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3 HOUSING

Introduction

3.1 This Chapter looks at the population characteristics of the Plan area and the likely demand and supply of housing accommodation over the Plan period. Information on recent rates of new house building in relation to estimated overall housing requirements is considered and additional details regarding housing requirements are set out, including the need for affordable housing. Housing allocations are identified in accordance with the Overall Strategy set out in Chapter 2.

3.2 The Council's requirements regarding density, design and layout are made clear and reference is made to a series of development briefs either approved, or being prepared by the Council to provide comprehensive supplementary guidance on individual site requirements. The Chapter also covers gypsy caravans. Finally, reference is made to the quality of the existing housing stock.

Policy Background

3.3 The housing and settlement policies set out below have been drawn up in accordance with the strategic policies of the adopted Leicestershire Structure Plan (LSP).

Aims and Objectives

3.4 The Local Plan has the following housing aims and objectives:-

  1. to ensure the provision of an adequate amount of genuinely available land to accommodate about 3,250 dwellings in the Borough over the Plan period;
  2. suitable locations having regard to the requirements of the housing market;
  3. to ensure that new housing is well related in scale, character, location and function to the existing settlement pattern and surrounding land uses;
  4. to ensure the provision of a satisfactory residential environment within new and existing housing areas.

Population

3.5 The 1991 Census provides the most up to date source of official population statistics. The population of residents in households in the Plan area at Census night was 44,631. This is an increase of 1,730 (4.0%) on the 1981 figure of 42,901 and 5,740(14.7%) on the 1971 figure of 38,891.

3.6 Melton Borough, in line with the majority of districts outside Leicester, showed a greater overall increase in population during the period 1981 to 1991 than Leicestershire as a whole (1.7%) or the East Midlands Region (2.4%).

Housing Requirement

3.7 The LSP requires that sufficient land is released for housing to accommodate 3,250 new dwellings over the period 1991 to 2006. This requires an annual build rate of 217 dwellings per annum and compares to an actual annual build rate of 211 dwellings per annum during the period 1981 to 1991.

Housing Supply

3.8 Over the period April 1991 to March 1995, 887 dwellings were built within the Borough and at 1st April 1995, 48 dwellings were under construction. Land for a further 824 dwellings (see Table 1) had planning permission thereby leaving a requirement for a further 1,491 dwellings.

3.9 A number of sites are allocated for residential development in the statutory adopted Melton Mowbray and Asfordby Local Plan 1989 and the non-statutory Melton (Rural Areas) Local Plan. Some of these sites have not yet been developed and have no current planning consents for residential use. A review of these sites has been undertaken to assess their suitability for development and the number of dwellings likely to be built on them.

3.10 The Local Plan allocates additional sites for development ranging from small-scale sites for 'affordable' housing, for example at Lake Terrace, Melton Mowbray to a major new village site at the former Melton Mowbray Airfield.

3.11 These sites, together with other large site residential commitments, are set out at Table 6 which can be found at the end of this Chapter.

3.12 Overall, it is possible that almost 2,000 new dwellings can be built on land with planning permission and proposed as allocations for residential development within the Plan period.

Unidentified Sites

3.13 Unidentified sites are those sites where planning permission may be granted for residential development over the Plan period but which have not been allocated for development in the Plan, because they are too small (less than 10 dwellings) or because they are large sites which arise as a consequence of redevelopment (existing sites in commercial or industrial use being redeveloped).

Small Unidentified Sites

3.14 The development of small sites (less than 10 dwellings) has made a significant contribution to the supply of new housing over recent years, particularly in the rural area. A total of 688 dwellings were built on small sites over the 9 year period 1986 to 1995 (76 per year).

3.15 Over the period 1991 to 1995, 268 dwellings were built on small sites (67 per year). If this trend continues over the remaining period a further 737 dwellings could be built on small sites. If outstanding planning consents on small sites, and dwellings under construction on small sites at 1st April 1995 are included, (the overall assumed supply of which is 277 dwellings) the unidentified 'net' small site contribution is estimated to be 460 dwellings.

Large Unidentified Sites

3.16 In preparing proposals for the distribution of dwellings in each district as set out in the LSP, the County Council has had regard to the number of dwellings coming forward on other unidentified sites. These are sites of 10 dwellings or more which have not been allocated for new residential development but which gain planning permission. The Borough Council has considered the number of dwellings that are likely to come forward in the future on such unidentified sites in view of past rates and future potential for these sites.

3.17 Over the 5-year period 1986 to 1991, planning permission was granted and development took place on 6 sites. 72 dwellings were built (14/year). Over the period 1991-1994, 26 dwellings were built on 2 unidentified sites (9/year). At 1st April 1994, a further 27 dwellings on 3 sites were under construction or remained to be developed.

3.18 The preparation of this Local Plan has involved the survey and identification of potential housing sites in excess of 0.4 hectares (1 acre) and those expected to come forward are allocated for development. The Government’s Planning Policy Guidance on Housing (PPG 3 (Revised)) advises that housing land availability studies should not make assumptions about the emergence of large unidentified sites in excess of 1 hectare, and this is generally accepted to hold good in the calculation of housing land supply. Although every effort has been made to identify sites at more than 0.4 hectares, an allowance has been made for the construction of houses on unidentified sites of up to 1 hectare as there is evidence that more sites in this range are likely to emerge than can be individually identified in advance. However it is likely that only a modest number of new dwellings will be built on identified sites within Town and Village Envelopes on sites between 0.4 and 1 hectare and capable of accommodating 10 or more dwellings.

3.19 A summary of the likely housing supply situation is as follows:-

Table 1  
Summary of Housing Land Supply (all sites-at 1st April 1995)  
Built 1991-1995 887
Under Construction 48
Outstanding Planning Permissions 824*
Proposed Allocations 1,039
Small Site Allowance 460
Other Unidentified Sites 85
TOTAL 3,343

* includes Edendale Road, Melton Mowbray which was granted planning permission after 1st April 1995

LSP Dwelling Requirement (1991-2006) 3,250

Residential Land Availability Monitoring

3.20 Each year, and throughout the Plan period, the Council will monitor the housing supply situation within the Borough as a whole to ensure that new housing provision meets the requirements set out in the LSP. If it appears that housing requirements are not being met, consideration will be given to how this can be rectified when the Plan is reviewed.

Policies and Proposals

3.21 This section describes the housing land allocations identified on the Proposals Map, and provides further details on each individual site. The site specific policies H12-H16 for sites allocated for residential development should be read in conjunction with Policy OS1 which sets out broad criteria for all new development located within the defined Town and Village Envelopes.

Existing Commitments

3.22 Of the large sites (10 dwellings or more) identified on the Proposals Map for housing, there are several sites where planning permission for has already been granted. It is possible that planning permission on these sites may lapse. It is therefore necessary to indicate the Council's policy regarding applications for the renewal of existing planning consents should this arise during the Plan period.

H1

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE RENEWED FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT AT THE FOLLOWING SITES SHOWN ON THE PROPOSALS MAP IN THE EVENT OF PLANNING PERMISSION LAPSING:-

 

1) LONGFIELD ROAD, MELTON MOWBRAY

1.00 HA

 

2) THE CONVENT, DALBY ROAD, MELTON MOWBRAY

0.54 HA

 

3) NEWPORT LODGE, MELTON MOWBRAY

0.60 HA

 

4) OXFORD DRIVE, MELTON MOWBRAY

1.20 HA

 

5) MAIN STREET, ASFORDBY

0.80 HA

 

6) EASTHORPE ROAD, BOTTESFORD

0.28 HA

 

7) BECKINGTHORPE FARM, BOTTESFORD

1.68 HA

 

8) NEW CAUSEWAY, BARKSTONE LE VALE

0.80 HA

 

9) EDENDALE ROAD, MELTON MOWBRAY

15.60HA

 

10) GRANTWOOD ROAD, MELTON MOWBRAY

6.61HA

 

11) FRAMLAND HOSPITAL, MELTON MOWBRAY

3.46HA


Proposed Allocations

Melton Mowbray

3.23 This section deals with proposed housing allocations identified on the Proposals Map. It includes undeveloped sites previously allocated in the adopted statutory Melton Mowbray and Asfordby Local Plan 1989 and new allocations. At some sites planning applications have been submitted to the Council and negotiations are taking place on appropriate legal Agreements to ensure particular developer obligations are fulfilled as part of the development proposal. At 1st April 1994 the sites in Policy H2 did not have the benefit of planning permission.

H2

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT ON LAND ALLOCATED FOR RESIDENTIAL USE ON THE PROPOSALS MAP IN MELTON MOWBRAY AT THE FOLLOWING SITES PROVIDED LAYOUT, DENSITY, SITING, DESIGN, EXTERNAL APPEARANCE, LANDSCAPING, ACCESS AND PARKING DETAILS ARE SATISFACTORY:-

 

1) DIEPPE WAY

1.46 HA

 

2) HOMESTEAD

1.73 HA

 

3) KIRBY LANE

1.70 HA

 

4) LAKE TERRACE

0.47 HA

 

5) SCALFORD ROAD FARM

1.95 HA

 

6) SWALE CLOSE

0.80 HA

 

7) UPLANDS / POCHIN CLOSE

2.00 HA

3.24 Table 6, identifies which of the above sites already have the benefit of detailed planning permission and where construction is already underway (U/C), which sites have outline or full planning permission but where development has not yet started (O and F) and those sites allocated for residential development in the Melton Mowbray & Asfordby Local Plan which are still considered to be genuinely available but where development has not yet started (EA). Proposed new allocations are also identified (NA).

3.25 A review of land allocated for residential development in the Melton Mowbray & Asfordby Local Plan led to the conclusion that it is no longer appropriate to allocate 0.6 hectares of land at The Crescent and 1.1 hectares of land south of Asfordby Road, Melton Mowbray. Land at The Crescent was originally allocated for residential development as part of a larger site. This land has now been developed and the remaining land, in Council ownership, is largely used for allotment purposes. The Council will review the availability of this land with regard to the continued need to meet demand for allotments in the area.

3.26 The site at Asfordby Road can only be satisfactorily accessed by demolishing good residential properties fronting Asfordby Road. Such a course of action would not appear to be viable and there is therefore no certainty that the site will be developed during the Plan period. Any planning applications for residential development at this site can be considered in the context of the general development policy for land within the Town Envelope of Melton Mowbray (Policy 0S1).

3.27 The appraisal of the Melton Mowbray area referred to in Chapter 2 has enabled the Council to identify a Melton Mowbray "Town Envelope" beyond which residential development will not normally be permitted. "Protected Open Areas" within the urban area are also identified. Residential development will not normally be permitted within these areas (see Policy BE12). Further background information on the appraisal and determination of the Melton Mowbray Town Envelope can be found at paragraphs 2.60 to 2.63 in Chapter 2 and the Settlement Appraisal. Further information on the "Protected Open Areas" is contained in Chapter 7 (paragraphs 7.49 to 7.50).

The New Village at the former Melton Mowbray Airfield

3.28 The Plan makes provision for the development of a new village on land at the former Melton Mowbray Airfield as identified on the Proposals Map. The development will be subject to a developer entering into a comprehensive legal agreement under Section 106 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 which covers such matters as infrastructure provision, phasing and the maintenance of open land. Layout, design and density are to be dealt with in an agreed Master Plan. The Council is preparing a revised development brief for the new village which will provide more detailed supplementary planning guidance on its development.

3.29 Further details of the scheme and Local Plan policies are set out at " The New Village" Chapter 14. The development of the new village is expected to commence in the latter half of the Plan period. The gross site area allocated for residential development is approximately 62 hectares (153 acres). At a gross density of 20 dwellings per hectare (8 per acre) this site could accommodate 1,240 dwellings. This overall housing density figure is derived from density guidance in the draft New Village Development Brief. The full development of the new village together with existing housing commitments and allocations elsewhere, would lead to an over-provision within the Plan period by some 650 dwellings. Accordingly, planning permission will not be granted for more than 700 dwellings at the new village within the Plan period in order that overall housing provision does not exceed the requirements of the LSP (See Policy NV2). The Council will monitor residential land availability as set out at paragraph 3.20. If housing requirements are not being met, it is likely that the option for releasing further land at the new village within the Plan period will be considered favourably. The further phasing of development at the new village beyond the Plan period will be considered when the Plan is reviewed.

Asfordby/Asfordby Valley and Asfordby Hill

3.30 Asfordby is a large rural village lying 3 miles to the west of Melton Mowbray in the River Wreake Valley.

3.31 Asfordby Valley is a minor settlement of linear form lying adjacent tthe A6006 and a mile to the east of Asfordby. Asfordby Hill overlooks the Wreake Valley a further mile to the east, and is also served by the A6006. Further details on these settlements are set out in the Settlement Appraisals.

3.32 The 1991 mid-year population estimate for the parish of Asfordby is 3,113. Over the period 1981 to 1995, 125 dwellings were built; a building rate of just under 9 per year. This was in line with the requirements of the 1987 Leicestershire Structure Plan, which states that provision should be made for no more than 150 dwellings over the period 1981-1996. The LSP makes no specific housing provision for Asfordby.

3.33 Between 1991 and 1995, 18 dwellings have been built in the parish. Furthermore at 1 April 1995 there were outstanding planning consents for 54 dwellings. The only allocation for residential development at Asfordby in this Local Plan is at Jubilee Avenue. This site has the capacity to accommodate some 54 dwellings. Table 2 summarises total housing land supply at 1st April 1995.

Table 2  
Housing land supply in Asfordby / Asfordby Valley / Asfordby Hill  
Built (1991-1995) 18
Under Construction 0
Outstanding Planning Permissions 54
Proposed Allocations 54
Total 126

3.34 The A6006 now by-passes the village and provides good access to Melton Mowbray, the M1 and Loughborough and the A607 lies 1 mile to the south.

3.35 The site at North Street, Asfordby Valley has now been completed (29 dwellings). Scope for further residential development at Asfordby Valley and Asfordby Hill is very limited.

H3

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT ON LAND ALLOCATED FOR RESIDENTIAL USE ON THE PROPOSALS MAP AT ASFORDBY PROVIDED LAYOUT, DENSITY, SITING, DESIGN, EXTERNAL APPEARANCE, LANDSCAPING, ACCESS AND PARKING DETAILS ARE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE OTHER POLICIES OF THE PLAN:-

 

1) JUBILEE AVENUE

2.00 HA

3.36 Table 6, at the end of this Chapter identifies those sites where outline planning permission has been granted but where development has not yet started (O) and land which is already allocated for development in the Melton Mowbray & Asfordby Local Plan (EA). Proposed new allocations are also set out (NA).

Bottesford

3.37 Bottesford is the other main rural centre and serves an extensive area in the northern part of the Borough. Further details of the role and signficance of Bottesford are set out in the Settlement Appraisal. The 1991 mid -year population estimate for Bottesford is 2,700. Over the period 1981-1991 some 270 dwellings were built.

3.38 The 1987 Leicestershire Structure Plan stated that provision should be made for no more than 150 dwellings over the period 1981-1996; a building rate 10 per year.

3.39 The village has grown rapidly since 1981, and by 1991 the 1987 Leicestershire Structure Plan provision was exceeded by 80%. The average annual building rate over this period was 27 per year. A Council survey of occupants of new houses carried out in 1987 revealed that the majority were occupied by households moving into the village. The LSP makes no specific housing provision for Bottesford.

3.40 Over the period 1991 to 1995 a further 85 dwellings have been built in the village and at 1st April 1995 there were 6 dwellings under construction. Planning permission has been granted for 54 dwellings which have yet to be built and a residential allocation for approximately 45 dwellings (at a density of 25 units per hectare) is included in the Plan. Table 3 summarises total housing land supply at 1st April 1995.

Table 3  
Housing land supply in Bottesford  
Built 1991-1995 85
Under Construction 6
Outstanding Planning Permissions 54
Proposed Allocations 45
Total 190

3.41 Bottesford has grown because of its strategic location and its role as a rural centre serving a wide hinterland. The Council acknowledges this role and considers that existing land provision together with likely "windfall" sites will more than provide for local population needs and enable a modest element of net in-migration. The following policy will therefore apply:-

H4

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT ON LAND ALLOCATED FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT ON THE PROPOSALS MAP AT BOTTESFORD AT THE FOLLOWING SITE PROVIDED LAYOUT, DENSITY, SITING, DESIGN, EXTERNAL APPEARANCE, LANDSCAPING, ACCESS AND PARKING DETAILS ARE IN ACCORDANCE WITH OTHER POLICIES OF THE PLAN:-

 

1) THE VINERIES, BELVOIR ROAD

1.80 HA

3.42 The Vineries site was allocated for residential development in the Melton (Rural Areas) Local Plan and there are no known contraints to its development within the Plan period.

Other Villages

3.43 Planning applications for new residential development within the Village Envelopes will be considered in the context of Policies OS1and H5 below. Existing provision for larger scale new residential development is acknowledged by the following policy:-

H5

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT ON LAND ALLOCATED FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT ON THE PROPOSALS MAP AT THE FOLLOWING SITE PROVIDED LAYOUT, DENSITY, SITING, DESIGN, EXTERNAL APPEARANCE, LANDSCAPING, ACCESS AND PARKING DETAILS ARE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE OTHER POLICIES IN THE PLAN:-

 

1) BOYERS ORCHARD, HARBY

0.41 HA

3.44 Boyers Orchard was proposed for residential development in the Harby Village Plan (1981) and was also identified as a housing allocation in the Melton (Rural Areas) Local Plan.

3.45 Within recent years much of the new housing development in the rural area has been in the form of small infill developments in existing villages. Some of these developments have been unsuitable in both scale and character. Whilst the Council acknowledges that some additional housing will be appropriate from time to time, in many villages there is a need to encourage future development that not only reflects the character of existing development but also makes a positive contribution to the village scene and is not out of scale with the size of the village. Policy H6 below will apply in conjunction with Policy OS1. For a "small group of dwellings" to be considered acceptable development the criteria at Policy OS1 shall be met. There will be a need to ensure that development does not adversely affect the form, character and appearance of the village.

H6

PLANNING PERMISSION FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT WITHIN VILLAGE ENVELOPES SHOWN ON THE PROPOSALS MAP WILL BE CONFINED TO SMALL GROUPS OF DWELLINGS, SINGLE PLOTS OR THE CHANGE OF USE OF EXISTING BUILDINGS.


Affordable Housing

3.46 Government advice on affordable housing is set out in Planning Policy Guidance Note No 3 'Housing'. The Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions Circular 06/98 ‘Planning and Affordable Housing’ supplements the Guidance Note and amplifies the Government’s preferred approach to planning and affordable housing.

3.47 In advising of a definition for affordable housing, Circular 06/98 states that it should encompass both low-cost market and subsidised housing (irrespective of tenure, ownership or financial arrangements), that will be available to people who cannot afford to rent or buy houses generally available on the open market. When seeking to achieve the provision of affordable housing through the policies of the Local Plan, the Council will negotiate such provision in accordance with the advice of the Circular.

3.48 The Circular also advises that any local plan policy for affordable housing should be based on a good understanding of the needs of the area over the period of the development plan.

Need for Affordable Housing

3.49 In February/March 1994 a Borough wide "Housing Need Survey" was carried out to determine individual household's perceived needs for future housing, including affordable housing. Information from the survey, along with information on the supply of and demand for existing Council and Housing Association accommodation, has been considered in order to identify the Borough's need for affordable accommodation in the Plan period.

3.50 A response rate of 61% was achieved by the Council's "Housing Need Survey" which was sent to all known domestic properties within the Borough. The survey results were compared with information available from the 1991 Census of Population and indicated that the response to the survey comprised an accurate cross section of the population. A weighting factor has therefore been applied to estimate what the survey results would have revealed if every household had responded to the survey. The following results reflect this assumption.

3.51 The "Housing Need Survey" found that a total of 2,142 additional households are likely to be formed from existing households within the Borough who would require housing within the Borough over the period 1994-1999. The amount that these households expect to be able to pay for rent or mortgage was assessed against current public and private sector rent levels and house prices in order to identify those households with a need for affordable housing as defined at paragraph 3.47 above. This revealed the following information:-

  1. 961 households could afford under £40 per week, and therefore could afford only to rent from the Council;
  2. 855 households could afford £40 - £60 per week and could therefore afford to rent from the Council or a Housing Association or maybe part rent / buy.

3.52 From this information there is an estimated total of 1,816 households in need of affordable housing. It is noted however that a further 210 households could afford £60 to £80 per week and could therefore afford to buy or rent at the lower end of the open market, although respondents with a requirement for family housing would probably be unable to meet their housing needs in full.

3.53 The "Housing Need Survey" provides more detailed information on the perceived needs of geographic zones within the Plan area. There are groups of settlements, often with a dominant settlement which provides local services. This is particularly significant information in guiding the Council's affordable housing 'exceptions' policy (see paragraph 3.69). The survey also provides more detailed information on the type of accommodation required and the household characteristics of those in need.

3.54 The Council intends to regularly update the information obtained from the 1994 "Housing Need Survey" with sample surveys. This will enable up-to-date information to be available to the Council in negotiating the provision of affordable housing.

3.55 The level of need referred to at paragraph 3.52 above is considerably in excess of the Council's current register (the 'Waiting List') which includes the statutory homeless.

3.56 In order to derive an estimate of the maximum possible need for affordable housing over the Plan period to 2006, it is assumed that the average annual housing need of 363 dwellings identified within the 5 year period 1994 to 1999 (1,816 ÷5) is maintained over the period 1999 to 2006. This gives a total need of 4,356 affordable dwellings. It is also assumed that these needs will be partly met from re-lets of existing Council House and Housing Association accommodation which over the 5 year period 1990-1994 has been on average 162 dwellings per year. From this, an overall 'maximum' affordable housing 'target' is identified as 2,400 units of accommodation.

3.57 This figure does not take account of two significant sources of need:-

  1. the adopted LSP allows for an element of net 'in migration' to the Borough. These households will generate further affordable housing needs from the concealed households that will emerge (eg. young members of the family);
  2. the "Housing Need Survey" does not include the homeless.

3.58 The survey does however include the aspirations of members of existing households wanting separate accommodation which may well be in excess of what is genuinely required. In this respect the survey returns need to be treated with caution. It is likely that such aspirations exceed the more realistic estimate of new household formation produced by the strategic planning authority in assessing overall requirements for new housing.

3.59 From the above information it is apparent that there is a significant need for affordable housing during the Plan period. The Council has to consider this in the context of a rising Council House waiting list, increased numbers of homeless applicants, a depleted housing stock (due to 'Right to Buy' sales) and a shortage of building land in its ownership.

3.60 In response to the information obtained from the "Housing Need Survey" the Council has set out its priorities for Housing Association activities in its Housing Strategy 1994/95 as follows:-

  1. rented family housing in Melton Mowbray;
  2. rented family housing in rural areas;
  3. rented housing for single persons in Melton Mowbray, including "Homes over the Shop Scheme";
  4. special needs rented housing, including elderly persons housing;
  5. houses for shared equity sale.

3.61 The Council has also considered the level of anticipated financial resources available both to itself and to other public sector housing providers (predominantly Housing Associations). A small building programme of 20-30 new houses per year has been maintained by the public sector and this is considered a minimum target of achievement over the remaining Plan period to 2006. These dwellings have been, and should continue to be predominantly 2/3 bedroom family houses for rent. A further Council priority is the provision of rented housing for single people. A minimum realistic target based on recent past levels of funding provision in the public sector is considered to be 10 units per year. In total this adds up to a minimum affordable housing target of 420 dwellings over the remaining Plan period 1994 to 2006. These units should be primarily for rent for small families and single people.

Affordable Housing Supply

3.62 Set against the above analysis of need and likely resources available, the supply of affordable housing either built or committed over the Plan period is as follows:-

Table 4    
The Supply of Affordable Housing at 1st April 1994    
Site
Number of Affordable Units Built (1991/94)
Outstanding

1 Sandy Lane, Scalford

4

2

2 Silverwood Road, Bottesford

26

0

3 Sandpit Lane, Long Clawson

24

6

4 Back Lane, Old Dalby

9

0

5 Main Street, Asfordby

0

4

6 Morley Street, Melton Mowbray

53

0

     
Total 116 12

3.63 The Council will seek the provision of further affordable housing units during the Plan period by making Council land available to Housing Associations by negotiating for the provision of affordable housing as part of significant new private sector housing development, and by the implementation of an 'exception sites' policy in the rural area (see paragraph 3.69 below). The Council will also encourage other ways to provide affordable housing units, such as the conversion of non-residential property to small dwellings and the re-use of space above shops.

Affordable Housing on Allocated Sites

3.64 In line with the above, the Council has considered the scope for the provision of affordable housing on sites allocated for residential development in the Local Plan. The Council has set out a target level of affordable housing provision for specific sites. In some cases it will be necessary for the Council to seek to negotiate a contribution of affordable houses on sites having regard to housing demand, site conditions and other material considerations prevailing at the time sites become available for development. Further details on the specific type of housing need will be determined by the Council, and this information will form the basis for negotiations with the developer of an allocated site.

H7

THE COUNCIL WILL SEEK TO NEGOTIATE THE PROVISION OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING ON THE FOLLOWING SITES ALLOCATED FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT:-

 

1) DIEPPE WAY, MELTON MOWBRAY;

2) LAKE TERRACE, MELTON MOWBRAY;

3) SCALFORD ROAD FARM, MELTON MOWBRAY;

4) UPLANDS/POCHIN CLOSE, MELTON MOWBRAY;

5) NEW VILLAGE AT FORMER MELTON MOWBRAY AIRFIELD;

6) MAIN STREET, ASFORDBY;

7) JUBILEE AVENUE, ASFORDBY;

THE COUNCIL WILL ALSO HAVE REGARD TO EVIDENCE OF NEED FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN THE LOCALITY WHEN CONSIDERING PLANNING APPLICATIONS FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT ON LAND NOT ALLOCATED IN THE LOCAL PLAN. WHERE THERE IS EVIDENCE OF NEED, THE COUNCIL WILL NEGOTIATE FOR THE INCLUSION OF AN ELEMENT OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING HAVING REGARD TO SITE, SIZE, SUITABILITY, THE ECONOMICS OF PROVISION AND THE NEED TO ACHIEVE A HOUSING DEVELOPMENT THAT INCORPORATES A MIX OF HOUSING TYPES IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PROVISIONS OF CIRCULAR 06/98.

3.65 When securing affordable housing and controlling occupancy, Circular 06/98 advises local authorities that both conditions and planning obligations may be legitimately used to ensure that some housing is occupied either initially or in perpetuity, only by people falling within particular categories of need for affordable housing. When granting planning permission the Council will where necessary, apply conditions or enter into legal agreements under Section 106 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 to ensure that affordable housing is occupied by those who cannot afford to rent or buy houses generally available on the open market.

3.66 Where a registered social landlord is to be responsible for the management of affordable housing, the Council will not normally impose additional occupancy controls. On sites which involve both general market housing and affordable housing and where no social landlord is involved, the Council may wish to ensure that the affordable housing has been built and allocated to future occupants before a proportion of the general market housing is occupied.

3.67 Further details of the level of provision of affordable housing which the Council will seek to negotiate on the sites referred to in Policy H7 above is set out at Policies H12 to H16 below. Development briefs have or will be prepared for these sites in order to provide further guidance. The number of affordable dwellings sought in pursuance of the Council's housing objectives are set out at Table 5 below.

3.68 This level of provision (242 dwellings) combined with existing commitments (12 dwellings-see Table 4) falls short of both the overall level of need identified by the "Housing Need Survey" and the minimum affordable housing target expressed as the achievement of a continuation of recent past levels of provision. Nevertheless, in view of the limited funding available to the Council and Housing Associations, the provision is considered reasonable and achievable.

Table 5 - Provision of Affordable Housing on New Housing Land Allocations
Site
Net /Density/ha
No. of Affordable Dwellings
Comment

A Melton Mowbray

   

It is assumed that development takes place at the mid- point in the density range.

Dieppe Way

25-37

15

33% provision of affordable housing

Lake Terrace

30-40

16

100% provision of affordable housing

Scalford Road Farm

20-30

10

20% provision of affordable housing.

Pochin Close/The Uplands

25-37

18

Pochin Close/Uplands as specified by the County Council(Social Services) (approx. 30% provision of affordable housing).

B Proposed New Village

     

Former Airfield

30-40

140

i.e. 20% provision from 700 dwellings,element of development expected to be released by the developer within the Plan period.

C Asfordby

     

Jubilee Avenue

27

18

33% provision of affordable housing.

Total

 

217

 

Other Affordable Housing Sites

3.69 In recognition of the need identified for affordable housing in the rural area following assessment of the Council's "Housing Need Survey" in 1994, the following policy will apply:-

H8

IN EXCEPTIONAL CIRCUMSTANCES THE COUNCIL MAY GRANT PLANNING PERMISSION FOR A DEVELOPMENT ON THE EDGE OF A VILLAGE WHICH MEETS A GENUINE LOCAL NEED FOR AFFORDABLE DWELLINGS WHICH CANNOT BE ACCOMMODATED WITHIN A VILLAGE ENVELOPE PROVIDED:-

A) THE NEED IS ESTABLISHED BY THE COUNCIL;

B) A LEGAL AGREEMENT IS ENTERED INTO BETWEEN THE COUNCIL AND DEVELOPER TO SECURE OWNERSHIP AND BENEFITS TO SUCCESSIVE OCCUPIERS AND ENSURE AVAILABILITY OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING FOR LOCAL PEOPLE IN NEED;

C) THE DEVELOPMENT WOULD BE IN KEEPING WITH THE SCALE, CHARACTER AND SETTING OF THE VILLAGE AND WOULD NOT HAVE AN ADVERSE EFFECT ON THE COMMUNITY OR LOCAL ENVIRONMENT;

D) COMMUNITY SERVICES ARE AVAILABLE NEARBY TO SERVE THE NEEDS OF THE OCCUPANTS;

E) LAYOUT, DENSITY, SITING, DESIGN, EXTERNAL APPEARANCE, LANDSCAPING, ACCESS AND PARKING DETAILS ARE IN ACCORDANCE WITH OTHER POLICIES IN THE PLAN.


3.70 When considering proposals for affordable housing the Council will require evidence from its own "Housing Need Survey" or similar evidence to relate the proposal to the type of affordable dwellings required within the local community. The Council will not permit development which could set a precedent for ribbon development on the edge of villages. Small sites on the edge of larger villages will generally provide the most appropriate locations.

Density

3.71 Although the LSP sets out the overall housing requirement for the Melton area over the Plan period, it is the role of the Local Plan to determine how much land should be allocated for housing to meet this requirement. Clearly housing density is an important issue. The 1987 Leicestershire Structure Plan assumed an average density of 27 dwellings per hectare in the County outside the City of Leicester. The adopted LSP seeks to encourage higher density housing development wherever possible to make the most effective use of limited land resources.

3.72 In the Melton area, over the period 1986-1993 the overall average density on large completed sites (ie. in excess of 0.4 hectares) has been 26 dwellings per hectare. Individual site densities tend to vary however and some of the larger traditional estates on the edge of Melton Mowbray have been developed at about 22 dwellings per hectare, whilst some of the smaller 'infill' sites within the town have been developed at over 35 dwellings per hectare.

3.73 If higher density development is appropriate to a site, bearing in mind site characteristics and the nature and character of the surroundings, there are a number of distinct advantages relating to the minimisation of land taken up for new housing and energy efficiency. The Council will therefore normally encourage higher density residential development (in the range 30 to 40 dwellings per hectare) where such advantages are evident. There are also situations where higher density development should be encouraged in order to secure affordable housing in areas of demand or to meet the needs of specialist groups such as the elderly. Guidance on appropriate densities of residential development on sites allocated in the Local Plan is set out at policies H12 to H16 below. Where appropriate further guidance on specific sites will be set out in development briefs to be published as supplementary planning guidance.

3.74 There are residential areas, particularly in Melton Mowbray, where housing is laid out to a very low density and where it would be inappropriate to encourage high density development including 'infill' and redevelopment. The Victorian and Edwardian villas in the Sandy Lane/Dalby Road area for example retain their character as a consequence of the absence of high density infill development. More modern, low density housing areas such as the Sandy Lane/Burton Road area and the current Grantwood Road development off Thorpe Road would also be adversely affected by high density infill.

3.75 Specific guidance on the density of residential development at the proposed new village at the former Melton Mowbray Airfield is set out at Chapter 14 of this Plan.

3.76 The Council will have regard to the following policy when considering the development of residential land:-

H9

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR HIGHER DENSITY RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT WHERE THIS IS COMPATIBLE WITH THE NATURE OF THE SITE AND THE CHARACTER OF ITS SURROUNDINGS PROVIDED:-

A) THE SITE IS WELL RELATED TO GOOD PUBLIC TRANSPORT FACILITIES OR CLOSE TO THE CENTRE OF MELTON MOWBRAY OR;

B) THE SITE HAS THE POTENTIAL TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE NEED FOR AFFORDABLE OR SPECIALIST HOUSING WITHIN THE LOCALITY.


Residential Design

3.77 The Council is aware that good design in new development, including landscaping, can do much to make new housing more acceptable in the local community. Aspects of the design of new housing will be controlled where these would clearly have an adverse effect on adjacent development or the general character of a village or neighbourhood. The Council's main criteria to be met is contained in Policy OS1 and Policy BE1.

3.78 The Council has published guidance leaflets on house extensions and the landscaping of major development sites and intends to produce guidance on building design to include housing development.

Amenity Open Space in New Housing Developments

3.79 It is a well-established and accepted principle that new residential development should include the provision of appropriate areas of open space. Pleasant, well laid-out areas for public enjoyment, recreation and children’s play are essential elements in well designed residential layouts.

3.80 Within residential layouts, woodlands, commons, landscaped areas and water features offer opportunities for passive recreation. These areas are quite separate from more formal playing spaces which form an equally important component in the design of residential areas.

3.81 The Council will therefore seek to ensure that amenity space is provided within developments of 10 dwellings or more at the rate of 5% of the gross development site area. Appendix 5 contains the Council’s adopted standards for the provision of amenity open space in new housing developments.

H10

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR NEW RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT UNLESS AMENITY OPEN SPACE IS PROVIDED WITHIN THE SITE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL’S STANDARDS AT APPENDIX 5 OF THIS LOCAL PLAN.


Outdoor Playing Space in New Housing Developments

3.82 Outdoor playing spaces are areas of land that are available for sport, active recreation or children’s play. These areas must be of a suitable size and nature for their intended purpose, safely accessible and available to the public. The National Playing Fields association (NPFA) recommends a minimum standard for outdoor playing space of 2.43ha per 1,000 population. This is commonly called the ‘NPFA Six Acre Standard’.

3.83 The Council has adopted the NPFA standards for outdoor sport and children’s playing space and these standards should normally be met or exceeded in all new housing developments. The standards that developers are required to meet are set out in Appendix 6.

H11

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT OF 15 OR MORE DWELLINGS UNLESS IT MAKES PROVISION FOR PLAYING SPACE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE COUNCIL’S STANDARDS AT APPENDIX 6 OF THIS LOCAL PLAN.


Development Briefs

3.84 In order to provide clear planning guidance to prospective developers of sites allocated for residential development the Council intends to approve a development brief for the New Village at the former Melton Mowbray Airfield.

3.85 Many development briefs have already been approved and published by the Council and provide detailed supplementary planning guidance. In order to ensure that site specific development aims and objectives are achieved, the Policies H12 to H16 below will apply.

Dieppe Way, Melton Mowbray

3.86 This site is about 3.0 hectares in area and forms part of the existing allotment area to the north of Dieppe Way. Many of the allotments within that part of the site allocated for residential development have been disused and overgrown for several years.

3.87 The site is an infill site adjacent Nottingham Road, along which regular bus services operate. It is approximately 1,000 metres north of the edge of Melton Mowbray town centre. The area slopes markedly to the south and west and an open watercourse runs from north to south adjacent the Nottingham Road frontage. There are constraints on the development of this frontage arising from foul sewer infrastructure requirements, the balancing of surface water flows, improvements to the watercourse and the Council's concern to protect an open 'finger' of amenity space 50 metres in width along the east side of Nottingham Road. It is therefore a requirement of any residential development on the allocated site that a landscaped area of public open space along the Nottingham Road frontage is provided within the allocated site.

3.88 Nottingham Road is also a classified, main radial route into Melton Mowbray. The site cannot be accessed from Nottingham Road as there would be insufficient distance between a new access and Dieppe Way and therefore a new access would not comply with the design guidelines of the Local Highway Authority. Housing on the Fairmead Estate to the south of the site largely fronts onto Dieppe Way and the Council also requires frontage housing along Dieppe Way as part of the overall housing layout of the site.

3.89 The Council has also considered the information obtained from its "Housing Need Survey" and addressed the locality, its character and market conditions of the site and concluded that a development should incorporate an element of affordable housing as defined by the Council (see paragraph 3.47 for the Council's definition of affordable housing). The Council will seek to negotiate a 33% provision of affordable housing. In taking account of the site's, location and character, the Council wishes to encourage high density development within the range 25 - 37 units per hectare, which is also consistent with the Council's requirement for a significant proportion of affordable housing as contained in the approved development brief.

3.90 In the light of the above, the following policy will apply:-

H12

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT AT DIEPPE WAY SHOWN ON THE PROPOSALS MAP PROVIDED THE DEVELOPMENT INCLUDES:-

A) THE PROVISION OF A LANDSCAPED AREA OF PUBLIC OPEN SPACE 50 METRES IN WIDTH ALONG THE NOTTINGHAM ROAD FRONTAGE;

B) FRONTAGE HOUSING ALONG DIEPPE WAY;

C) VEHICULAR ACCESS FROM DIEPPE WAY ONLY.

THE COUNCIL WILL SEEK TO NEGOTIATE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT AT A GROSS DENSITY OF 25-37 UNITS PER HECTARE TO INCLUDE 33% PROVISION OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING.


Lake Terrace, Melton Mowbray

3.91 The small site (0.47 hectares) is owned by the Council and is to be developed for affordable housing at a gross density of 30-40 units per hectare. A play area is to be included in view of the lack of facilities for small children in the locality. The Council has approved a detailed site development brief which provides further guidance on the Council’s requirements. The following policy will apply:-

H13

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT AT LAKE TERRACE SHOWN ON THE PROPOSALS MAP PROVIDED THE DEVELOPMENT INCLUDES A CHILDREN'S PLAY AREA.

THE COUNCIL WILL SEEK TO NEGOTIATE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT AT A GROSS DENSITY OF 30-40 UNITS PER HECTARE TO INCLUDE 100% PROVISION OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING.


Scalford Road Farm

3.92 This site fronts onto Scalford Road at the north edge of Melton Mowbray and is some 1.95 hectares in area. The site slopes gently from Scalford Road to a ridge at the west boundary and is presently in agricultural use. To screen the site from the west, substantial tree planting will be required along the west boundary.

3.93 The site fronts a main radial route into Melton Mowbray and bus services operate along this route into the town centre. The Council has considered the information obtained from its "Housing Need Survey" and addressed the location, character and market conditions of the site and concluded that a development should incorporate an element of affordable housing as defined by the Council by (see paragraph 3.47 for the Council's definition of affordable housing). The Council will negotiate a 20% provision of affordable housing. In taking account of the site's location however, overall density should be within the range 20-30 units per hectare. Although densities may vary throughout the site in accordance with house type distribution, higher density development would be appropriate at the eastern end of the site, and lower density development at the more elevated western end.

3.94 Local retail provision in the northern part of Melton Mowbray is distinctly lacking, the nearest convenience shop to the site is some distance away on St. John's Drive. The Council will therefore seek to negotiate the provision of a fully serviced area for retail development at the site's frontage to Scalford Road. In the light of the above, the following policy will apply:-

H14

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT AT SCALFORD ROAD FARM SHOWN ON THE PROPOSALS MAP PROVIDED THE DEVELOPMENT INCLUDES STRUCTURAL LANDSCAPING TO A MINIMUM DEPTH OF 10 METRES ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF THE SITE.

THE COUNCIL WILL SEEK TO NEGOTIATE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT AT A GROSS DENSITY OF 20-30 UNITS PER HECTARE TO INCLUDE 20% PROVISION OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING AND THE PROVISION OF FULLY SERVICED LAND FOR RETAIL DEVELOPMENT AT THE SITE FRONTAGE TO SCALFORD ROAD.


Uplands/Pochins Close

3.95 The main part of this 2 hectare site is allocated in the adopted Melton Mowbray and Asfordby Local Plan 1989 for residential development. The site has a main frontage onto Dalby Road and is close to the edge of Melton Mowbray town centre. The adjacent Uplands development is high density and the Council considers that the site's location and character are such that a high density residential development with special needs housing, is appropriate. The Council has considered the information obtained from its "Housing Need Survey" and has addressed the location, character and market conditions of the site and concluded that a development should incorporate an element of affordable housing. Affordable housing is defined by the Council at paragraph 3.47. The Council will negotiate a minimum of 18 affordable/special needs dwellings on this site in accordance with the requirements of the County Council which owns a substantial part of the site.

3.96 The Council has prepared a development brief for the site which shows how vehicular access can be obtained from Dalby Road or via an improved access from Leicester Road. The site lies adjacent The Mount which is scheduled ancient monument. Any archaeological interest in the site will be safeguarded. For convenient access to bus services and other community facilities, a footpath connection is required via a central open space adjoining the Mount between Pochin Close and Dalby Road:-

H15

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT AT THE UPLANDS / POCHINS CLOSE SHOWN ON THE PROPOSALS MAP PROVIDED THE DEVELOPMENT:-

A) PROVIDES FOR VEHICULAR ACCESS TO THE MAIN PART OF THE SITE FROM DALBY ROAD, VIA THE UPLANDS OR FROM AN IMPROVED ACCESS FROM LEICESTER ROAD;

B) PROVIDES A FOOTPATH CONNECTION VIA A CENTRAL OPEN SPACE ADJOINING THE ANCIENT MONUMENT BETWEEN POCHIN CLOSE AND DALBY ROAD;

C) SAFEGUARDS ANY SIGNIFICANT ARCHAEOLOGICAL INTEREST.

THE COUNCIL WILL SEEK TO NEGOTIATE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT AT A GROSS DENSITY OF 25 - 37 DWELLINGS PER HECTARE AND PROVISION OF A MINIMUM OF 18 AFFORDABLE / SPECIAL NEEDS DWELLINGS.


Melton Mowbray Airfield

3.97 Details of the requirements related to this major new development are set out at Chapter 14.

Jubilee Avenue, Asfordby

3.98 Some 1.45 hectares of this site was allocated in the adopted Melton Mowbray and Asfordby Local plan for housing. The site has now been extended to approximately 2.0 hectares and comprises a grazing meadow lying between existing housing and the A6006 Asfordby bypass.

3.99 Outline planning permission has now been granted at Jubilee Avenue and a number of conditions are to be attached to the planning permission which sets out the Council’s detailed development requirements for the site. The following Policy outlines the main requirements.

H16

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVLOPMENT AT JUBILEE AVENUE, ASFORDBY SHOWN ON THE PROPOSALS MAP PROVIDED THE DEVELOPMENT INCLUDES:-

A) A LANDSCAPE BELT ADJOINING THE ASFORDBY BYPASS RANGING FROM NO LESS THAN 40 METRES DEPTH AT THE WESTERN END OF THE SITE TO NO LESS THAN 23 METRES AT THE EASTERN END OF THE SITE, TOGETHER WITH LANDSCAPING ALONG THE SOUTHERN AND EASTERN BOUNDARIES OF THE SITE;

B) IMPROVEMENTS TO JUBILEE AVENUE, INCLUDING TRAFFIC CALMING MEASURES, TO OVERCOME PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE NARROWNESS OF THE CARRIAGEWAY AND FOOTWAY WIDTHS, ON-STREET PARKING AND VISIBILITY AT THE JUNCTION WITH MAIN STREET;

C) NO DIRECT ACCESS BETWEEN THE SITE AND THE A6006, ASFORDBY BYPASS;

D) NO VEHICULAR ACCESS TO LAND TO THE WEST OF THE SITE;

E) FOLLOWING THE SUBMISSION OF A NOISE ASSESSMENT STUDY, THE IMPLEMENTATION OF NECESSARY MEASURES TO ATTENUATE NOISE POLLUTION FROM THE BYPASS;

THE COUNCIL WILL REQUIRE THE DEVELOPMENT TO BE CONSTRUCTED AT A DENSITY OF NO MORE THAN 27 DWELLINGS PER HECTARE AND WILL SEEK 33% PROVISION OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING.


Access Housing

3.100 Access housing is basically standard house types with special features which provide for the needs of disabled people. Typical features include doorways which are wider than those found in standard housing, ground level toilet provision and staircases designed so that a stair-lift can be easily installed. Such housing therefore provides for adaptations to be carried out without too much upheaval or expense should a member of the family become disabled or infirm.

3.101 The Council's "Housing Need Survey" involved interviewing 99 households where some special housing need was evident. In the light of the need for affordable housing and suitable for people with a disability or special need, the Council will seek to negotiate the provision of such housing as part of the affordable housing elements required in connection with the housing developments proposed at Policy H7. This is not an additional requirement of these developments; the Council will simply wish to refer to evidence of specific housing needs revealed from the "Housing Need Survey" when negotiating the accommodation mix of these schemes.

H17

THE COUNCIL WILL SEEK TO NEGOTIATE THE PROVISION OF ACCESS HOUSING WHERE THERE IS EVIDENCE OF NEED, AS PART OF THE AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROVISION SOUGHT IN CONNECTION WITH THE HOUSING ALLOCATIONS REFERRED TO AT POLICY H7 AND ANY MAJOR UNIDENTIFIED SITES WHICH ARISE DURING THE PLAN PERIOD.


Backland Development

3.102 Most villages in the Plan area have evolved through a process of frontage development in an informal pattern along rural lanes. Long narrow gardens were often a feature of the medieval village pattern and in recent years development pressures have resulted in the building of houses in "backland" locations. In Melton Mowbray there are also pressures for "backland" development. The Council wishes to avoid insensitive backland development recognising that this type of development can have an adverse effect on the amenities of existing dwellings and also the integrity and appearance of the original village pattern or neighbourhood. In some instances "backland" development can be discreetly integrated into the settlement or neighbourhood. In such cases proper provision should be made for convenient and safe vehicular access and car parking. The Council will therefore consider any "backland" proposals with particular regard to these matters and will normally require a comprehensive layout plan showing the relationship of any new dwelling to existing properties as part of a planning application.

H18

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR BACKLAND HOUSING DEVELOPMENT WITHIN THE TOWN OR VILLAGE ENVELOPES SHOWN ON THE PROPOSALS MAP PROVIDED:-

A) THE PRIVACY AND AMENITY OF OCCUPANTS IN EXISTING DWELLINGS IN THE LOCALITY OR FUTURE OCCUPANTS OF THE PROPOSED DWELLING WOULD NOT BE ADVERSELY AFFECTED;

B) ACCESS AND PARKING FACILITIES ARE PROVIDED IN ACCORDANCE WITH POLICY T2 OF THE PLAN;

C) THE DEVELOPMENT WOULD BE IN KEEPING WITH THE GENERAL CHARACTER AND DENSITY OF EXISTING DEVELOPMENT IN THE LOCALITY AND WOULD NOT SET A PRECEDENT FOR SIMILAR FORMS OF DEVELOPMENT, THE CUMULATIVE EFFECT OF WHICH WOULD ADVERSELY AFFECT THE EXISTING CHARACTER AND APPEARANCE OF THE WIDER AREA.

Granny Annexe

3.103 Demand for the provision of additional living units, in association with existing residential properties, for aged or infirm relatives has increased over recent years. The 1991 Census results show a significant increase in the number of elderly in the Plan area over the period 1981 to 1991 and suggests that a further increase is likely. At the same time, the Government's White Paper "Caring in the Community" looks for increasing provision to be made for the care of those in need within the wider community.

3.104 Planning permission for the provision of additional living accommodation for the aged in association with existing residential properties lying within the Town and Village Envelopes will normally be granted subject to compliance with Policy OS1. In the countryside planning permission will not normally be granted for development except for the specific, limited forms of development identified at Policy OS2. Residential development will normally be restricted to development essential to the operational requirements of agriculture and forestry (see Policy C8). The Council is aware that inappropriate development in the countryside may arise if planning permission is granted for self contained accommodation for the use of aged or infirm people where there is potential for its subsequent conversion to form a separate residential unit. Therefore, the Council will normally require accommodation to be physically linked to an existing residential unit with which it is associated. The 'annexe' should also be subordinate to the main residential property and of suitable scale, form, mass and architectural detailing so as to be in keeping with the existing residential property and in accordance with the criteria contained in Policy C11. The following policy will apply:-

H19

OUTSIDE THE TOWN AND VILLAGE ENVELOPES SHOWN ON THE PROPOSALS MAP, PLANNING PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR RESIDENTIAL EXTENSIONS FOR AGED OR INFIRM PERSONS IF THE ACCOMMODATION HAS POTENTIAL FOR THE CREATION OF A SEPARATE RESIDENTIAL UNIT.

3.105 There may be situations where the use of a legal agreement to restrict the use of the granny annexe may be appropriate. The Council will only seek such an agreement if it is likely to serve a useful purpose in land use planning terms (which cannot be secured by appropriate planning conditions) since there are now provisions for an appeal to the Secretary of State for the Environment for the discharge of such agreements after a prescribed period of time.

Houses in Multiple Occupation

3.106 The conversion of suitable existing dwellings or other buildings to smaller units of accommodation can make a contribution to the overall supply of residential accommodation particularly for single people.

3.107 Of particular concern in dealing with the conversion of properties for multiple occupation is the impact of fire escapes, access to upper floors, waste bin storage, boundary wall treatment and noise disturbance. Although planning permission will not normally be granted for the conversion of buildings of special architectural or historic interest, or buildings in Conservation Areas, where the impact of these features would adversely affect the character of the building or locality, the Council is aware that sensitively designed conversions can provide a lifeline to older, larger properties where there is no demand for single family occupation. Where such properties are vacated and are likely to deteriorate through neglect, the Council will positively encourage sensitive conversion to multiple occupancy. The following policy will apply:-

H20

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR THE CONVERSION OF LARGE HOUSES OR OTHER SUITABLE BUILDINGS TO SMALL UNITS OF RESIDENTIAL ACCOMMODATION PROVIDED:-

A) THE DEVELOPMENT WOULD NOT ADVERSELY AFFECT THE CHARACTER OF THE BUILDING;

B) THERE WOULD BE NO ADVERSE EFFECTS ON RESIDENTIAL AMENITIES;

C) THERE WOULD BE NO LOSS OF ESSENTIAL AMENITY OPEN SPACE;

D) ACCESS AND CAR PARKING PROVISION IS MADE IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE ADOPTED STANDARDS OF THE COUNCIL.


Gypsy Caravan and Travelling Showpeople's Sites

3.108 The Government has recently repealed the legislation which requires local authorities to provide accommodation on caravan sites for gypsies residing in or resorting to their areas as well as the Secretary of State's power to "designate" an area of a local authority as having adequate provision for gypsies. There are no permanent or transient gypsy sites within the Borough at present, and there are only occasional incursions of gypsy caravans into the Borough. Although there is no evidence of demand for facilities at present, the Council considers that, in land use terms, gypsy sites and sites for travelling showpeople are likely to exhibit similar characteristics and the following policy will be applied to assess any planning application submitted for either type of use.

H21

PLANNING PERMISSION WILL BE GRANTED FOR GYPSY CARAVAN AND TRAVELLING SHOW PEOPLE'S SITES PROVIDED:-

A) THERE WOULD BE NO LOSS OF AMENITIES IN THE LOCALITY;

B) SATISFACTORY ACCESS CAN BE PROVIDED;

C) ANY PERMANENT GYPSY SITE WOULD BE WELL LOCATED TO COMMUNITY SERVICES.


Existing Housing Stock

3.109 Analysis of the 1991 Census reveals a low proportion of dwellings in the Borough which can be categorised as "unfit" or lacking in amenities. No Council owned dwelling falls into these categories.

3.110 The Council does not consider it appropriate to designate any Housing Renewal Areas for specific action because of the small number of dwellings requiring improvement and the limited scope for environmental improvement works.

3.111 The Council has a modernisation programme to deal with its own housing stock. The Council also makes provision for improvement grants to be made to private residents living near to Council houses and enables owners to carry out their own improvements whilst the modernisation of the local authority houses is in progress.

3.112 The Council also offers grant aid for the improvement of privately owned accommodation under the 1989 Housing and Local Government Act, subject to the availability of finance. Applicants are assessed with regard to both the condition of the property and the financial resources available to the applicant. Approximately 40-50 dwellings benefit each year from improvement grants.

3.113 The Council will continue to encourage the improvement of older housing within the Borough wherever possible. Details of the Council's proposals in this regard are set out in the Housing Investment Programme which is available for inspection at the Council Offices.

TABLE 6 - SCHEDULE OF HOUSING LAND (large sites only - at 1st April 1995)
Site
Planning Status
Site Area (ha)
Built

No of Dwellings U/C

Outstanding
Density
1. Melton Mowbray Area
         

The Convent, Dalby Rd

F

0.54

 

 

11

20

Dieppe Way

Part O-NA

1.46

 

 

45

25-37

Edendale Road

Part F-EA

15.60

 

 

286

20-30

Framland Phase VI

F

5.70

106

7

18

23

Grantwood Road

F

8.66

139

4

36

21

The Homestead

N/A

1.73

 

 

13

5-10

Kirby Lane

EA

1.70

 

 

34

20

Lake Terrace

NA

0.47

 

 

16

30-40

Longfield Road

O

1.00

 

 

25

25

Newport Lodge

F

0.60

 

 

22

37

Oxford Drive

F

1.20

2

6

10

15

Scalford Road Farm

NA

1.95

 

 

49

20-30

Swale Close

EA

0.82

 

 

22

27

Uplands/Pochin Close

Part EA-NA

2.00

 

 

62

25-37

SUB-TOTAL   43.43 247 17 649 35*
             

Proposed new village at former Melton Mowbray Airfield

NA       700* 20
             

2. Asfordby Area

           

Jubilee Avenue

Part EA-NA

2.00

 

 

54

27

Main Street

F

0.80

 

 

28

35

North Street

F

 

 

 

 

 

Asfordby Valley

EA

0.82

 

 

29

35

SUB TOTAL   3.62     111  
             
3. Bottesford
           

Bowbridge Lane

F

1.68

38

4

 

25

Easthorpe Road

F

0.28

3

 

8

39

Beckingthorpe Road

F

1.68

 

 

26

15.5

The Vineries,Belvoir Road

EA

1.80

 

 

45

20-30

SUB-TOTAL
  5.44 41 4 79  

 

           
4. Rural Area            

Boyers Orchard, Harby

O

0.41

 

 

11

20-30

Windmill Field, Croxton Kerrial

F

1.00

25

2

0

29

New Causeway, Barkestone le Vale

F

0.80

 

 

22

27

Melton Road, Waltham

F/O

1.14

2

1

10

12

Sandpit Lane, Long Clawson

F

1.10

24

 

6

27

Old Dairy, Hose

F

0.30

6

 

4

37

SUB-TOTAL   4.75 57 3 53  
OVERALL TOTAL   91.82 318 22 1592  
             

* This figure represents the proportion of the total development (1200 dwellings) which will be permitted in the Plan period.

Key:

O = Outline Planning Permission

EA = Allocated in Melton Mowbray & Ashfordby Local Plan or Melton (Rural Areas) LocalPlan

NA = New Allocations (Proposed)

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