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7 THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND CONSERVATION

Introduction

7.1 The quality and appearance of the built environment contributes significantly to our enjoyment of those places where we live, work and participate in leisure activities.

7.2 The Borough is rich in architectural and archaeological heritage. In the rural area there are over 60 small villages which contain a variety of historic buildings and ancient monuments. There are 704 listed buildings which range from large country houses of national importance such as Belvoir Castle, to small outbuildings, walls and even tombstones.

7.3 There are 44 conservation areas in the Borough, the largest of which is in the town centre of Melton Mowbray. The beauty and character of these areas not only provide a pleasant living and working environment for local residents, but also attract visitors from beyond the Borough and are therefore an economic asset to the community.

Policy Background

7.4 Planning Policy Guidance Note No 1 "General Policy and Principles", makes it clear that the appearance of a development proposal is a material consideration in the determination of a planning application. Moreover, the Guidance Note states that good design should be the aim of all involved in the development process. PPG16 ‘Archaeology and Planning’ sets out the Secretary of States’s policy on archaeological remains on land, and how they should be preserved or recorded.

7.5 Planning Policy Guidance Note No 15 "Planning and the Historic Environment" lays emphasis on the role of local planning authorities as stewards of the historic environment. Authorities are therefore encouraged to set out clear policies for the preservation and enhancement of the historic environment in their areas, and ensure that any new building in an historic area is carefully designed to respect its setting.

7.6 The adopted Leicestershire Structure Plan (LSP) includes policies which require measures to be taken to identify, protect, preserve and enhance the historic, architectural and archaeological heritage of the County. In particular LSP Environment Policy 1 requires that measures are taken to ensure that new development is of a high standard in scale, layout, landscaping and use of materials.

Aims and Objectives

7.7 The Local Plan has the following aims and objectives:-

  1. to conserve and enhance the architectural and historic built heritage of the Borough;
  2. to ensure that new development is of a high standard of design and in keeping with its surroundings;
  3. to encourage the maintenance and economic use of listed buildings and other buildings of historic importance;
  4. to encourage building design which minimises energy usage and reduces crime potential;
  5. to ensure that development in a conservation area makes a positive contribution to its character;
  6. to protect open spaces which are important to the street scene and visual amenities;
  7. to protect the setting of settlements; and
  8. to protect historic landscapes and archaeological sites.

Policies and Proposals

The Siting and Design of Buildings

7.8 The siting and design of buildings covers a wide variety of considerations which include:-

  1. visual amenities: determined by the size, scale and appearance of buildings, space around buildings and landscaping;
  2. environmental amenities: determined by the effects of the use of a building which could lead to loss of amenity by reason of noise, smell other pollution, loss of privacy or light;
  3. safety: to include vehicular and pedestrian access and the prevention of crime.

7.9 The Council is concerned to ensure that all development should result in a 'benefit' to the community in environmental and visual terms. Various standards for development have therefore been adopted by the Council and are contained in Appendices 4 and 5 of this Local Plan which cover open space provision, play space provision and vehicular parking. These standards will be applied to development proposals where appropriate.

7.10 A number of guidance leaflets have been produced by the Council on the design of residential extensions, landscaping, car parking, building conversions, shop fronts and the design of agricultural buildings. The Council intends to produce additional guidance on building design, layout and use of materials which will be used together with the Settlement Appraisals in the Local Plan when considering criteria A) of Policy BE1 in connection with planning applications. These leaflets are available from Melton Borough Council, free of charge.

BE1

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR NEW BUILDINGS UNLESS:-

A) THE BUILDINGS ARE DESIGNED TO HARMONISE WITH

SURROUNDINGS IN TERMS OF HEIGHT, FORM, MASS, SITING, CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS AND ARCHITECTURAL DETAILING;

B) THE BUILDINGS WOULD NOT ADVERSELY AFFECT OCCUPANTS OF NEIGHBOURING PROPERTIES BY REASON OF LOSS OF PRIVACY OR SUNLIGHT / DAYLIGHT;

C) ADEQUATE SPACE AROUND AND BETWEEN DWELLINGS IS PROVIDED;

D) ADEQUATE PUBLIC OPEN SPACE AND LANDSCAPING IS PROVIDED WHERE APPROPRIATE;

E) THE BUILDINGS AND THEIR ENVIRONS ARE DESIGNED TO MINIMISE THE RISK OF CRIME;

F) WHEREVER POSSIBLE, BUILDINGS ARE DESIGNED AND SITED TO MAXIMISE SOLAR GAIN AND UTILISE ENERGY SAVING FEATURES;

G) ADEQUATE VEHICULAR ACCESS AND PARKING IS PROVIDED.


Conservation

7.11 Local planning authorities have a statutory duty to designate as conservation areas those areas of special architectural or historic interest, the character or appearance of which it is desirable to preserve or enhance. The boundaries of existing conservation areas are shown on the Proposals Map (see Insets).

Designated Conservation areas within the Borough are as follows:-

Ab Kettleby

Cold Overton

Goadby Marwood

Long Clawson

Scalford

Asfordby

Croxton Kerrial

Grimston

Melton Mowbray

Somerby

Ashby Folville

Easthorpe

Harston

Normanton

Sproxton

Barsby

Eaton

Hoby

Old Dalby

Stapleford Park

Belvoir Castle

Edmondthorpe

Holwell

Pickwell

Stathern

Bottesford

Gaddesby

Hose

Redmile

Stonesby

Branston

Great Dalby

Knipton

Rotherby

Waltham on the Wolds

Buckminster

Freeby

Knossington

Saltby

Wartnaby

Burrough on the Hill

Frisby on the Wreake

 

Saxelbye

Wymondham


Control of Development within Conservation Areas

7.12 Section 72 of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990 places a general duty on the Council to pay special attention to the desirability of preserving or enhancing the character or appearance of its Conservation Areas. However, the Courts have held that there is no requirement in this legislation that conservation areas should be protected from all development which does not enhance or positively preserve.

7.13 The Council wishes to ensure that new development makes a positive contribution to the character of a conservation area. Under Article 3(2) of the Town and Country Planning (General Development Procedure) Order 1995, the Council will normally require the submission of detailed drawings, to show elevation details, siting, construction materials and architectural detailing to support applications for outline planning permission. The location of any trees to be retained or removed should also be shown.

7.14 The Council recognises that floorscapes often make a valuable contribution to the character of conservation areas and will encourage wherever possible the retention or reintroduction of traditional floorscapes. The Council will have particular regard to development which disturbs existing footways or road surfaces of particular significance and will seek the co-operation of statutory undertakers and other agencies in avoiding the damaging effect of infrastructure development on the character or appearance of a conservation area.

7.15 When considering planning applications for development in conservation areas the Council will, when appropriate, require the submission of details which show the proposed development in its setting.

BE2

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENT WITHIN A DESIGNATED CONSERVATION AREA UNLESS IT IS OF A HIGH STANDARD OF DESIGN AND WOULD PRESERVE OR ENHANCE THE TRADITIONAL CHARACTER OF THE AREA.


Demolition Within a Conservation Area

7.16 The Courts have accepted that Section 54A of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 does not apply to decisions on applications for listed building consent or conservation areas. However, Planning Policy Guidance Note No. 15 ‘Planning and the Historic Environment’ advises local authorities to set out clearly all conservation policies relevant to the exercise of an authority’s development control function, particularly for works of demolition or alteration.

7.17 Whenever planning permission is required the Council will be concerned to ensure that any building in a conservation area is not lost unless it is clear that removal would materially benefit the appearance or character of the conservation area. The following policy will therefore apply:-

BE3

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENT WHICH REQUIRES THE DEMOLITION OF A BUILDING OR STRUCTURE WHICH CONTRIBUTES TO THE CHARACTER OR APPEARANCE OF A CONSERVATION AREA UNLESS THAT BUILDING’S CONDITION MAKES IT IMPRACTICABLE TO REPAIR, RENOVATE OR ADAPT IT TO A USE WHICH WOULD ENSURE ITS RETENTION, AND THAT EVERY POSSIBLE EFFORT HAS BEEN MADE TO RETAIN IT.

7.18 In such cases the Council will normally expect to see evidence that the freehold of a building has been offered for sale on the open market for a reasonable period of time. Where the Council is satisfied that the demolition of a building would not be detrimental to the appearance of a conservation area, and in order to ensure that an empty gap is not left in the street scene, consent will only normally be granted when acceptable detailed plans are submitted together with the demolition proposal. Full details will also be required in order to assess the proposal in relation to adjacent buildings, open spaces, trees, the general street scene and views into and out of the conservation area.

BE4

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR ANY DEVELOPMENT THAT REQUIRES THE DEMOLITION OF A BUILDING IN A CONSERVATION AREA UNLESS THE APPLICATION INCLUDES SATISFACTORY DETAILED PLANS FOR THE REDEVELOPMENT OF THE SITE, AND EVIDENCE THAT A CONTRACT FOR THE CARRYING OUT OF A REDEVELOPMENT PROPOSAL HAS BEEN LET.

7.19 The Council will encourage the retention of features such as walls, fences and hedgerows when considering proposals for development in conservation areas. Special protection is afforded to trees within conservation areas which are not the subject of a Tree Preservation Order. This provision requires 6 weeks notice to be given of any proposed tree felling, topping, cutting, uprooting or lopping and enables a local planning authority to serve a Tree Preservation Order if necessary. Further details of Tree Preservation Orders are given in Chapter 6 “Countryside and the Natural Environment” paragraph 6.65.

7.20 The Council’s ‘Built Heritage Strategy’ approved in 1997, includes policies to undertake a systematic appraisal of those settlements within the Borough that are not currently conservation areas, to determine if any part is suitable for designation and to review existing designations to ascertain if changes are necessary.

7.21 When considering new designations the Council will consider the overall character, quality and interest of a potential area rather than the merits of individual buildings. The quality of an area and its potential for designation will be assessed through an appraisal of relevant criteria.

7.22 The criteria will embrace a variety of features to include the appearance and architectural quality of buildings and their relationship with each other. Consideration will be given to the contribution that trees, open spaces and other soft landscaping elements make to the form and character of the area, and the significance of building materials. Views and vistas within settlements and the historic layout of property boundaries and thoroughfares will be considered when the alignment of conservation area boundaries are defined. The landscape setting of the settlement is also important and the views into and out of the settlement will also be assessed when designating a conservation area.

7.23 Where appropriate, other considerations may include the quality of street furniture, shopfronts, floorscape and any archaeological significance or potential.

Enhancement Schemes in Conservation Areas

7.24 The Council has a statutory obligation to prepare detailed schemes for the enhancement of the character and appearance of conservation areas and has committed financial resources to undertake schemes including a specific allocation to assist in financing the removal of overhead wires within or adjacent to conservation areas.

7.25 Subject to the availability of resources the Council will grant aid appropriate enhancement schemes within conservation areas and endeavour to persuade other grant aiding agencies to do likewise.

Buildings of Historic or Architectural Interest

7.26 There are many buildings within the Plan area which, by virtue of their special, outstanding quality, have been listed by the Secretary of State for the Environment as being of special architectural or historic interest. These buildings and their settings contribute much to the quality of the built environment and character of the area and need to be subject to careful control in respect of both physical fabric and use.

7.27 There are three distinct grades of listed buildings, the top two grades (Grade I and II*) are considered to be of outstanding importance, whilst Grade II covers those buildings of special interest. The majority of listed buildings are Grade II and about 6% are Grade I and II*.

7.28 The Department of Environment recently conducted a re-survey of buildings within the Plan area. A revised list of listed buildings in the southern half of the Plan area was published in January, 1988 and the northern half of the Plan area in March, 1991. Listed buildings within or adjacent to settlements are shown on the Proposals Map (Insets). Buildings located outside the Village Inset Maps are listed separately at Appendix 3.

7.29 Under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990, it is an offence to demolish, alter or extend a listed building in a way which would affect its character without first obtaining Listed Building Consent from the Council. The Council will monitor the condition of listed buildings and maintain a register of buildings considered to be at risk. Where appropriate, the Council will use statutory powers in order to prevent listed buildings falling into severe disrepair.

7.30 The demolition of a listed building will only be permitted under exceptional circumstances. The Council will normally expect to see evidence that the freehold of a listed building has been offered for sale on the open market for a reasonable period of time in order to demonstrate that existing uses or suitable alternative uses cannot be realised.

BE5

DEVELOPMENT INVOLVING THE TOTAL OR PARTIAL DEMOLITION OF A LISTED BUILDING, INCLUDING ANY FEATURES OF SPECIAL ARCHITECTURAL OR HISTORIC INTEREST WHICH CONTRIBUTE TO THE REASONS FOR ITS LISTING, WILL ONLY BE PERMITTED IF ALL THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA ARE MET:

A) IT IS NOT PRACTICABLE TO CONTINUE TO USE THE BUILDING FOR ITS EXISTING OR A PREVIOUS PURPOSE;

B) THERE IS NO OTHER VIABLE USE FOR THE BUILDING;

C) THE CHARACTER AND APPEARANCE OF THE LISTED BUILDING WILL BE IMPROVED BY PARTIAL DEMOLITION OR DEMOLITION OF FEATURES WITHIN ITS SETTING; AND

D) DEMOLITION AND THE CREATION OF A CLEARED SITE WILL NOT CAUSE HARM TO THE SETTING OF ANY OTHER LISTED BUILDING, THE CHARACTER OF THE STREET SCENE OR THE CHARACTER OF A CONSERVATION AREA.

IF, EXCEPTIONALLY, PERMISSION IS GIVEN TO DEMOLISH A LISTED BUILDING SO THAT DEVELOPMENT OF THE SITE MAY TAKE PLACE, PERMISSION WILL BE SUBJECT TO A CONDITION THAT DEMOLITION IS NOT CARRIED OUT UNTIL PLANNING PERMISSION HAS BEEN GRANTED AND A CONTRACT LET TO CARRY OUT THE REDEVELOPMENT SCHEME.

7.31 In considering applications for the alteration of a listed building, the Council will seek the retention of the original fabric and, where feasible and acceptable in land use terms, a continuation of the original use. The Council will seek to avoid the introduction of discordant advertisement signs, inappropriate fascias or other wall, roof or window treatments which would adversely affect the appearance of a listed building. Furthermore, the Council will seek the removal of inappropriate features and will resist proposals to paint or render the exterior of a listed building which would adversely affect its character and appearance. The following policy will apply:-

BE6

DEVELOPMENT INVOLVING PROPOSALS TO EXTEND OR ALTER A LISTED BUILDING, OR ANY FEATURE OF SPECIAL ARCHITECTURAL OR HISTORIC INTEREST WHICH CONTRIBUTES TO THE REASONS FOR ITS LISTING WILL NOT BE PERMITTED UNLESS IT WOULD PRESERVE THE BUILDING, ITS SETTING AND ANY FEATURES OF SPECIAL ARCHITECTURAL OR HISTORIC INTEREST THE BUILDING POSSESSES.

7.32 Careful consideration will be given to proposals involving the change of use of Listed Buildings and the following policy will apply.

BE7

A CHANGE OF USE OF PART, OR THE WHOLE, OF A LISTED BUILDING WILL BE GRANTED PERMISSION IF ITS CHARACTER AND FEATURES OF SPECIAL ARCHITECTURAL OR HISTORIC INTEREST WOULD BE PRESERVED OR ENHANCED. PROPOSALS FOR A CHANGE OF USE SHOULD INCORPORATE DETAILS OF ALL THE INTENDED ALTERATIONS TO THE BUILDING AND ITS CURTILAGE, TO DEMONSTRATE THE EFFECT ON ITS APPEARANCE, CHARACTER AND SETTING WHICH SHOULD EITHER BE PRESERVED OR ENHANCED.


The Setting of a Listed Building

7.33 The setting of a listed building is often an essential feature of its character, particularly the grounds of the building and the contribution the building makes to the quality of the street scene or landscape. Consequently careful consideration will be given to proposals for development affecting the setting of a listed building and the following policy will apply:-

BE8

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD ADVERSELY AFFECT THE SETTING OF A LISTED BUILDING.


Historic Building Grants

7.34 The Council is aware that the cost of maintaining historic buildings can be a considerable burden. To assist owners, both the Borough Council and County Council offer grants towards the repair and maintenance of historic buildings which help retain their traditional character and appearance in accordance with the Historic Building Grants Scheme. The scheme applies to listed buildings and buildings of importance in conservation areas.

7.35 Financial support is subject to the availability of resources. If necessary both the Council and the County Council can provide professional advice and will involve English Heritage and other advisory bodies as appropriate. The Council has produced guidance leaflets which explain the general principles concerning listed buildings and conservation areas which are available from Melton Borough Council.

Townscape

7.36 Townscape is a term which is generally given to the arrangement of buildings, natural features, street furniture, floor treatment, signs, both commercial and public, and other urban elements which together make up the appearance of a particular area. Areas with townscape value are usually historic parts of a town, but villages can also have important townscape value.

7.37 The historic part of Melton Mowbray town centre is perhaps the most important area in the Borough where townscape considerations should apply. It is the oldest, most interesting and busiest part of the town and its unique character as a small market town is expressed in the layout of streets, buildings and open spaces which have evolved from medieval times.

7.38 Much of the architecture is Georgian and early Victorian. The shopping area focuses on the Market Place where there is a variety of commercial uses in buildings many of which are listed buildings. The Market Place, King Street and Nottingham Street are pedestrian preference areas. Within and around the town centre there are a number of public open spaces which contain mature trees and shrubs and which are particularly important to the townscape value.

7.39 The attractiveness and convenience of the town centre is important to its commercial vitality as well as its conservation value. The Council has implemented measures to improve the environment of the town centre by way of new floor surfacing, tree planting and the introduction of street furniture which complements the character of the town centre.

7.40 The Council is mindful of the town centre’s historic character and will endeavour to ensure that replacement street furniture, highway surfaces, traffic/ public signs and new tree planting not only offer greater convenience and comfort for shoppers and visitors but also respect and contribute to the historic character of the town centre.

Historic Parks and Gardens

7.41 The weight given to local and structure plans by the Planning and Compensation Act 1991 coincides with growing recognition that historic parks and gardens form an important part of the historic environment.

7.42 The most important sites are contained in the English Heritage Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest. These sites are of national importance and are graded according to their importance ie. Grades I, II*, and II. Within the Borough the grounds of Stapleford Park and Belvoir Castle are registered as Grade I and are shown on the Proposals Map.

BE9

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD HAVE AN ADVERSE EFFECT ON THE CHARACTER OR SETTING OF THE HISTORIC PARKS AND GARDENS SHOWN ON THE PROPOSALS MAP.


Archaeological Sites

7.43 The present landscape of the area has been formed by man’s interaction with the environment and contains archaeological evidence of human activity in all periods of the past. There are several Scheduled Ancient Monuments within the Plan area which are protected by the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979. These sites are shown on the Proposals Map and listed at Appendix 2. English Heritage is currently reviewing all known sites and monuments in England, including those already scheduled so that more sites of national importance can be given statutory protection.

7.44 In accordance with Government advice contained in Planning Policy Guidance Note No 16 " Archaeology and Planning " the Council has sought the assistance of the County Museums Service to identify other unscheduled remains of local archaeological interest. Other known sites are registered in the Leicestershire Archaeological Sites and Monument Record and further information about these sites can be obtained from the County Museums Service. The Record is in a process of continual update and the sites listed in Appendix 2 are only up to date at the time of Plan preparation.

7.45 The preservation of archaeological sites is a material consideration in the planning process and development proposals will be assessed against potential impact on these sites. The Council will liaise with the County Museums Service and/or English Heritage on any development proposal which would adversely affect sites of known archaeological importance and any other sites which may be found in the future.

7.46 The potential conflict between the need to preserve archaeological remains and carry out development can be reduced if developers investigate at an early stage the prospect that a site contains archaeological remains. Prior to the submission of an application, discussions should be held with the Council and advice sought from relevant bodies which may include the County Archaeological Officer or equivalent and English Heritage.

7.47 The Council will wish to be satisfied that an adequate evaluation of archaeological considerations has been made at known and potential archaeological sites before granting planning permission. Applicants will normally be required to arrange for site evaluations and field trials if considered necessary.

BE10

DEVELOPMENT WILL NOT BE PERMITTED IF IT FAILS TO PRESERVE THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL VALUE AND INTEREST OF NATIONALLY IMPORTANT ARCHAEOLOGICAL REMAINS OR THEIR SETTINGS, WHETHER SCHEDULED OR NOT.

 


BE11

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL ONLY BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD HAVE A DETRIMENTAL EFFECT ON ARCHAEOLOGICAL REMAINS OF COUNTY OR DISTRICT SIGNIFICANCE IF THE IMPORTANCE OF THE DEVELOPMENT OUTWEIGHS THE LOCAL VALUE OF THE REMAINS. IF PLANNING PERMISSION IS GIVEN FOR DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD AFFECT REMAINS OF COUNTY OR DISTRICT SIGNIFICANCE, CONDITIONS WILL BE IMPOSED TO ENSURE THAT THE REMAINS ARE PROPERLY RECORDED AND EVALUATED AND, WHERE PRACTICABLE, PRESERVED.

 

Protected Open Areas

7.48 Environment Policy 1 of the LSP requires measures to be taken to protect open land which is important to the form and character of the built environment. There are many open areas of land within or adjoining the general built up area of settlements which make an important contribution to the character of the street scene or the physical environment of the settlement as a whole. An assessment of the more significant open spaces within each village and Melton Mowbray has been carried out and is summarised in the individual Settlement Appraisals.

7.49 Protected Open Areas include areas of parkland, village greens, extensive roadside verges and other public open spaces, general amenity areas, paddocks, allotments, orchards and private gardens and grounds. The following policy will be applied to protect the areas identified on the Proposals Map (Insets). The policy will not prejudice the Council’s consideration of any development proposals on other open areas of land not identified on the Inset Plans.

BE12

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENT WITHIN ANY AREA SHOWN ON THE PROPOSALS MAP AS A PROTECTED OPEN AREA EXCEPT WHERE A PROPOSAL IS IN CONJUNCTION OR ASSOCIATED WITH AN EXISTING USE AND THE DEVELOPMENT WOULD NOT ADVERSELY AFFECT THE INTRINSIC CHARACTER OF THE AREA.


Special Considerations

7.50 Some existing activities are particularly sensitive to new development in the vicinity and a failure to prevent encroachment can limit their future operation. In particular, some developments require special environmental considerations for their successful operation. The power generated by wind turbines, for example, depends upon the strength of the wind. Consequently, the building of tall structures nearby can reduce local wind speeds and hence impair the operation of the turbines. There is also clear evidence that large prominent structures, such as tower blocks and warehouses, can cause widespread disruption to television and other telecommunications due to the physical obstruction or reflection of signals. Other developments, for example those involving high precision plant, require especially clean air and so the introduction of a development that may generate dust and other airborne pollution, for example a ready-mixed concrete plant, can affect production and require expensive remedial measures.

7.51 Problems can also occur when housing and other developments encroach upon the activities of those developments that may be regarded as 'bad neighbours'. Development near facilities authorised or licensed under pollution control legislation can lead to pressure for the imposition of higher and more costly standards of pollution control. Alternatively, it can lead to the revocation of, or refusal to renew, the authorization or license and result in the closure of the business. Similar problems can arise where development is allowed near industrial units that generate noise disturbance, near hazardous developments, or near farms with livestock accommodation or slurry or sludge storage.

BE13

IN THE VICINITY OF THOSE EXISTING DEVELOPMENTS THAT:

A) NECESSITATE PARTICULAR PROVEN TECHNICAL OR ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS FOR THEIR EFFICIENT OPERATION; OR

B) ARE AUTHORIZED OR LICENSED UNDER POLLUTION CONTROL OR HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES LEGISLATION, OR OTHERWISE MAY CAUSE DISTURBANCE BY THE RELEASE OF SMOKE, FUMES, GASES, DUST, STEAM, SMELL OR NOISE;

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED IF THE PROPOSAL IS LIKELY TO IMPOSE SIGNIFICANT RESTRICTIONS ON THE ACTIVITIES OF THE EXISTING USE IN THE FUTURE.

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