting other requirements such as a 10% renewable energy requirement and the development would still remain financially viable.

The Code for Sustainable Homes (Communities and Local Government - December 2006): On the 27 February 2008 the Government confirmed mandatory rating against the Code will be implemented for new homes from 1 May 2008. The Code for Sustainable Homes has been introduced to drive a step-change in sustainable home building practice and replaces the Ecohomes assessment for new housing in England.

Sources of Further Information

7.4 Reduced Flood Risk and Environmental Pollution

7.4.1 There are a number of threats to the quality of the environment in which we live. Within Mole Valley concerns include amongst others issues of crime, pollution and climate change. Many are addressed through the Community Plan and Community Safety Strategy. Due to the importance and overarching implications of climate change this is addressed through a series of policies. Managing flood risk is just one element of the overall approach towards addressing the implications of climate change and due to an apparent increase in flooding incidents is an area of concern for residents of Mole Valley.

Flood Risk

7.4.2 Flooding within the District originates from a number of sources, the most serious of which are expected to be fluvial and surface water flooding. With advice from the Environment Agency, the Council has undertaken a Strategic Flood Risk Assessment (SFRA) in order to have a comprehensive understanding of the source and level of flood risk within the District and provide a basis against which to apply the Planning Policy Statement 25 (Development and Flood Risk) sequential approach. This document will be used to allocate sites in a decreasing probability of flood risk. It has also been used in the preparation of the Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment (SHLAA) and contains advice for developers on undertaking Flood Risk Assessments. In addition it takes on board other relevant plans and strategies relating to the management of flood risk, particularly the Environment Agency's Catchment Flood Management Plan for the 'Middle' Mole, which seeks, amongst others, to maintain the capacity of the natural floodplain to retain water through safeguarding it from inappropriate development and stating the increasing importance of individual action to reduce risk within this area e.g. through participation in the Environment Agency's Flood Warning scheme.

Environmental Pollution

7.4.3 In many respects the risk to the environment in terms of pollution is relatively low within Mole Valley and the Core Strategy is not proposing development that is likely to lead to a significant increase in pollution (be that to air, water or noise). Neither have significant land contamination issues have been identified. It is therefore considered that national and regional guidance provide a sufficient basis on which the Council can deal with any issues that may arise e.g. Planning Policy Statement 23 (Planning and Pollution Control) and South East Plan policies on water, air and noise quality in consultation with the Environment Agency and Environmental Health Officers. Finally there are a number of ground water protection zones across the District which will be an important consideration for some proposals.

Policy CS 20
Flood Risk Management

  1. The Council will determine planning applications in accordance with the guidance contained within Planning Policy Statement 25 (Development and Flood Risk) and policy NRM4 (Sustainable Flood Risk Management) in the South East Plan. The SFRA will inform the application of the Sequential and Exceptional Test set out in Annex D of PPS25.
  2. The Council will not be seeking to allocate sites or permit applications for housing within Flood Zones 3a or 3b as it considers, after undertaking the SFRA, that there is sufficient land available to meet the requirements of the South East Plan outside of these areas. Applications or allocations within Flood Zone 2 will only be considered if it can be demonstrated that there are no suitable alternatives in areas at lower risk.
  3. The Council will expect to see the use of appropriate sustainable drainage systems (SUDS) as part of any development proposals. A Flood Risk Assessment will be required for sites within or adjacent to areas at risk of surface water flooding as identified in the SFRA. To further reduce the risk from surface water flooding all development should work towards mimicking greenfield run-off situations.
  4. Applications which relate specifically to reducing the risk of flooding (e.g. defence / alleviation work) will be supported so long as they do not conflict with other objectives for example, those relating to landscape and townscape character.

7.4.4 The Council has undertaken a Strategic Housing Land Availability Assessment in order to identify sufficient land with housing potential to meet the development requirements set out in the South East Plan. Through this work it is considered that there is sufficient land outside of Flood Zone 3a or 3b to meet the Districts housing requirements. In addition, and in accordance with the Sequential Approach, Flood Zone 2 will only be considered if sufficient housing land supply can not be identified in Flood Zone 1 to meet the housing target and all suitable alternatives have been considered. It is unlikely that it will be necessary to permit applications for housing development within Flood Zone 2 and it will not be necessary to permit applications in 3a or 3b however, applications for replacement properties in these locations will be considered providing that there is a similar or even reduced built footprint and measures to reduce flood risk will be expected.

7.4.5 Applicants should note that a Flood Risk Assessment should be undertaken for development proposals within or adjacent to areas at risk from surface water (in accordance with the above policy). The SFRA identified areas of potential risk, although circumstantial evidence will be considered on a case-by-case basis. National guidance (PPS25) also requires Flood Risk Assessments for all development proposals in Flood Zones 3a, 3b and 2 and well as all development proposals of 1 hectare or above in Flood Zone

  1. In addition modelling work undertaken by the Environment Agency indicates the extent of Flood Zone 3a if the impact of climate change is incorporated (i.e. Flows increase by 20%). For the purposes of assessing planning applications this additional area will be considered to be within Flood Zone 3a and treated accordingly. Where there is potential for other sources of flooding a flood risk assessment should be considered to investigate the level and impact of the risk and propose mitigation measures in accordance with the advice in PPS25 and the Mole Valley SFRA. Applicants should be aware of the benefits that undertaking a Flood Risk Assessment can bring to a development, even if not required.

7.4.6 In managing surface water from development sites applicants should work towards mimicking greenfield run-off situations. In order to achieve this priority should be given to prevention of surface water (e.g. through minimising paved areas, keeping drains clear, general maintenance), followed by source control measures. On-site solutions such as infiltration devices, filter strips should then be sought and only if these will not satisfactorily deal with the run-off should off-site solutions be considered (such as discharge into water courses). These requirements are complemented by Building Regulations and considerable guidance is also available via CIRIA (Construction Industry Research and Information Association).

The policy will be delivered through:

  • Working with the Environment Agency, Surrey County Council, and the Water Authorities to keep the SFRA updated, showing the latest known position on flooding and areas at risk.
  • The Council will continue to collect information on flooding incidents affecting properties, business premises and the transport network, which will be fed into updates of the SFRA; however, this can only be done where the Council is made aware of such issues.

The following indicators will be used to monitor the effectiveness of the policy:

  • The number of planning permissions and dwellings granted contrary to Environment Agency / Water Authority advice and for what reasons.
  • The number of properties in Flood Zones 2 and 3.
  • The number of new developments incorporating sustainable urban drainage systems (SUDs).

Mole Valley, Strategic Flood Risk Assessment (SFRA) - October 2008: This study identifies the areas within the District that are physically at risk from fluvial flooding. It also looks at the risk of flooding from other sources including surface water, groundwater and other artificial sources alongside the consideration of the risk of flooding in terms of the physical extent and likely impact of damage on the built and natural environment, and the risk to life. The study also takes into account the potential impact of climate change.

Sources of Further Information

7.5 Monitoring and Managing Delivery

7.5.1 The Core Strategy sets out how much development is intended to happen where and when, and by what means it will be delivered. Planning Policy Statement 12 (Local Spatial Planning) states that there must be clear arrangements for monitoring the strategy. This section sets out how the implementation of the policies in the Core Strategy will be monitored having regard also to the requirement to monitor the Government's Core Output Indicators (COI's) and any relevant National Indicators (NI's).

The Purpose of Monitoring

7.5.2 The purpose of monitoring is to assess whether the policies of the Core Strategy and other Development Plan Documents (DPDs) are:

  • achieving the objectives and intended policy outcomes
  • delivering sustainable development
  • achieving targets
  • having any unintended consequences
  • still relevant or require a review.

7.5.3 Each of the Core Strategy policy sections includes a statement of the Delivery of Policy / Monitoring which will be undertaken. The tables below indicate in more detail what will be monitored and are based around the overarching goals and specific intended outcomes of the Core Strategy policies.

A Monitoring Framework

7.5.4 The monitoring of Development Plan Documents should be integrated with wider monitoring requirements (for example monitoring of targets in the Community Plan which have a spatial component). The sustainability appraisal process also identifies targets and indicators appropriate for measuring policy implementation.

7.5.5 Monitoring should be based on whether any targets associated with the implementation of policies have been met and what impact the policies are having in respect of national, regional and other targets.

7.5.6 For the Mole Valley Local Development Framework monitoring will have regard to:

  • whether the strategy and policies of the Core Strategy and subsequent DPDs are delivering the intended outcomes;
  • the Council’s Community Strategy targets which have a ‘spatial’ context; the Sustainability Appraisal indicators;
  • the monitoring requirements of the South East Plan; and,
  • the Government's Core Output Indicators and National Indicators (NI's).

7.5.7 The Annual Monitoring Report (AMR) has to be submitted to Government by 31st December of each year. It reports on the previous twelve month period (i.e April to March) and accords with the intention that monitoring should focus on the achievement of delivering sustainable development.

7.5.8 The Annual Monitoring Report comments on the Government's Core Output Indicators (COI's) under the four themes of sustainable development from PPS1. In the future it is proposed to report within the themes of the Core Strategy's goals:

  • Goal 1 - to safeguard and enhance the highly attractive and diverse natural, built and historic environment of the District.
  • Goal 2 - to ensure provision of sufficient land to meet the District's housing requirements and provide a range of homes to address needs and means.
  • Goal 3 - to maintain a successful, sustainable and diverse local economy.
  • Goal 4 - to manage down traffic growth and encourage more sustainable transport choices by improving travel options and accessibility.
  • Goal 5 - to ensure the District's town, district, local and village centres are successful and viable places for people to live, shop and spend their leisure time.
  • Goal 6 - to safeguard and ensure provision of sufficient land and facilities for open space, sport and recreation facilities to meet current and future requirements.
  • Goal 7 - to use natural resources wisely, reduce emissions that contribute to climate change and minimise the risk to communities from the effects of climate change.
  • Goal 8 - to ensure the efficient use of existing infrastructure, a reduction in demands on infrastructure by promoting behavioural change and ensuring the delivery of additional capacity by extending or providing new infrastructure.

Monitoring of the Core Strategy Policies

7.5.9 The monitoring requirements for each of the Core Strategy policies are set out in the tables below. The tables identify whether the Core Strategy policy indicator is currently monitored or whether it is a new indicator requiring additional monitoring. The Core Output Indicators are from the Government's Update 2/2008 published in July 2008.

Indicators and Targets

7.5.10 The effectiveness of policies, and whether they are delivering the intended outcomes, should be assessed against measurable targets. It may not always be possible to set meaningful local targets. In such instances regional or national targets may be appropriate. Some policies aim to deliver a qualitative rather than a quantitative outcome. In such instances it is appropriate to monitor whether the policy is delivering the intended "direction of travel" or trend.

7.5.11 The source of the indicators are as follows:

  • AMR COI = Annual Monitoring Report Core Output Indicator
  • LI = Local Indicator: District information reported in the Annual Monitoring Report
  • SI = Sustainability Indicator from the Sustainability Appraisal Report
  • NI = National Indicator
  • New = a new indicator

7.5.12 As well as monitoring the individual policies there is a need to establish if the overall achievement of sustainable development is being delivered. The monitoring framework therefore includes an overarching sustainability indicator. This is the first indicator in the tables below.

Overarching Sustainability Indicators

Core Strategy Outcome

Policy Delivery Indicators

Target

Indicator No

Data Source

To reduce the ecological footprint of the District

Per capita hectares (gha/cap)

Reducing trend. (Mole Valley's ecological footprint is the third largest in England)

New

REAP (University of York)

To reduce carbon emissions

Per capita CO2 emissions

Reducing trend

NI 186

national datasets

The Spatial Strategy

Policy CS1 - Where Will Development be Directed (The Spatial Strategy)

Core Strategy Outcome

Policy Delivery Indicators

Target

Indicator No

Data Source

To ensure that new development is directed to previously developed land (PDL)

a) the % of new development completed on PDL
b) the % of new housing development completed on PDL

Government
target is 60%.The LDF target will be
established through the preparation of
the Land Allocations PD.

AMR COI
H3

In house
monitoring

To ensure that the amount of development delivered
accords with the spatial strategy

The amount of new (housing) development in - Leatherhead, Dorking, Ashtead, Bookham and Fetcham

Assess trends in completions

New

In house monitoring

New Homes for Mole Valley

Policy CS2 - Housing Provision and Location

Policy CS3 - Balancing Housing Provision

Policy CS4 - The Provision of Affordable Housing

Policy CS5 - Gypsies, Travellers and Travelling Showpeople

Core Strategy
Outcome

Policy Delivery
Indicators

Target

Indicator No

Data Source

To ensure the delivery of housing is meeting requirements

Annual housing completions

maintaining residual annual average rates of completions

AMR COI H1 and H2(a-d)

In house
monitoring

Maintenance of a 5 year supply of deliverable sites

at least a 5 year supply of housing

AMR COI H1 and H2(a-d) NI 159

In house monitoring

Housing trajectory

 

AMR COI H1 and H2(a-d)

In house
monitoring

To ensure proposals for housing take into account local needs in terms of tenure, type and size of dwellings

Completions by dwelling type and location

To assess trends

LI2

In house monitoring

The number of new houses completed for the ageing population

To assess trends

New

In house monitoring

To ensure that affordable housing targets are met

The number and proportion of affordable homes completed in the District
- by location

- as a proportion of all
completions

A minimum of 950 net units by 2026 (an average of 47 dwellings per annum)

AMR COI
H5
NI155

In house monitoring

Dwelling type and tenure of completed affordable dwellings

At least 50% of all new affordable dwellings as social rented

NI155

In house monitoring

The amount paid in contributions to the provision of affordable housing

 

New

In house monitoring

The number of applications for housing which did not include a contribution to affordable housing where the policy applies

0 (as all applications meeting the policy should provide for affordable housing

New

In house monitoring

Sites for Gypsies, Travellers and Travelling Show people

The number of new pitches available per annum in the District

6 or 7 new pitches by 2016

AMR COI
H4

In house monitoring

The number of enforcement actions

To assess trends

New

In house monitoring

The number of unauthorised and illegal encampments and developments.

To assess trends

New

 

To be established

The level of identified need for pitches

To assess trends

New

Through the GTAA / HNS and subsequent updates.

The number of planning applications submitted for new sites or extensions / alterations to existing sites and their outcome.

To assess trends

New

In house monitoring

Successful Town and Local District and Village Centres

Policies CS6 - 10 - Successful Town, District, Local and Village Centres (Leatherhead, Dorking, Ashtead, Bookham and Fetcham)

Policy CS11 - Rural Village Centres

Core Strategy Outcome

Policy Delivery Indicators

Target

Indicator No.

Data Source

Maintaining the vitality and viability of Dorking and Leatherhead town centres

Amount of retail floorspace gained or lost (by type) and the % within defined primary and secondary shopping areas

To assess trends

AMR
COI BD4

In house monitoring

Amount and % of all completed residential, business and recreation/leisure development

To assess trends

AMR
COI BD4

In house monitoring

Retail vacancy rates

Vacancy rates should not exceed 10%

LI 4

Mole Valley - Economic Development

Maintaining an appropriate mix and range of uses in the District / Local / Rural Village Centres

a) amount of retail floorspace gained or lost in the centres
b) vacancy rates

To assess trends

New

In house monitoring

Sustainable Economic Development

Policy CS12 - Sustainable Economic Development

Core Strategy Outcome

Policy Delivery Indicators

Target

Indicator No.

Data Source

Whether the more intensive use of employment land is resulting in an increase in jobs

The amount of new floorspace permitted

To assess trends

AMR
COI BD4

In house monitoring

Amount and % of all completed residential, business and recreation/leisure development

To assess trends

AMR
COI BD4

In house monitoring

If the District's role as a centre for knowledge based firms is increasing

Assessment of take up of commercial premises by type of firm

An indication of a positive trend

New

In house monitoring including 3[[[[[[[[[[[survey of new occupiers of commercial premises

New development in town centres (see Successful Town Centres -above)

Changes in the amount of commercial floorspace in Leatherhead and Dorking town centres

No target but assess trend

AMR COI BD4. (LI 17)

CLG - State of the Cities database

Number of jobs in Dorking and Leatherhead town centres

No target but assess trend

New

CLG - State of the Cities database

Proposals for development which seek to support a diverse rural economy

Number and type of schemes permitted for rural diversification

No target but assess trend

New

Monitoring of planning permissions

 

Number of tourism jobs created

No target but assess trends

New

NOMIS labour market statistics

Improvements in the skills base of the resident population

GCSE attainment grades A*-C

No target but assess trends

SI 3e

NI 75

Qualifications

No target but assess trends

New

IMD = Indices of Multiple Deprivation

A Continuing High Quality Environment

Policy CS13 - Landscape Character

Core Strategy Outcome

Policy Delivery Indicators

Target

Indicator No.

Data Source

To respect and enhance the character and distinctiveness of the landscape character

Annual review of the monitoring of the indicators in the Surrey Hills AONB Management Plan

 

New

AONB Management Plan

Policy CS14 - Townscape, Urban Design and the Historic Environment

Protection of townscape and local character

Applications allowed on appeal contrary to local character and design considerations

To assess trends

New

Monitoring of appeal decisions

 

The number of Grade 1 and 2* listed buildings at risk

No increase in numbers

New

Heritage at Risk Register

Policy CS15 - Biodiversity and Geological Conservation

Improving quality of protected environments

Quality of SSSI's (including areas covered by Surrey Biodiversity Action Plan habitats)

95% of the area of SSSI's to be in a favourable or recovering condition

AMR
COI E2

Natural England data

Quality of SNCI's (including areas covered by Surrey Biodiversity Action Plan habitats)

To assess trends

New - NI 197

Monitoring - to be developed with Surrey Wildlife Trust

Number of applications permitted contrary to advice from Natural England

0 (as no applications should be permitted contrary to advice from Natural England)

New

In house monitoring

General biodiversity

Changes to biological water quality of main rivers and watercourses

No target but assess an indication of a positive trend

SI 12a

Environment Agency

The amount of land managed primarily for biodiversity purposes

To assess trends

New

To be established

Open Space, Sports and Recreation Facilities

Policy CS16 - Open Space, Sports and Recreation Facilities

Core Strategy Outcome

Policy Delivery Indicators

Target

Indicator No.

Data Source

Any loss or gains in the provision of open space, sports and recreation facilities

Gains and losses of open space

To assess trends

New

In house monitoring

Proposals for new sports and recreation facilities

To assess trends

New

In house monitoring

Adequate Infrastructure, Services and Community Facilities

Policy CS17 - Infrastructure, Services and Community Facilities

Core Strategy Outcome

Policy Delivery Indicators

Target

Indicator No.

Data Source

Delivery of planning contributions - a monitoring target and indicator has yet to be developed The Community Facilities and Infrastructure Requirements: Position Statement will be kept under review and any changes monitored.

Improved Travel Options and Accessibility

Policy CS18 - Transport Options and Accessibility

Core Strategy Outcome

Policy Delivery Indicators

Target

Indicator No.

Data Source

Whether new development is located near to services so to minimise the need to travel

Amount and % of new residential development within 30 minute public transport time of specific facilities

To assess trends

LI 3

In house monitoring

Proposals which lead to improvements in accessibility and reduce congestion

Monitoring of the number of Travel Plans and there content and impact on the use of cars

To assess trends

New

Surrey County Council

Improved Travel Options and Accessibility Policy CS18 - Transport Options and Accessibility

There is a target in the Council's Community Plan to reduce the number of people who drive to work in Dorking by 5%

New

East Area Surrey Initiative on Transport (easit)

Sustainable Construction, Renewable Energy and Energy Conservation

Policy CS19 - Sustainable Construction, Renewable Energy and Energy Conservation

Core Strategy Outcome

Policy Delivery Indicators

Target

Indicator No.

Data Source

New development should support the aim of achieving sustainable development

Number and % of new developments / refurbishments meeting the required Code Level and incorporating a reduction in predicted carbon emissions

100% of eligible applications

AMR
COI E3

In house monitoring

Number and % of new developments meeting the BREEAM "Very Good" standard

100% of eligible applications

New

To be established

Number and % of developments that have not complied with requirements on technical or viability reasons

To assess trends

New

To be established

Reduced Flood Risk and Environmental Pollution

Policy CS20 - Flood Risk Management

Core Strategy Outcome

Policy Delivery Indicators

Target

Indicator No.

Data Source

Not to increase the properties and people at risk of flooding

The number of planning permissions (and dwellings) granted contrary to the advice of the Environment Agency (EA) and the Water Authorities and for what reasons.

0 (as no application should be permitted contrary to advice from the Environment Agency / Water Authorities)

AMR COI E1

EA and in house monitoring

The number of properties at risk from flooding (Flood Zones 2 and 3)

To assess trends

SI 5a

In house monitoring

The number of new developments incorporating SUDS

100% of eligible applications

New

In house monitoring




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