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The Places of Croydon

This section informs Policy SP1 on the Places and provides the visions and frameworks demonstrating how the borough-wide thematic policies will shape the Places over the plan period up to 2036. It should be noted that where a policy applies to all the Places, to avoid repetition it has not been mentioned in the text. For example Policy SP6 on Climate Change applies to all Places, but only the physical attributes, constraints and measures are identified here.

Furthermore, it is considered the Places provide some context to the possible formulation of Neighbourhood Plans. The Croydon Local Plan 2018 sets out the strategic planning policies that provide the opportunity for the production of Neighbourhood Plans. This will enable communities to influence the planning of their Place, in conformity with the Strategy Policies. All future Development Plan Documents will be carefully managed to ensure their content does not unnecessarily trespass on the intended function of Neighbourhood Plans.

This section also contains the Council's policies that would specifically apply to a Place and all the Detailed Proposals.

The Places appear in alphabetical order from Addington to Waddon.

11. The Places of Croydon

The Place-specific policies

Strategic Objectives and related Croydon Local Plan strategic policies

  • Strategic Objective 5
  • Strategic Objective 7
  • Strategic Objective 8
  • Strategic Objective 10
  • Policy SP1
  • Policy SP2.2
  • Policy SP4.1

 

Why we need these policies

11.1 The main objective of these policies will be to provide additional Place-specific development management policies to provide greater clarity and certainty that proposed developments are in line with the objectives of Croydon Local Plan Strategic Policy SP4. These policies should be read in conjunction with the Borough Character Appraisal including the Character Typology.

11.2 The aspiration to achieve good design while retaining and improving the distinctiveness of each of Croydon's Places has created the need to provide further design detail in the form of Place-specific development management policies. These additional policies will provide greater clarity and provide management guidelines for proposals within District and Local Centres and in locations outside of the masterplan areas, Conservation Areas, Local Heritage Areas or the Croydon Opportunity Area.

11.3 An evaluation of local character was conducted to identify the locations in each of Croydon's 16 Places where Place-specific development management policies would be beneficial.

11.4 The consistent theme within these Places was the need to identify management guidelines for major junctions, District Centres and Local Centres. These additional Place-specific development management policies will only be applicable within the areas identified on the Policies Map.

Designations shown on the Policies Map

The Place-specific development management policies identify specific locations with less consistent character where the criteria of Policies DM34 to DM49 apply. These designations they will are shown on the Policies Map. A list of all Place-specific policies is shown in Table 11.1 and Policies Map has details of all proposed areas where a proposed Place-specific development management policy will apply.

Table 11.1 Proposed Place-specific development management policies (see Policies DM34 to DM49 and The Policies Map for full details)

Place-specific development management policy

Policy ref

New Addington District Centre

DM34.1

Addiscombe District Centre

DM35.1

Area between Addiscombe Railway Park & Lower Addiscombe Road (section between Leslie Park Road & Grant Road)

DM35.2

Broad Green Local Centre

DM36.1

Potential new Local Centre at Valley Park

DM36.2

Area of the Lombard Roundabout

DM36.3

Area north of Broad Green Local Centre

DM36.4

Area of the junction of Windmill Road and Whitehorse Road

DM36.5

Croydon Opportunity Area (all)

DM38.1

Croydon Opportunity Area (New Town and the Retail Core)

DM38.2

Croydon Opportunity Area (Central area)

DM38.3

Croydon Opportunity Area (Edge area)

DM38.4

Croydon Opportunity Area (London Road area)

DM38.5

Croydon Opportunity Area (area along Sydenham and Lansdowne Road

DM38.6

Norbury District Centre

DM41.1

Pollards Hill Local Centre

DM41.2

Purley District Centre and its environs

DM42.1

Environs of Reedham station

DM42.2

Area of the junction of Brighton Road and Purley Downs Road

DM42.3

Sanderstead Local Centre

DM43.1

Hamsey Green Local Centre

DM43.2

Selsdon District Centre

DM44.1

Shirley Local Centre

DM45.1

Area between 518 and 568 Wickham Road

DM45.2

Area of the Wickham Road Shopping Parade

DM45.3

Brighton Road (Selsdon Road) Local Centre

DM46.1

Section of Portland Road between the South Norwood Conservation Area and Watcombe Road

DM47.1

Section of Portland Road between Watcombe Road and Woodside Avenue

DM47.2

Thornton Heath District Centre and environs

DM48.1

Thornton Heath Pond Local Centre and environs

DM48.2

Waddon's potential new Local Centre

DM49.1

 

Addington

Vision, opportunities, constraints and change up to 2036

Vision

11.5 A self-contained community, New Addington and Fieldway, will be a location for growth, capitalising on good links to, and its strategic position between Croydon Metropolitan Centre and Biggin Hill Airport, and their concentration of supporting infrastructure. It will continue to comprise interwar and late 20th Century housing surrounded by Green Belt. The Place will be enhanced with appropriate infill development and a rejuvenated District Centre, with a mixture of homes, community and cultural facilities and a range of retailing, including many independent shops. The Fieldway Neighbourhood Centre will be supporting the existing and future community with services and facilities beyond a retail function. Addington Village will retain its distinct rural character within the Green Belt.

Homes

11.6 With good supporting infrastructure provision opportunities for new development will be mainly infilling as land is physically constrained by the Green Belt. Residential development will respect the existing residential character and local distinctiveness, referring to the Borough Character Appraisal to inform design quality.

Employment, Skills and Community Facilities

11.7 There will be continued protection for industry and warehousing in the Vulcan Way Separated Industrial Location. The District Centre will maintain its support of the local community, providing retailing, some employment and services. The conference centre of Addington Palace also provides further local employment opportunities. Community facilities will be encouraged to focus on the District Centre.

Character, Heritage and Design

11.8 New development will respect the existing local character and local distinctiveness, referring to the Borough Character Appraisal to inform design quality. Public realm improvements will focus on the District Centre to assist in the regeneration of the area with the designated Village Green placed at the centre. Any buildings and conversions should be of a high standard of design to ensure the character of the District Centre and the Conservation Area are respected. The Historic and Local Historic Parks and Gardens in the area will be retained and new links provided where possible to incorporate them into the Green Grid network.

Green Grid and Open Space

11.9 Walking and cycle links to local schools, the District Centre, Vulcan Way industrial location and surrounding open space will be improved where possible. These will connect to the ancient Roman road on the borough boundary with Bromley.

Transport

11.10 The tram, with improved services and investment in rolling stock, will continue to provide a valued link to the Croydon Metropolitan Centre and connections to Central London and Gatwick Airport. The community will enjoy better quality, more frequent and reliable bus services connecting with Croydon Metropolitan Centre. Travel plans will look to ease congestion at peak times by encouraging walking, cycling or public transport especially for school journeys.

 

Figure 11.1 Addington

Figure 11.1 Addington

 

General character

11.11 The character of Addington is defined by extensive areas of Metropolitan Green Belt such as Birch Wood, Frith Wood, Rowdown Wood and North Downs. These green areas provide the setting for the Addington Village; and the 20th century housing estates in New Addington which consist of 'Local Authority Built Housing With Public Realm' and 'Compact Houses On Relatively Small Plots' in Fieldway, both with scattered sections 'Medium Rise Blocks With Associated Grounds' and 'Tower Buildings'.

11.12 Apart from the historic Addington Village, the Place is served by two 'Suburban Shopping Areas', Central Parade in New Addington (the District Centre) and Wayside in Fieldway.

11.13 The spine of Central Parade separates the less green 'Suburban Shopping Area' of New Addington's District Centre from the area containing leisure and community facilities, with a character of 'Institutions With Associated Grounds'. In addition to these character types, Addington has a number of areas, located to the west and east of Central Parade, with an 'Industrial Estate' character. With the exception of Central Parade, these character areas are generally consistent and can be successfully managed through the policies of this Plan.

11.14 The Addington Village Conservation Area incorporates a historic village with medieval origins in a rural setting. The village's architecture represents a variety of character types from various historical periods. The predominant types are: 'Scattered Houses On Large Plots' and 'Detached Houses On Relatively Large Plots'.

Policy DM34: Addington

DM34.1 Within the New Addington District Centre, to ensure that the District Centre characteristics are respected and enhanced proposals should:

  1. Make use of opportunities to create buildings with a larger footprint to the west of Central Parade; or
  2. Create buildings with smaller footprints that complement existing predominant building heights of 3 storeys up to 12 storeys within Central Parade.

 

DM34.2 Within Addington allocate sites for development as set out in Table 11.2.


How the policy works

New Addington District Centre

11.15 The area in which DM34.1 applies is shown on the Policies Map.

11.16 The 'Suburban Shopping Area' character on Central Parade is characterised by consistent building lines, setbacks and rhythm of facades and fenestration. This uniformity can be managed through other policies in the Croydon Local Plan However, additional policies are required to manage the area to the west of Central Parade where there are precedents of large and tall buildings. This location presents opportunities for growth through the creation of large or tall buildings.

Allocating land for development

11.17 Table 11.2 below sets out the proposed use on specific sites in Addington. The location and boundary of each detailed proposal can be found on the Policies Map and further details including indicative phasing and indicative number of homes (if applicable) can be found in Appendix 7.

Table 11.2 Proposals for uses of land of specific sites in Addington

Ref no

Site name

Proposed use

44

Central Parade West, Central Parade

Mixed development including residential, community, healthcare facility, leisure, retail and open space

120

Timebridge Community Centre, Field Way

Secondary School buildings (with playing fields in adjacent Green Belt)

 

Addiscombe

Vision, opportunities, constraints and change up to 2036

Vision

11.18 Addiscombe will continue to be centred on the vibrant District Centre with an historic Conservation Area, a mixture of homes, community and cultural facilities and a range of retailing including many independent shops. Ashburton Park and Lower Addiscombe Road/Cherry Orchard Road Neighbourhood Centres will be supporting the existing and future community with services and facilities beyond a retail function. Addiscombe will continue to provide for a large residential community with good accessibility to Croydon Metropolitan Centre, and through tram and rail networks, good connections to London and Bromley.

Homes

11.19 Sustainable growth of the suburbs including some opportunity for windfall sites, and limited infilling with dispersed integration of new homes that respect existing residential character and local distinctiveness.

Employment, Skills and Community Facilities

11.20 Recognising Addicombe's retail vitality and potential, the central shopping area has been re-designated as a District Centre. Community facilities will be encouraged to locate in close proximity to the District Centre.

Character, Heritage and Design

11.21 New development will respect the existing local character and distinctiveness referring to the Borough Character Appraisal to inform design quality. Addiscombe's designated heritage assets and landmarks will be protected. Opportunities for public realm improvements will primarily focus on the District Centre with building and conversion works of a high standard of design to ensure the character of the Centre and Conservation Areas are respected.

Green Grid and Open Space

11.22 Improvements to, and expansion of the Green Grid will be sought to promote strategic east-west and north-south links through Addiscombe Linear Railway and Ashburton Parks. These will connect with the Croydon Metropolitan Centre, Wandle Valley Regional Park, Lloyd Park and South Norwood Country Park.

Transport

11.23 Addiscombe will continue to be a highly accessible Place with its six tram stops and connections to East Croydon, Beckenham Junction and Elmers End railway stations. It will benefit from improved tram services, from investment in tram stock and more frequent services. Travel plans will look to ease congestion at peak times by encouraging walking, cycling or public transport especially for school journeys.

Figure 11.2 Addiscombe

Figure 11.2 Addiscombe

 

General character

11.24 Addiscombe is a suburban residential settlement, framed by green areas on the eastern side and the high density Croydon Opportunity Area to the west. This Place is influenced by and evolved as an extension of the Croydon Metropolitan Centre. The non-residential character consists of 'Urban Shopping Areas' (concentrated along the Lower Addiscombe Road corridor and the Shirley Road/Bingham Road Junction); and 'Industrial Estates' within the interiors of blocks, interlaced with houses.

11.25 The residential character consists of a varied yet balanced mix of 'Terraced Houses And Cottages' in the north west of this Place, mix of 'Medium Rise Blocks With Associated Grounds' and 'Compact Houses On Relatively Small Plots' in the south west (between East Croydon and the Addiscombe tram stop and Lloyd Park, 'Detached Houses On Relatively Large Plots' in south east and 'Local Authority Built Housing With Public Realm' in the north. Some isolated residential 'Tower Buildings' and 'Large Buildings With Spacing' are scattered in the centre, in the vicinity of Lower Addiscombe Road.

11.26 The East India Estate Conservation Area protects and preserves the historic character of 'Large Houses On Relatively Small Plots'. The Conservation Area covers a distinctive layout and architecture of residential suburb built on land owned and occupied by the former East India Trading Company Military Academy.

11.27 The St Bernards Conservation Area contains 'Compact Houses On Relatively Small Plots'. It is a notable section of the Park Hill Estate completed in 1971 to an award winning international design by Swiss firm Atelier 5.

11.28 The Addiscombe College Estate Local Heritage Area designation recognises the historical significance of the collection of preserved Victorian houses built between 1862 and 1900 on the land belonging to East India Trading Company. It represents mix of 'Terraced Houses And Cottages' and 'Large Houses On Relatively Small Plots'.

11.29 Bingham Road Local Heritage Area designation recognises the heritage significance of the authentic and distinctive architecture of the Edwardian Addiscombe, 'Planned Estates Of Semi-Detached Houses'.

Policy DM35: Addiscombe

DM35.1 Within the Addiscombe District Centre, to ensure that the District Centre characteristics are respected and enhanced proposals should:

  1. Complement existing predominant building heights of 2 storeys up to 4 storeys and a maximum of 5 storeys around the Lower Addiscombe Road and Blackhorse Lane Junction;
  2. Retain the rhythm, size and the continuity of ground floor active frontages1 ;
  3. Allow flexibility at first floor and above for mixed use;
  4. Retain, enhance and positively reference corner features such as the articulation of corner buildings and architectural features such as domed projecting bays with finials and the projecting double gable ends running at 90 degree angles interrupting the running cornices;
  5. Incorporate or retain traditional shop front elements such as stall risers fascias and pilasters; and
  6. Incorporate multi-stock brick as the predominant facing materials of the whole building.

 

DM35.2 In the area between Addiscombe Railway Park & Lower Addiscombe Road (Section between Leslie Park Road & Grant Road), to ensure changes to the character of this area are carried out in a way that strikes a balance between enhancing the existing character and facilitating growth, proposals should:

  1. Retain the predominant residential building lines and the open character of front gardens;
  2. Respond to the fine grain2 of the existing residential developments;
  3. Complement the existing predominant building heights of 3 storeys up to 4 storeys;
  4. Incorporate multi-stock brick and white render as the predominant facing materials of the whole building; and
  5. Enhance existing and provide new direct public walking and cycling routes to Addiscombe Railway Park by working with the Council and its partners to incorporate sections of the route as part of schemes.

 

DM35.3 Within Addiscombe allocate sites for development as set out in Table 11.3.

 

How the policy works

11.30 The areas in which Policies DM35.1 and DM35.2 apply are shown on the Policies Map.

 

Addiscombe District Centre

11.31 The character of Addiscombe District Centre is defined by the predominance of the 'Urban Shopping Area' character along the northern side of Lower Addiscombe Road. The beginning and end of this character is marked by two triangular urban spaces.

11.32 Addiscombe District Centre has managed to retain the village feel that contributes to its distinctive sense of place. The fine urban grain and consistent rhythm, frontage widths and setback of the buildings reinforce the relationship with the architecturally consistent Victorian and Edwardian 'Terraced Houses And Cottages' sited on the southern side of Lower Addiscombe Road.

11.33 The Lower Addiscombe Road/Inglis Road junction area has a distinctive block composition and architectural detailing. The junctions are defined by symmetrical buildings with consistent heights and strongly defined corners. Detailing, such as domed projecting bays with finials and the projecting double gable ends running at 90 degree angles interrupting the running cornices, contributes to Addiscombe's distinctiveness. Additionally, features, such as the articulation of corner buildings including ground floor entrances that address corners, are a characteristic feature throughout the District Centre and should be referenced.

11.34 The western section of the 'Urban Shopping Area' has a distinct non-residential appearance. This is reflected in the building heights and facing materials which are predominantly red multi stock brick. The eastern side mirrors the character of the adjacent residential areas. These buildings have ground floors that have been converted into commercial premises, whilst preserving the residential appearance of the upper floors. The treatment of facades of these buildings gradually changes from multi stock brick to render. In order to preserve the distinction in appearance between the residential areas and the District Centre, new development should be encouraged to incorporate multi-stock brick.

11.35 The Lower Addiscombe Road/Blackhorse Lane junction area is a formal, well defined urban public space framed on three sides by buildings with a predominant height of two to five storeys.

11.36 The District Centre location and good transport links provides opportunities for densification of up to 5 storeys, preferably in locations on corner plots. It is considered that the retention of small traditional type shop frontages (including stall riser's fascias and pilasters) reinforces the distinctiveness of Addiscombe District Centre. Therefore it would not be appropriate to incorporate large and tall buildings within this location. Policy DM35.1 balances the need to facilitate growth and respect the existing character.

11.37 This policy seeks to retain the continuity of plot widths, setbacks and traditional shop frontages (in line with the Shop Front Security Addendum to Supplementary Planning Guidance No.1 Shop Fronts & Signs). This should not preclude growth, as growth may be still be achieved through creative design solutions such as amalgamating shop units to create one larger unit.

Area between Addiscombe Railway Park & Lower Addiscombe Road (Section between Leslie Park Road & Grant Road)

11.38 In this area the character of consists of 'Industrial Estates', 'Mixed Flats And Compact Houses', and sections of 'Terraced Houses And Cottages' and 'Local Authority Housing with Public Realm'.

11.39 The character of this area has become fragmented as a result of development with an (urban) grain that is not in keeping with the character of the neighbouring buildings. This area is still undergoing change which will need to be managed. Policy DM35.2 will provide guidance to enable this to be carried out in a sensitive way.

Allocating land for development

11.40 Table 11.3 below sets out the proposed use on specific sites in Addiscombe. The location and boundary of each detailed proposal can be found on the Policies Map and further details including indicative phasing and indicative number of homes (if applicable) can be found in Appendix 7.

Table 11.3 Proposals for uses of land of specific sites in Addiscombe

Ref no

Site name

Proposed use

68

130 Oval Road

Residential development

116

Rees House & Morland Lodge, Morland Road

Secondary School

474

Rear of The Cricketers, 47 Shirley Road

Residential development

 

Broad Green and Selhurst

Vision, opportunities, constraints and change up to 2036

Vision

11.41 Broad Green and Selhurst comprise three distinct areas, characterised by Purley Way, a regenerated London Road and Whitehorse Road. As a broad location, growing residential areas will be interspersed within a network of busy streets with improved connectivity to open spaces and the expanded Green Grid network of the borough. Selhurst Road and Sumner Road/London Road Neighbourhood Centres will be supporting the existing and future community with services and facilities beyond a retail function The diversity of employment activity and cultures will enliven the area just north of the Croydon Opportunity Area, as well as being part of the borough's principal industrial location the Place will have a share in the borough's improving prosperity.

Homes

11.42 New residential growth, with opportunities for renewal, will focus on London Road with a possible Local Centre at Valley Park, Ampere Way, off Purley Way. Residential development will respect the existing residential character and local distinctiveness.

Employment, Skills and Community Facilities

11.43 The three integrated Industrial Locations at Union Road, Gloucester Road and Thornton Road will continue to be provided with protection for industrial and warehousing activities, alongside an allowance for limited new high quality residential development provided it does not harm the area's business function. Purley Way, a Strategic Industrial Location and industrial heartland of the borough, will remain a preferred area for industrial and warehousing activity. Local employment is also provided by the Place's proximity to Croydon University Hospital. A thriving evening economy will be centred on the regenerated London Road running from West Croydon to the re-built Local Centre at Broad Green. The BRIT School, in Selhurst, will continue to be a unique and much valued educational asset to the borough.

Character, Heritage and Design

11.44 New development will respect the existing local character and distinctiveness of Broad Green and Selhurst, referring to the Borough Character Appraisal to inform design quality. Opportunities for public realm improvements will primarily focus on the re-built Local Centre at Broad Green on London Road with any building and conversions of a high standard of design to ensure the future vitality of the centre.

Green Grid and Open Space

11.45 New Green Grid links will be sought to improve connectivity with the green space of Wandle Park, just south of Broad Green, with Croydon Cemetery and Mitcham Common all linking to the Wandle Valley Regional Park. Emphasis will be placed on improving access to and quality of the local open spaces within and adjacent to Broad Green as this is identified as an area deprived of access to nature.

Transport

11.46 To encourage walking and cycling, high quality connections within an attractive environment will be pursued. The tram system in Croydon will be further supported by promoting a new line to Streatham, Brixton and Tooting that follows the London Road through the Local Centre. As the attraction of the Croydon Metropolitan Centre increases, the quality, capacity and reliability of bus services connecting to it will also be improved. Travel plans will look to ease congestion at peak times by encouraging walking, cycling or public transport especially for school journeys.

 

Figure 11.3 Broad Green and Selhurst

Figure 11.3 Broad Green and Selhurst

 

General character

11.47 Broad Green is a heavily urbanised area consisting of a variety of local character types. The south-western edge is defined by large 'Retail Estates & Business & Leisure Parks' along Purley Way and the greenery of Archbishop Lanfranc's playing field and Croydon Cemetery. The dominant and high density area along London Road corridor identifies the centre of this Place. The eastern edge is dominated by the railway and associated 'Industrial Estates' of the Selhurst area. Smaller scale historical industrial estates are often interlaced within the urban fabric. The predominant residential character type is 'Terraced Houses And Cottages', with scattered areas of 'Local Authority Housing With Associated Public Realm' with sections of 'Compact Houses On Relatively Small Plots' and 'Medium Rise Blocks With Associated Grounds' scattered in the east and in the vicinity of Whitehorse Road. 'Large Buildings With Continuous Frontage Line' and 'Large Buildings With Spacing' dominate along London Road.

11.48 The London Road Broad Green Local Heritage Area represents an 'Urban Shopping Area'. It includes buildings with unique Arts and Crafts inspired architectural design from the beginning of the 20th century.

11.49 Henderson Road Local Heritage Area is a distinctive example of 'Terraced Houses And Cottages' character. The designation recognises the heritage significance these well-preserved terraces of small Victorian maisonettes adjacent to the Local Historic Park of Whitehorse Recreational Ground.

Policy DM36: Broad Green and Selhurst

DM36.1 Within the Broad Green Local Centre, to ensure that proposals positively enhance and strengthen the character of Broad Green Local Centre, and facilitate growth, developments should:

  1. Sympathetically relate to the predominant building massing within the Local Centre boundaries;
  2. Positively reference, respect and enhance architectural features such as the consistent rhythm and articulation of windows and doors;
  3. Complement the existing predominant building heights of 2 storeys up to a maximum of 4 storeys; and
  4. Incorporate multi-stock brick as the predominant facing materials of the whole building.

 

DM36.2 Within the area of the potential new Local Centre at Valley Park, to ensure development opportunities including public realm improvements are undertaken in a cohesive and coordinated manner and that they result in the creation of a Local Centre with a sense of place and distinct character, a masterplan with elements of design code will be developed.

DM36.3 In the area of the Lombard Roundabout, to facilitate growth and to enhance the distinctive character of the Lombard Roundabout Area proposals should:

  1. Complement the existing predominant building heights of 3 storeys up to a maximum of 6 storeys;
  2. Create a sense of continuity by setting back buildings from the street and create building lines and frontages which positively reference and respond to the junction;
  3. Address the deficiency in green infrastructure within the area by incorporating tree planting and greenery within the development; and
  4. Retain the extent and enhance the quality of the existing public realm within the development, including introducing large trees and other vegetation to balance the impact of large or tall buildings.

 

DM36.4 In the area north of Broad Green Local Centre, to ensure that proposals enhance and strengthen the character of the area north of the Broad Green Local Centre, and facilitate growth, developments should:

  1. Retain and create glimpses and separation distances between buildings in order to improve the openness of London Road;
  2. Incorporate main pedestrian entrances onto London Road;
  3. Complement the existing predominant building heights of 3 storeys up to a maximum of 8 storeys; and
  4. Retain the extent and enhance the quality of the existing public realm within the development, including introducing large trees and other vegetation to balance the impact of large and tall buildings.

 

DM36.5 In the area of the junction of Windmill Road and Whitehorse Road, to create a sense of place of this area proposals should:

  1. Create building lines and frontages which positively reinforce and respond to the form of the junction;
  2. Use tree planting to reinforce the street alignment; and
  3. Complement the existing massing of the immediate area around the Windmill/Whitehorse Road Junction, by ensuring that the overall height of the building does not exceed 5 storeys; or complement the existing predominant building heights of 2 storeys up to a maximum height of 3 storeys; or ensure the ridge line is no taller than those adjacent to it.

 

DM36.6 Within Broad Green and Selhurst allocate sites for development as set out in Table 11.4.

 

How the policy works

11.50 The areas in which Policies DM36.1 to DM36.5 apply are shown on the Policies Map.

Broad Green Local Centre

11.51 Broad Green Local Centre is dominated by the London Road traffic. It is an area with potential for growth.

11.52 The edge of the Broad Green Local Centre is eroding and is beginning to lose its separate identity and sense of place. This could lead to the Local Centre being amalgamated into the homogenous urban form of the London Road.

11.53 The detailed policies in DM36.1 will help to strengthen the identity of the Local Centre by setting design parameters such as consistent scale, street frontage treatment and public realm requirements.

Potential new Local Centre at Valley Park

11.54 The area is currently dominated by large scale 'Retail Estates & Business & Leisure Parks' and associated parking, separated from the adjoining area by embankments, Purley Way and the tram infrastructure.

11.55 There is a mix of uses similar to an urban centre. However, large amounts of car dominated spaces make this area less pedestrian and cycle friendly. Additionally, the presence of large undefined spaces has contributed to this area's lack of a sense of place.

11.56 There is potential for growth and for transformation into a new Local Centre. To enable potential development opportunities to be undertaken in a cohesive and coordinated manner, a masterplan will be considered.

Lombard Roundabout area

11.57 This is an area at the edge of two character types that contrast in scale. These are 'Terraced Houses And Cottages' and 'Large Buildings With Continuous Frontage Line'. The area has potential for growth. The Place-specific development management policy is required to facilitate growth that enhances the distinctive character of the Lombard Roundabout Area.

11.58 These policies will encourage new developments to establish a transitional zone between the existing uniform low rise residential areas and the larger scale structures around the Lombard Roundabout.

Area north of Broad Green Local Centre

11.59 The area north of Broad Green Local Centre is already experiencing growth. A cohesive approach needs to be taken to ensure that Local Centre edge is well defined and that the buildings along London Road have spacing.

Area of the junction of Windmill Road and Whitehorse Road

11.60 There is a poor relationship between the street layout and the building frontages at the Windmill Road/Whitehorse Road junction area. This has resulted in an area lacking a sense of place. The character within this area is a mix of low rise 'Terraced Houses And Cottages', 'Industrial Estates' and 'Retail Estates & Business & Leisure Parks'.

11.61 There is a potential for growth and an opportunity for improving the definition of frontages and street edge, as well as overall quality of urban environment. This could include addressing the deficiency in green infrastructure by ensuring tree planting and greenery is an intrinsic part of the development.

Allocating land for development

11.62 Table 11.4 below sets out the proposed use on specific sites in Broad Green and Selhurst. The location and boundary of each detailed proposal can be found on the Policies Map and further details including indicative phasing and indicative number of homes (if applicable) can be found in Appendix 7.

Table 11.4 Proposals for uses of land of specific sites in Broad Green and Selhurst

Ref no

Site name

Proposed use

78

114-118 Whitehorse Road

Residential conversion and extension

157

Canterbury Mill, 103 Canterbury Road

New primary school

314

Valley Park (B&Q and Units A-G Daniell Way), Hesterman Way

Redevelopment of this area to a mixture of residential, retail, healthcare facility (if required by the NHS), community and leisure to form the basis of a new residential community and local centre

334

Valley Leisure Park, Hesterman Way

Redevelopment of this area to a mixture of residential, retail, healthcare facility (if required by the NHS), community and leisure to form the basis of a new residential community and local centre.

337

Zodiac Court, 161-183 London Road

Residential redevelopment

348

Homebase & Matalan stores, 60-66 Purley Way

Mixed use residential and retail development

396

Praise House, 145-149 London Road

Redevelopment for mixed use residential and community use

404

Vistec House & 14 Cavendish Road, 185 London Road

Residential development

416

Challenge House, 618 Mitcham Road

Residential redevelopment or conversion. Conversion would need to adhere to Local Plan and London Plan Standards to improve the sustainability of the development.

471

Masonic Hall car park, 1- 1B Stanton Road

Residential development

517

Milton House, 2-36 Milton Avenue

Residential and employment uses

 

Coulsdon

Vision, opportunities, constraints and change up to 2036

Vision

11.63 Croydon's southernmost District Centre, with a mixture of homes, community and cultural facilities, and a range of retailing including many independent shops, will revive its day and evening economy with the support of the new residential community and associated facilities on the Cane Hill site. The Strategic Industrial Location of Marlpit Lane will be retained.

Homes

11.64 An area of moderate residential growth based on available land will be focussed on the District Centre and its surrounding area with a new residential community, delivered in Cane Hill. Residential development will respect the existing character and local distinctiveness.

Employment, Skills and Community Facilities

11.65 Marlpit Lane, with its close proximity to the M25 and good separation from surrounding residential areas will remain an important location for employment growth for Croydon and London retaining strong protection (as a Strategic Industrial Location). The District Centre will continue to support the local community, providing retailing, employment and services with further opportunities for skilled employment where possible, within the Coulsdon Area including Cane Hill. Community facilities will be encouraged to locate in close proximity to the District Centre.

Character, Heritage and Design

11.66 Coulsdon will remain mainly residential with tree-lined streets becoming more urban in character towards the District Centre. New development will respect the existing local character and distinctiveness of Coulsdon, referring to the Borough Character Appraisal to inform design quality. The Local Historic Parks and Gardens in the area will be retained and new links provided where possible to incorporate them into the Green Grid network. Opportunities for public realm improvements will continue to focus on enhancements to the Cane Hill area and the District Centre, with any buildings and conversions of a high standard of design to ensure the character of the Centre is respected.

Environment and Climate Change

11.67 Coulsdon District Centre and the surrounding area may be suitable for a district heat network.

Green Grid and Open Space

11.68 Opportunities for orbital movements for walking and cycling will be sought with way finding and provision of new links and connections to the strategic Green Grid. Coulsdon Memorial Ground, a Local Historic Park, and links to it, will be improved as part of a parks improvement scheme.

Transport

11.69 New cycle facilities will be introduced at Coulsdon Town railway station. Linkages with the railway stations of Coulsdon South and Coulsdon Town and the District Centre will be improved to provide links to an expanded Green Grid network and to encourage sustainable modes of travel. Accessibility will be improved where possible to local stations. As the number of jobs and services in the Croydon Metropolitan Centre increase, the capacity and reliability of bus services connecting the Coulsdon community to the Metropolitan Centre will be improved. Travel plans will look to ease congestion at peak times by encouraging walking, cycling or public transport especially for school journeys.

Figure 11.4 Coulsdon

Figure 11.4 Coulsdon

General character

11.70 Coulsdon is a small suburban settlement surrounded by areas of Green Belt. The Green Belt in this area is characterised by open views of open spaces and wooded mature tree belts. Coulsdon's District Centre has a well-defined and consistent 'Urban Shopping Area' character and two parallel strips containing 'Retail Estates & Business & Leisure Parks' and 'Industrial Estates' separated by the bypass and railway lines.

11.71 Coulsdon's built environment is located within the valleys alongside railway lines and main roads. The predominant residential characters are 'Detached Houses On Relatively Large Plots With Minimum Public Realm' to the north and east, an estate of 'Compact Houses On Relatively Small Plots' to the east, 'Planned Estates Of Semi Detached Houses' with garages, and low density, 'Scattered Houses On Large Plots' in the south.

11.72 The Chipstead Valley Road (St Dunstan's Cottages) Local Heritage Area designation recognises the distinctive architecture of workers' houses from c.1900 representing the 'Terraced Houses And Cottages' character. Their layout reveals the location of the historic site of the former Surrey Iron Railway.

11.73 The Station Approach (Coulsdon) Local Heritage Area represents the 'Terraced Houses And Cottages' character. It contains modest Victorian railway cottages with aesthetic style inspired features set in the distinctive townscape.

11.74 The Dutch Village Local Heritage Area has the 'Detached Houses On Relatively Large Plots' character. This distinctive estate was designed by the Dutch architect Wouter Hamdorff as a 'modern Dutch garden village' in late 1930's.

Policy DM37: Coulsdon

Within Coulsdon allocate sites for development as set out in Table 11.5.

 

How the policy works

11.75 Coulsdon has the potential for growth. Much of this is concentrated within the Cane Hill area.

11.76 The District Centre and environs is an area with a broad mix of uses. This has resulted in a variety of character areas with diverse set of transitions between characters.

11.77 Coulsdon District Centre is well served by public transport. This provides an opportunity for it to function as a destination. The sense of place requires strengthening and enhancing of its attractiveness to residents and those visiting the area.

11.78 Each of the character areas within Coulsdon is well defined and consistent. Future development can be successfully guided by general policies and there is no place specific development management policy for this area.

Allocating land for development

11.79 Table 11.5 below sets out the proposed use on specific sites in Coulsdon. The location and boundary of each detailed proposal can be found on the Policies Map and further details including indicative phasing and indicative number of homes (if applicable) can be found in Appendix 7.

Table 11.5 Proposals for uses of land of specific sites in Coulsdon

Ref no

Site name

Proposed use

60

Cane Hill Hospital Site, Farthing Way

Residential development with new community, health and educational facilities

372

Car park, Lion Green Road

Mixed use development comprising leisure, community facilities and retention of car parking spaces. Also retail so long as the current planning permission is extant

945

Waitrose, 110-112 Brighton Road

Residential, retail, car parking (and healthcare facility if required by the NHS)

 

Croydon Opportunity Area

Vision, opportunities, constraints and change up to 2036

Vision

11.80 Croydon Opportunity Area has the greatest potential for positive change and will be a focus for growth through flexible and pragmatic planning, with its improved public realm and open space delivered through a series of masterplans, contributing to the centre's economic prosperity and vitality. It will be home to a new residential community, a thriving employment and renewed retail centre with a new Enterprise Centre and/or Tech Hub focussing on Tech innovation and creative industries. Croydon's connectivity will have continued as its main strength and attraction, being Outer London's largest regional transport hub. Its location at the northern tip of the Gatwick Diamond, alongside its access to people, markets and goods will put Croydon Opportunity Area at the top of the list of successful retail and business centres in the region.

11.81 The Council has produced an Opportunity Area Planning Framework which sets out detailed guidance on how the vision for the Croydon Opportunity Area is to be achieved.

11.82 South End/Parker Road/St Peter's Church Neighbourhood Centre will be supporting the existing and future community with services and facilities beyond a retail function.

Homes

11.83 Residential growth of over 10,650 homes will provide almost one-third of all the new homes in the borough and create a new residential community in the centre of Croydon. High quality residential development will respect the existing residential character and local distinctiveness.

Employment, Skills and Community Facilities

11.84 With a regenerated and revitalised North End/Retail Core at its heart, the Croydon Metropolitan Centre will remain the foremost retail location outside of Central London. The Council will adopt a flexible approach to leisure, visitor accommodation, and housing and community facilities within Croydon Metropolitan Centre. It will be a major office and residential location in London and the South East retaining its status as a Strategic Office Location with up to 92,000m2 of new and refurbished office floor space and an office retention area around East Croydon Station and New Town. It will have a varied evening economy, including the Restaurant Quarter, attracting both new residents of the Croydon Metropolitan Centre and existing residents from across South London. Taking advantage of good links and location relative to the City, West End, Docklands and Gatwick Airport, hotels and conferencing will be a growth sector in the Opportunity Area. A renewed Fairfield Halls will continue to be a major regional arts facility. A new creative industry Enterprise Centre will capitalise on Croydon's local arts scene and Croydon will look to expand upon its existing higher and further education facilities. The GP health centre at Impact House will continue to provide a healthcare facility for Croydon Opportunity Area.

Character, Heritage and Design

11.85 Through the masterplanning process opportunities to improve the public realm of the Opportunity Area will be sought, retaining the best of the existing built environment. New development in the area will respect the existing local character and heritage referring to the Borough Character Appraisal to inform design quality, ensuring that the character for the Conservation Areas are respected, and enhancing the public realm with improved pedestrian connections. The provision of new public realm and public spaces within the Croydon Opportunity Area will serve the daytime community as well as new and existing residents of the area.

Environment and Climate Change

11.86 By enabling development, potential exists to implement flood mitigation and adaptation measures from Old Town towards the Brighton Road. There is also the potential for carbon reduction from a district energy network within Croydon Metropolitan Centre.

Green Grid and Open Space

11.87 Proposed improvements to Wellesley Road and improved east-west links will provide more access to the three major parks on the outskirts of Croydon Opportunity Area, (Wandle Park, Park Hill and Duppas Hill), other Local Historic Parks and Gardens, and the wider Green Grid.

Transport

11.88 Croydon will remain a major interchange on both the National Rail network and London Overground. The masterplans at East and West Croydon will seek to further improve the good access and transport connections including cycle hubs that provide improved facilities. The area will benefit from improved tram services, including the Dingwall Loop, with investment in tram stock, more frequent services and an expanded network. The Council and its partners will seek to improve bus services to and from the Places of Croydon and beyond to ensure capacity increases as the Metropolitan Centre grows. The passenger waiting environment will be enhanced at both East and West Croydon Stations as well as elsewhere in the Metropolitan Centre.

Figure 11.5 Croydon Opportunity Area

Figure 11.5 Croydon Opportunity Area

 

General character

11.89 Croydon Opportunity Area is an urban area with diverse character types. It is the only one of Croydon's 16 Places to contain all nine non-residential character types, each of which influences the way in which this Place has developed. The centre of Croydon is typically characterised by the dominant intersecting 'Linear Infrastructure' of the roads (such as the Wellesley Road, Park Lane and the Flyover) rail and tram lines which create distinct separations between the different character types. The 'Shopping Centres Precincts & Town Centres' and 'Tower Buildings' are located to the west and east of the central spine along Wellesley Road. These areas have a larger grain and predominantly contain modern and contemporary buildings. The character of Wellesley Road has also been influenced by the number of 'Large Buildings With Spacing' which are concentrated to the north and east of this road and in close proximity to the 'Transport Nodes'. There are also a small number of 'Large Buildings With Continuous Frontage Line' located to the south. Radiating southwards from the 'Shopping CentresPrecincts & Town Centres' are the 'Urban Shopping Area' character. The urban grain of these areas reflects the surrounding residential character with a smaller finer grain.

11.90 The residential areas are located around the edge of this place and consist of a predominant mix of 'Large Houses On Relatively Small Plots', 'Terraced Houses And Cottages' and 'Medium Rise Blocks With Associated Grounds'. Interspersed amongst the residential areas are small pockets of 'Industrial Estates', 'Retail Estates & Business & Leisure Parks', and 'Institutions With Associated Grounds'.

11.91 The Central Croydon Conservation Area represents the historic character of 'Urban Shopping Areas'. It is focused on Croydon's historic municipal and commercial heart, including a great variety of historic Listed and Locally Listed Buildings from several centuries.

11.92 The Church Street Conservation Area represents the historic character of 'Urban Shopping Areas'. It is focused on the historic thoroughfare which curves through Croydon's Old Town, linking the High Street with the area around the Croydon Minster. The Conservation Area has a number of Listed and Locally Listed Buildings dated from the early 18th century onwards.

11.93 The Croydon Minster Conservation Area represents the historic character of 'Urban Shopping Areas' and 'Institutions With Associated Grounds'. It is focused on the heart of Croydon's old town, encompassing the highly significant medieval and Victorian Parish Church of St John and the former Archbishop's Palace, both Grade I Listed Buildings.

11.94 The Chatsworth Road Conservation Area represents the authentic residential character of 'Large Houses On Relatively Small Plots'. It contains well-preserved large Victorian and Edwardian houses, in a range of notable styles.

11.95 The Wellesley Road (North) Conservation Area represents the authentic residential character of 'Large Houses On Relatively Small Plots'. It is a collection of early/mid Victorian houses, which are some of the oldest surviving properties in the town centre and a remarkable contrast to the redeveloped adjacent modernist areas.

11.96 The Laud Street Local Heritage Area recognises the heritage significance of its well-preserved historic architecture and townscape of 'Terraced Houses And Cottages' character.

Policy DM38: Croydon Opportunity Area

DM38.1 To enable development opportunities, including public realm improvements, to be undertaken in a cohesive and coordinated manner a Croydon Opportunity Area Planning Framework complemented by masterplans with elements of design code for Fair Field, Mid Croydon, West Croydon, East Croydon and Old Town have been adopted.

DM38.2 To ensure development opportunities positively transform the local character and include public realm improvements that are undertaken in a cohesive and coordinated manner, a masterplan with elements of design code will be considered for the area within New Town and the Retail Core3 .

DM38.3 Within the Central area as shown on Figure 11.6 and on the Policies Map proposals for tall buildings will be considered on their own merits, including a detailed assessment of building form, treatment, urban design and height along with an assessment of the impact on views, heritage assets, shading and environmental impacts.

DM38.4 Within the Edge Area as shown on Figure 11.6 and on the Policies Map, where it can be demonstrated that there will be limited negative impact on sensitive locations and that the form, height, design and treatment of a building are high quality then a tall building may be acceptable. DM38.5 In the London Road area to ensure that proposals positively enhance and strengthen the local character and setting of Locally Listed Buildings, the development should:

  1. Complement the existing maximum height of 4 storeys;
  2. Incorporate multi-stock brick as the predominant facing material;
  3. Retain, enhance and positively reference existing setbacks of the major massing above ground floors; and
  4. Retain, enhance and positively reference architectural detailing on Locally Listed Buildings.

 

DM38.6 In the area along Sydenham and Lansdowne Road, to facilitate growth and enhance the sense of place, developments should retain and create glimpses and separation distances between buildings in order to improve openness within the edge of the town centre.

DM38.7 Within Croydon Opportunity Area allocate sites for development as set out in Table 11.6.

 

How the policy works

11.97 The areas in which Policies DM38.2 to DM38.6 apply are shown on the Policies Map.

11.98 The extent of Croydon Opportunity Area is mostly covered by the Masterplans for Fair Field, Mid Croydon, Old Town, West Croydon and East Croydon which address the complex issues within these areas. With the exception of the London Road area and along Sydenham and Lansdowne Roads the character elsewhere in the opportunity area can be successfully managed by the general policies.

Tall buildings in the Croydon Opportunity Area

11.99 Figure 11.6 below shows the extent of the Central and Edge areas referred to in Policies DM38.3 and DM38.4.

Figure 11.6 Plan of the Central and Edge areas for tall buildings (Policies DM38.3 and DM38.4)

Figure 11.6 Plan of the Central and Edge areas for tall buildings (Policies DM38.3 and DM38.4)

 

London Road area

11.100 London Road is the northern gateway to Croydon Metropolitan Centre. Buildings range from Listed Victorian high street buildings to large modernist residential and commercial buildings along with run down and derelict units. Similarly, there is a mixed quality public realm, from the welcoming and colourful entrance at West Croydon station to large unused spaces and car yards to the north of London Road. West Croydon station, the Lidl supermarket and the proximity of the Retail Core and the University Hospital are some of the major attractions that draw people into the area. The area has been undergoing change due to proximity to the town centre and a major transport interchange of West Croydon station. Additionally a number of redevelopment opportunities have arisen from the civil unrest damages.

11.101 The London Road area has a variety of fine examples of architecture which has been recognised by being designated as Locally Listed Buildings. Though their articulation varies, they have a number of common characteristics such as regular rhythm of elevations marked by windows and the way they are framed, high quality workmanship and materials. There are fine examples of brickwork and render. A number of buildings, which were originally set back from the street, have been extended on the ground floor. These create a feel of openness, more human scale and introduce formal diversity to the street.

11.102 In order to accommodate growth in a way that respects and enhances the diversity of the London Road character, new development should be informed and inspired by these qualities.

Area along Sydenham and Lansdowne Road

11.103 Areas along Sydenham and Lansdowne Road have a very mixed character due to undergoing densification and redevelopment. The original character of 'Large Buildings on Relatively Small Plots' is being gradually replaced with 'Mixed Type Flats'. Residential buildings of a detached form, with spacing between them, set back and forecourts are key features of urban pattern in the area.

11.104 In order to maintain and enhance the distinctive character of the residential edge of the town centre, and to prevent further erosion of it, a cohesive approach needs to be taken to ensure new developments retain and reference this urban pattern.

Allocating land for development

11.105 Table 11.6 below sets out the proposed use on specific sites in Croydon Opportunity Area. The location and boundary of each detailed proposal can be found on the Policies Map and further details including indicative phasing and indicative number of homes (if applicable) can be found in Appendix 7.

Table 11.6 Proposals for uses of land of specific sites in Croydon Opportunity Area

Ref no

Site name

Proposed use

21

Former Royal Mail Sorting Office, 1-5 Addiscombe Road

Residential led mixed use development incorporating either hotel, office, leisure and/or class A2-A5 uses. Also retail so long as the current planning permission is extant.

31

Croydon College car park, College Road

Mixed use redevelopment comprising hotel & residential

32

4-20 Edridge Road

Residential development

50

44-60 Cherry Orchard Road

Residential development

104

Former Taberner House site, Fell Road

Residential development

123

Prospect West and car park to the rear of, 81-85 Station Road

Residential (with healthcare facility if required by NHS). It is recommended that basements are not considered at this site. Further ground investigations would be required at this site to confirm the likelihood of groundwater occurrence. There is one historic record of surface water flooding held by the Council in this location.

138

Cherry Orchard Gardens and site between railway line and Cherry Orchard Road, Cherry Orchard Road

Mixed use development of residential with offices, restaurant/café, hotel and/or community facilities

142

1 Lansdowne Road

Mixed use development comprising residential with offices, leisure and/or hotel

155

St Anne's House & Cambridge House, 20-26 Wellesley Road

Conversion of building to residential and hotel

162

St George's House, Park Lane

Conversion and extension of existing building to provide retail and other Class A activities and/or leisure on the ground floor with residential accommodation on upper floors. There is one historic record of surface water flooding held by the Council in this location.

172

Ruskin Square and surface car park, 61 Dingwall Road and Lansdowne Road

Mixed use development comprising residential, offices, restaurant/café and fitness centre

173

28-30 Addiscombe Grove

Redevelopment to provide more homes

174

30-38 Addiscombe Road

Residential development. It should be noted that ordinary watercourses have not have been included in the fluvial modelling of the River Wandle and therefore a fluvial flood risk from this watercourse may be present. As set out in Section 11.3.2 of the Level 1 SFRA, applicants considering development of this site may need to prepare a simple hydraulic model to enable a more accurate assessment of the probability of flooding associated with this ordinary watercourse to inform the site specific FRA.  This should be carried out in line with industry standards and in agreement with the LLFA.

175

Stephenson House and Knollys House, Cherry Orchard Road

Residential and/or office

178

Arcadia House, 5 Cairo New Road

Residential development

182

St Mathews House, 98 George Street

Redevelopment for residential and/or offices and/or retail (on George Street frontage)

184

1-19 Derby Road

Residential development above, community uses on lower floors

186

Jobcentre, 17-21 Dingwall Road

Offices and/or residential and/or hotel and/or replacement Class A2 (Finance) premises (with healthcare facility if required by the NHS)

187

28 Dingwall Road

Offices and residential and/or hotel (with healthcare facility if required by the NHS)

189

Car parks, Drummond Road

Residential development

190

Car park to the rear of Leon House, 22-24 Edridge Road

Residential development. Self-contained residential basements and bedrooms at basement level are not permitted in areas that have 'potential for groundwater to occur at the surface' (BGS Susceptibility to Groundwater Flooding.

192

Suffolk House, George Street

Mixed use redevelopment with offices or residential dwellings above retail units at ground level

193

100 George Street

Mixed use development with offices or residential dwellings above retail units at ground level

194

St George's Walk, Katharine House and Park House, Park Street

Residential with new civic space and a combination of retail, other Class A uses, leisure and/or office use.

195

Leon House, 233 High Street

Conversion to residential or mixed use residential/office with retention of retail on the ground floor. It should be noted that ordinary watercourses have not have been included in the fluvial modelling of the River Wandle and therefore a fluvial flood risk from this watercourse may be present. Self-contained residential basements and bedrooms at basement level are not permitted in areas that have 'potential for groundwater to occur at the surface' (BGS Susceptibility to Groundwater Flooding).

196

Stonewest House, 1 Lamberts Place

Residential development

197

Emerald House, 7-15 Lansdowne Road

Office and residential and/or hotel (with healthcare facility if required by the NHS)

199

20 Lansdowne Road

Residential development with light industrial workshops and studio spaces

200

Multi-storey car park, Lansdowne Road

Mixed use, public car park and residential

201

Lidl, Easy Gym and car park, 99-101 London Road

Primary school with residential development on upper floors

203

West Croydon station and shops, 176 North End

Remodelling of station and redevelopment to provide an improved transport interchange, cycle hub, retail & office units with residential development above. In the surrounding area, surface water flood risk is generally low. However, Station Road and the A212 have areas shown to be at high risk from surface water flooding. There are two historic records of surface water flooding held by Croydon Council in this location.

211

Poplar Walk car park and, 16-44 Station Road

A more intensive use of the site with 232 residential units as part of an overall redevelopment of the site which includes reprovision of retail uses, car and cycle parking and a public square.

218

Lunar House, Wellesley Road

Office and residential and/or hotel (with healthcare facility if required by the NHS) if the site is no longer required by the Home Office.

220

9-11 Wellesley Road

Residential and/or hotel and/or retail and/or finance

222

Multi-storey car park, 1 Whitgift Street

Residential with community facilities commensurate in size and functionality to that currently on the site

231

Segas House, Park Lane

Residential conversion with cultural uses if required (with town centres uses considered if there is no interest in delivery of cultural uses).

234

Southern House, Wellesley Grove

Offices and residential and/or hotel (with healthcare facility if required by the NHS)

236

Apollo House, Wellesley Road

Offices and residential and/or hotel (with healthcare facility if required by the NHS) if the site is no longer required by the Home Office. There is one record of sewer flooding.

242

Davis House, Robert Street

Residential development with limited retail to replace existing floor space

245

Mondial House, 102 George Street

Office and/or residential development or offices or hotel and/or retail (on George Street frontage)

247

Norwich Union House, 96 George Street

Offices with residential development or hotel and/or retail (on George Street frontage)

294

Croydon College Annexe, Barclay Road

Residential redevelopment with community uses and Creative and Cultural Industries Enterprise Centre. There is one record of sewer flooding.

311

Mott Macdonald House, 8 Sydenham Road

Offices and residential and/or hotel (with healthcare facility if required by the NHS)

374

Reeves Corner former buildings, 104-112 Church Street

Mixed use with residential to upper storeys and retail on ground floor. Self-contained residential basements and bedrooms at basement level are not permitted in areas that have 'potential for groundwater to occur at the surface' (BGS Susceptibility to Groundwater Flooding). A high risk of surface water flooding surrounds the site, particularly across the road network such as Cairo New Road and Church Street. There is one historic record of surface water flooding held by Croydon Council in this location.

375

Northern part of 5 Cairo New Road

Residential redevelopment above community use. The surrounding areas of Cairo New Road and Roman Way are shown to be at a high risk of surface water flooding.

392

Carolyn House, 22-26 Dingwall Road

Offices and residential and/or hotel (with healthcare facility if required by the NHS)

393

Whitgift Centre, North End

Expansion of shopping centre, improved public realm and residential development and car parking provision. The majority of the site is shown to be at a very low risk. The surrounding areas are generally at a low risk of surface water flooding with the areas of the road network (i.e. Wellesley Road) being shown to be at high risk. There are three historic records of surface water flooding and one historic record of sewer flooding.

398

Coombe Cross, 2-4 South End

Residential development. It should be noted that ordinary watercourses have not have been included in the fluvial modelling of the River Wandle and therefore a fluvial flood risk from this watercourse may be present. There are further areas of medium risk of surface water flooding to the west of the site. The surrounding area is generally an area of low to medium surface water flood risk. However, there are areas of high risk in regards to surface water flooding in areas such as Parker Road and South End. There are two historic records of surface water flooding.

417

Stonemead House, 95 London Road

Residential

488

Canius House, 1 Scarbrook Road

Residential conversion

489

Corinthian House, 17 Lansdowne Road

Retention of offices with residential conversion, and/or hotel (with healthcare facility if required by the NHS)

492

5 Bedford Park

Residential conversion

493

Pinnacle House, 8 Bedford Park

Mixed use of residential with offices (or a healthcare facility if required by the NHS) on the ground floor

522

Surface car park, Wandle Road

Bus stand underneath the flyover and a district energy centre and residential development on the remainder of the car park. The majority of the site is within Flood Zone 3a to the south-west and the rest of the site are within Flood Zone 1. This More Vulnerable development should be preferably located in Flood Zone 1. If it is essential to build on Flood Zone 3a, then all residential uses should be located in the first floor level or above. Self-contained residential basements and bedrooms at basement level are not permitted in areas that have 'potential for groundwater to occur at the surface' (BGS Susceptibility to Groundwater Flooding).

950

Norfolk House, 1-28 Wellesley Road

Mixed use development to include retail, residential, office and hotel uses.

 

Crystal Palace and Upper Norwood

Vision, opportunities, constraints and change up to 2036

Vision

11.106 The vibrant historic centre, sitting at the apex of four London boroughs, will offer a mixture of homes, community, cultural and leisure facilities; a range of retailing including many independent shops; an employment hub with a thriving arts and creative scene centred on a new Enterprise Centre. The South Norwood Hill Neighbourhood Centre will be supporting the existing and future community with services and facilities beyond a retail function. The good transport links, a unique creative atmosphere, its heritage and its links to Crystal Palace Park, will continue to attract many visitors.

Homes

11.107 Sustainable growth of the suburbs with some opportunity for windfall sites, and limited infilling, with dispersed integration of new homes will respect existing residential character and local distinctiveness.

Employment, Skills and Community Facilities

11.108 Alongside the District Centre's retail offer and evening economy, the potential for small scale employment will be realised. The established art scene will be strengthened by a dedicated Enterprise Centre. Cross borough working will ensure links to Crystal Palace Park are made, development is planned across the borough boundaries and potential employment opportunities, including tourism and related visitor accommodation, are captured. Other community facilities will be encouraged to locate in close proximity to the District Centre.

Character, Heritage and Design

11.109 Heritage assets and landmarks will be protected, ensuring that new development respects the local character and distinctiveness by referring to the Borough Character Appraisal to inform design quality. Opportunities for public realm improvements will primarily focus on the District Centre with any buildings and conversions of a high standard of design to ensure the character of the Centre and Conservation Areas are respected. The Local Historic Parks and Gardens in the area will be retained and new links provided where possible to incorporate them into the Green Grid network.

Green Grid and Open Space

11.110 Opportunities for new planting will be sought to enhance the character of the wooded hillside. Introduction of a new east/west link will be supported with improvements to the links between green spaces and way finding connecting to the existing Capital Ring. Working with neighbouring boroughs, connectivity to Crystal Palace Park will be improved where possible.

Transport

11.111 Improvements will be sought to create an environment more pleasant to walk and cycle through, with better connections and permeability for cyclists and pedestrians alike. The community will enjoy better quality, more frequent and more reliable bus services connecting with Croydon Metropolitan Centre. The tram system in Croydon will be further supported by promoting a new branch link to Crystal Palace. Travel plans will look to ease congestion at peak times by encouraging walking, cycling or public transport especially for school journeys.

Figure 11.7 Crystal Palace and Upper Norwood

Figure 11.7 Crystal Palace and Upper Norwood

 

General character

11.112 Crystal Palace and Upper Norwood are historic Victorian settlements, picturesquely located on green hills. It has a number of significant landmarks such as the Croydon television mast visible from long distances and various locations across London.

11.113 Crystal Palace and Upper Norwood is primarily residential Place where houses are interlaced with large parks such as The Lawns, Beaulieu Heights, Stambourne Woodland and Upper Norwood Recreation Grounds which were laid out in Victorian and Edwardian times. The original local character contained 'Large Houses On Relatively Small Plots'. Much of the historical architecture has been transformed into contemporary residential characters types such as 'Planned Estates Of Semi Detached Houses' and 'Medium Rise Blocks With Associated Grounds' and 'Compact Houses On Relatively Small Plots'. There are areas where high quality examples of the original character have survived. These have been designated as Conservations Areas.

11.114 The Upper Norwood Triangle Conservation Area predominantly contains the historic character of 'Urban Shopping Areas'. It is focused around the historic district centre where several London boroughs meet. The Upper Norwood Triangle Conservation Area adjoins the Crystal Palace Park Conservation Area in Bromley and the Westow Hill Conservation Area in Lambeth and contains a wide variety of historic buildings.

11.115 The Church Road Conservation Area predominantly encompasses the character of 'Large Houses On Relatively Small Plots' mixed with the historic green open areas of Westow Park, Stambourne Woodland and Beaulieu Heights. It is focused on one of Upper Norwood's grandest and most historic streets in a stunning landscape setting, the area also encompasses Beaulieu Heights, Sylvan Hill and Grange Hill as well as several Listed and Locally Listed Buildings.

11.116 The Harold Road Conservation Area predominantly encompasses the character of 'Large Houses On Relatively Small Plots'. It is an area centred on one of Upper Norwood's grandest residential streets with associated Upper Norwood Recreation Ground, and formed of large Victorian villas which were built for residents drawn to the area in the late 19th century by the relocated Crystal Palace.

11.117 The Beulah Hill Conservation Area encompasses the mix of 'Large Houses On Relatively Small Plots' and 'Detached Houses On Relatively Large Plots'. It is a significant grouping of Georgian and Victorian Villas within the historic affluent Beulah Spa area, partly located in the woodland setting, including a number of Listed and Locally Listed Buildings.

11.118 The Auckland Road and Howden Road Local Heritage Area consists of 'Large Houses On Relatively Small Plots'. It contains early vernacular houses with well-preserved original features dating from the 1880's. These include some bespoke Gothic inspired detailing.

Policy DM39: Crystal Palace and Upper Norwood

Within Crystal Palace and Upper Norwood allocate sites for development as set out in Table 11.7.

 

How the policy works

11.119 Crystal Palace and Upper Norwood has a predominately consistent character which can be managed by other policies. Additionally, the high concentration of heritage assets within this Place will enable its character to be managed through Conservation Area Appraisals and Management Plans and Croydon's Conservation Area General Guidance.

Allocating land for development.

11.120 Table 11.7 below sets out the proposed use on specific sites in Crystal Palace and Upper Norwood. The location and boundary of each detailed proposal can be found on the Policies Map and further details including indicative phasing and indicative number of homes (if applicable) can be found in Appendix 7.

Table 11.7 Proposals for uses of land of specific sites in Crystal Palace and Upper Norwood

Ref no

Site name

Proposed use

28

Bowyers Yard, Bedwardine Road

Cultural and Creative Industries Enterprise Centre

80

Victory Place

Ground floor retail, restaurant and studio space with hotel, office/or and residential uses on other floors

357

Norwood Heights Shopping Centre, Westow Street

Retail, replacement community use and residential

 

Kenley and Old Coulsdon

Vision, opportunities, constraints and change up to 2036

Vision

11.121 Kenley and Old Coulsdon, linked by Kenley Common will continue to be wooded hillside residential settlements retaining their suburban character. Connectivity between Kenley Aerodrome, Kenley railway station, Bradmore Green and the numerous green spaces will be improved where possible by enhanced Green Grid links for walking and cycling.

Homes

11.122 An area of sustainable growth of the suburbs, with some opportunity for windfall sites will see growth mainly by infilling with dispersed integration of new homes respecting existing residential character and local distinctiveness.

Employment, Skills and Community Facilities

11.123 The shopping parades in the area provide some jobs with Coulsdon Manor Hotel providing further employment opportunities. The Old Coulsdon and Kenley (Godstone Road) Neighbourhood Centres will be supporting the existing and future community with services and facilities beyond a retail function.

Character, Heritage and Design

11.124 New development will respect the local character and distinctiveness, referring to the Borough Character Appraisal to inform design quality. Opportunities for public realm improvements will focus on the Conservation Area of Bradmore Green. Any buildings and conversions should be of a high standard of design to ensure the characters of the Conservation Areas are respected.

Environment and Climate Change

11.125 Where possible the Caterham Bourne should be de-culverted to create a more natural environment whilst encouraging biodiversity. Development in the flood zone will be guided by the policies of the Plan to reduce flood risk.

Green Grid and Open Space

11.126 Links to existing green spaces and the extensive Green Grid network of paths from the residential areas will be improved and added to where possible, to provide more opportunities for cycling and walking. The Local Historic Parks and Gardens in the area will be retained and new links provided where feasible to incorporate them into the Green Grid network.

Transport

11.127 With its topography of steep hillsides the existing transport arteries are likely to remain, with local bus services, connections and levels of access maintained. Access will be improved where possible to an expanded Green Grid network with improved walking and cycling links to Kenley railway station and linkage to Whyteleafe railway station in the adjoining Tandridge District. The community will enjoy better quality, more frequent and reliable bus services connecting to Croydon Metropolitan Centre. Travel plans will look to ease congestion at peak times by encouraging walking, cycling or public transport especially for school journeys.

Figure 11.8 Kenley and Old Coulsdon

Figure 11.8 Kenley and Old Coulsdon

General character

11.128 Kenley and Old Coulsdon is a suburban area with green wooded hillsides (Dollypers Hill, Roydons Wood) and green open spaces (Kenley Common, Riddlesdown, Kenley Aerodrome) located within and around it. There is a strong link between the green infrastructure and the built environment. This creates a feeling of spaciousness or openness can be seen in the layout of the built environment.

11.129 The built areas of Kenley and Old Coulsdon predominantly consist of the following residential character types: 'Detached Houses On Relatively Large Plots' and 'Planned Estates Of Semi-Detached Houses'. The residential character is reinforced by consistent building lines and setbacks that create large green front gardens or (in the case of flatted development) grounds and rear gardens with tree planting.

11.130 Kenley and Old Coulsdon's shopping and community facilities are concentrated in the area between the Godstone Road and Kenley station. The area is framed by green space of Riddlesdown to the north and railway to the south.

11.131 Kenley's public realm, with features such as grass verges with tree planting, reflects the close coexistence of nature and built environment. Narrow lanes with extensive tree canopy cover and streets often with one footway and green areas of planting on the opposite side are all characteristic features of the public realm.

11.132 In areas where there are no grass verges, mature trees located within front gardens of residential developments provide extensive tree canopy cover, contributing to the impression of tree lined streets.

11.133 The Bradmore Green Conservation Area is the heart of the historic Old Coulsdon. It preserves the historic village character made by the green spaces of Bradmore Green and Grange Park mixed with 'Suburban Shopping Area', 'Detached Houses On Relatively Large Plots' and 'Planned Estates Of Semi-Detached Houses'. The area contains a number of historic Listed and Locally Listed Buildings such as the 18th century farmhouse and the 13th century Grade I Listed church of St John.

11.134 The Kenley Aerodrome Conservation Area is one of the most complete fighter airfield associated with the Battle of Britain to have survived, making it a battlefield site of particular national historic significance. The Conservation Area includes a number of scheduled monuments.

Policy DM40: Kenley and Old Coulsdon

Within Kenley and Old Coulsdon allocate sites for development as set out in Table 11.8.

 

How the policy works

11.135 Kenley and Old Coulsdon has a predominantly consistent character with capacity for growth managed by other policies.

Allocating land for development

11.136 Table 11.8 below sets out the proposed use on specific sites in Kenley and Old Coulsdon. The location and boundary of each detailed proposal can be found on the Policies Map and further details including indicative phasing and indicative number of homes (if applicable) can be found in Appendix 7.

Table 11.8 Proposals for uses of land of specific sites in Kenley and Old Coulsdon

Ref no

Site name

Proposed use

937

Kempsfield House, 1 Reedham Park Avenue

Residential development with community use

 

Norbury

Vision, opportunities, constraints and change up to 2036

Vision

11.137 Norbury, the northern gateway to Croydon, will continue to be characterised by its numerous open spaces. The District Centre will be home to a wide variety of businesses, reflecting the diversity of the local population. With a mixture of homes, community and cultural facilities and a range of retailing including many independent shops, it will have improved links to the railway station and Norbury Park. The Green Lane/Upper Northwood Road Neighbourhood Centre will be supporting the existing and future community with services and facilities beyond a retail function. Improvements to green links from and to the District Centre will enhance its unique suburban and urban qualities.

Homes

11.138 Sustainable growth of the suburbs with some opportunity for windfall sites and infilling, together with dispersed integration of new homes will respect existing residential character and local distinctiveness.

Employment, Skills and Community Facilities

11.139 The District Centre will continue to reflect the local, diverse community and provide local employment and services with community facilities encouraged to locate in close proximity.

Character, Heritage and Design

11.140 New development will respect the local character and distinctiveness of Norbury with its open spaces and historic park and heritage assets referring to the Borough Character Appraisal to inform design quality. The Registered Historic and Local Historic Parks and Gardens in the area will be retained and new links provided where possible to incorporate them into the Green Grid network. Opportunities for public realm improvements will focus on the District and Local Centres with any building and conversions of a high standard of design to ensure the character of the Centre and the Conservation Areas are respected.

Environment and Climate Change

11.141 Where possible, the Norbury Brook should be de-culverted to create a more natural environment, encourage biodiversity and increase access to nature. Development in the flood zones will be guided by the policies of the Plan to reduce flood risk.

Green Grid and Open Space

11.142 Emphasis will be placed on improving quality and access to local open spaces. New and existing Green Grid links to Biggin Wood (a remnant of the Great North Wood), Norbury Park and other open space in Norbury, will be focussed on, with way finding to encourage use.

Transport

11.143 Linkages with the District Centre and railway station will be improved where possible through an expanded Green Grid network, encouraging more sustainable travel. Cycling to Norbury railway station will be more attractive as cycle facilities are enhanced. The tram system in Croydon will be further supported by promoting a new line to Streatham, Brixton and Tooting through Norbury. The quality, frequency and reliability of bus services connecting to Croydon Metropolitan Centre, will be improved as the attraction of the Metropolitan Centre increases. Travel plans will look to ease congestion at peak times in the District Centre by encouraging walking, cycling or public transport especially for school journeys.

Figure 11.9 Norbury

Figure 11.9 Norbury

General character

11.144 Norbury is a suburban town with its District and Local Centres located along the long linear route of London Road. The built form of 'Large Buildings With Continuous Frontage Line' and 'Medium Rise Blocks With Associated Grounds' emphasises this linear route and its dominance on the area.

11.145 Norbury has a residential character that predominantly consists of 'Terraced Houses And Cottages', 'Large Houses On Relatively Small Plots' and 'Local Authority Housing with Public Realm', enriched by green spaces of Norbury Park through which Norbury Brook flows, Biggin Wood, Norbury Hall Park and Pollards Hill Park.

11.146 The Norwood Grove Conservation Area is focused around the historic Grade II registered landscape of Norwood Grove predominantly surrounded by 'Detached Houses On Relatively Large Plots'. It contains a number of well preserved and distinctive Listed and Locally Listed Georgian and Edwardian houses. The Conservation Area adjoins the Streatham Common Conservation Area in Lambeth.

11.147 The Norbury Estate Conservation Area represents the unified and consistent residential character type of 'Local Authority Built Housing With Public Realm'. This dense development from 1914-1921 represents a unique example of Arts and Crafts terraces and is the first outer London cottage estate built by the London County Council.

11.148 The London Road Norbury Local Heritage Area is an example of an 'Urban Shopping Area' character type. The shopping parades represent a high quality cross-section of architectural styles from the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries, with the unified form of shopfronts at ground floor level and rhythms of red brick facades with decorative brick and sandstone features above.

11.149 The Beatrice Avenue Local Heritage Area predominantly consists of 'Terraced Houses And Cottages'. It has a good range of well-preserved late Victorian suburban houses laid out between 1900 and 1936, with many original and bespoke Arts and Crafts inspired features. The prominent St Phillip's Church terminates views from the tree-lined residential street.

11.150 The Pollards Hill South Local Heritage Area consists of terraced houses which complement the predominant character of the area of 'Planned Estates Of Semi-Detached Houses' in a particularly creative way. This distinctive grouping represents a unique example of individual Arts and Crafts terraces laid out to appear as large U-shaped buildings with a number of distinctive architectural features. The well preserved and distinctive 1930's townscape is an example of an innovative approach to defining street frontages through sequence of courtyards.

Policy DM41: Norbury

DM41.1 Within Norbury District Centre, to facilitate growth and to enhance the distinctive character, developments should:

  1. Complement the existing predominant building heights of 2 storeys up to a maximum of 5 storeys;
  2. Ensure proposal for large buildings are visually consistent with the predominant urban grain; and
  3. Seek opportunity to provide direct access from the south of London Road to Norbury railway station.

 

DM41.2 Within Pollards Hill Local Centre, to ensure that proposals positively enhance and strengthen the character developments should:

  1. Retain the edge and separation of Pollards Hill Local Centre from other adjoining character areas by limiting the urban grain within its boundaries;
  2. Complement the existing predominant building heights of 3 storeys up to a maximum of 4 storeys;
  3. Incorporate multi-stock brick as the predominant facing materials of the whole building; and d) Retain the extent and enhance the quality of the existing public realm within the development, including reinforcing a consistent building line.

 

DM41.3 Within Norbury allocate sites for development as set out in Table 11.9.

 

How the policy works

11.151 The areas in which Policies DM41.1 and DM41.2 apply are shown on the Policies Map.

11.152 The areas identified for Place-specific development management policies are Norbury District Centre and Pollards Hill Local Centre. These Place-specific development management policies are required to ensure the distinctions, edge and separation between the centres and adjoining areas are maintained.

11.153 These areas have potential for growth. There are precedents on London Road of large and tall buildings however these are mainly located outside designated centres. In order to retain the distinctiveness of each of Norbury's centres and to reinforce the prominence of the scale of built environment within these areas policies DM41.1 and DM41.2 identify the maximum buildings heights along with key architectural features to enable growth and retain local distinctiveness.

Allocating land for development

11.154 Table 11.9 below sets out the proposed use on specific sites in Norbury. The location and boundary of each detailed proposal can be found on the Policies Map and further details including indicative phasing and indicative number of homes (if applicable) can be found in Appendix 7.

Table 11.9 Proposals for uses of land of specific sites in Norbury

Ref no

Site name

Proposed use

284

Asharia House, 50 Northwood Road

Residential development including replacement community facility

951

1485-1489 London Road

Redevelopment for residential and retail

 

Purley

Vision, opportunities, constraints and change up to 2036

Vision

11.155 Purley will be a regenerated District Centre, retaining its historic local character with a mixture of homes, community and cultural facilities and a range of retailing including many independent shops. The Purley South/Brighton Road/Downlands Road Neighbourhood Centre will be supporting the existing and future community with services and facilities beyond a retail function. An enhanced public realm with improved accessibility and good links to open space and a new Enterprise Centre will all contribute to the regeneration of Purley.

Homes

11.156 As a broad location the main focus of major residential growth will be in and around the District Centre with high quality residential development that will respect the existing residential character and local distinctiveness.

Employment, Skills and Community Facilities

11.157 Realisation of the potential of Purley for creative industries through the development of a new Enterprise Centre will support the local economy. Independent shops and restaurants will be encouraged in the District Centre with community facilities in close proximity to rejuvenate the centre's daytime and evening economy.

Character, Heritage and Design

11.158 New development will respect the existing local character and distinctiveness of Purley, referring to the Borough Character Appraisal to inform design quality, with opportunities for public realm improvements primarily focussing on the District Centre whilst seeking to improve links to open space. Any buildings and conversions should be of a high standard of design to ensure the character of the Centre and the Conservation Area are respected. The Registered Historic and Local Historic Parks and Gardens in the area will be retained and new links provided where possible, to incorporate them into the Green Grid network.

Environment and Climate Change

11.159 Through enabling development, potential exists to implement flood mitigation and adaptation measures along the Brighton Road and south east towards Kenley. Purley District Centre and the surrounding area may be suitable for a district heat network.

Green Grid and Open Space

11.160 Opportunities to improve links to existing open spaces, along with way finding around Purley, and to and from the District Centre will be sought.

Transport

11.161 New bus route measures and improvements, will be developed where possible along the Brighton Road linking Croydon Metropolitan Centre with Purley District Centre. Cycle facilities will be expanded at Purley railway station. Measures to improve connectivity for pedestrians in Purley District Centre will be explored. Travel plans will look to ease congestion at peak times by encouraging walking, cycling or public transport especially for school journeys. Realisation of the potential for the Warren Road railhead to transfer freight to rail will be supported.

Figure 11.10 Purley

Figure 11.10 Purley

General character

11.162 Purley is a suburban market town located on wooded hillsides and in the valley. Its spatial structure is organised along the strong dominant corridor of the Brighton Road and Godstone Road where a wide variety of character types coexist. These are 'Urban Shopping Areas', 'Industrial Estates', 'Retail Estates & Business & Leisure Parks' and moderate density residential areas such as 'Terraced Houses And Cottages', 'Medium Rise Blocks With Associated Grounds', 'Compact Houses On Relatively Small Plots', and 'Planned Estates Of Semi-Detached Houses'. 'Large Buildings With Continuous Frontage Line' dominate in the District Centre and its vicinity.

11.163 The residential character outside of Brighton Road is fairly uniform and consists of large detached houses on relatively large plots with minimal public realm and low density scattered houses on relatively small plots.

11.164 The Webb Estate and Upper Woodcote Village Conservation Area with its consistent character of 'Scattered Houses On Large Plots' is a notable Edwardian garden suburb created by developer William Webb based upon his Garden First Principles. The model village, laid out around Woodcote Green, is the focus of the area. Both Conservation Areas are rich in historic buildings which are set amidst mature landscaping.

11.165 The Brighton Road (Purley) Local Heritage Area has an 'Urban Shopping Area' character. It contains collection of shopping parade buildings from the late 19th and 20th century, that demonstrate a variety of styles with well-preserved and distinctive architectural features.

Policy DM42: Purley

DM42.1 Within Purley District Centre and its environs, to ensure that proposals positively enhance and strengthen the character and facilitate growth, developments should:
  1. Reinforce the continuous building line which responds to the street layout and include ground floor active frontages;
  2. Complement the existing predominant building heights of 3 to 8 storeys, with a potential for a new landmark of up to a maximum of 16 storeys; and
  3. Demonstrate innovative and sustainable design, with special attention given to the detailing of frontages.

 

DM42.2 In the environs of Reedham station, to create the sense of place and facilitate growth proposals should:

  1. Complement the existing predominant building heights of 2 storeys up to a maximum of 4 storeys;
  2. Reinforce the predominant building lines and frontages which positively respond to the form of the Brighton Road/Old Lodge Lane junction;
  3. Improve pedestrian and cycle permeability, accessibility and connectivity across the railway between Brighton Road, Watney Close, Aveling Close and Fairbairn Close; and
  4. Enhance the suburban shopping area character of this section of Brighton Road.

 

DM42.3 In the area of the junction of Brighton Road and Purley Downs Road, to reduce the impact of Brighton Road as a linear route, clearly differentiate the area from Purley District Centre and Brighton Road (Sanderstead Road) Local Centre and strengthen the sense of place, proposals should:

  1. Retain and create open glimpses and vistas between buildings;
  2. Introduce building with landscapes that respond and reflect the layout of the 1930s blocks of Lansdowne Court and Purley Court; and
  3. Complement the existing predominant building heights of 2 storeys up to a maximum of 5 storeys.

 

DM42.4 Within Purley allocate sites for development as set out in Table 11.10.

 

How the policy works

11.166 The areas in which Policies DM42.1 to DM42.3 apply are shown on the Policies Map.

Purley District Centre and its environs

11.167 Purley District Centre is a well-defined urban town with a high concentration of commercial and community uses. The road network and a large scale roundabout divide the centre.

11.168 This area has a varied topography which presents opportunities for tall buildings and the availability of vacant land creates the potential for growth. Policy DM42.1 facilitates this and identifies architectural features that should be referenced in the design of the development to enhance the distinctive character of Purley District Centre.

The environs of Reedham station

11.169 The environs of Reedham station have good public transport accessibility and a varied character including 'Urban Shopping Area', 'Large Buildings with Continuous Frontage Line, 'Large Buildings With Spacing', 'Medium Rise Blocks With Associated Grounds' and 'Planned Estates Of Semi-Detached Houses'.

11.170 A Place-specific development management policy is required to facilitate growth, improve pedestrian and cycle permeability across the railway line and to create the sense of place.

The area of the junction of Brighton Road and Purley Downs Road

11.171 The Brighton Road/Purley Downs Road junction area forms the edge between South Croydon and Purley. Capella Court forms a visual marker which closes the vistas along the Purley and South Croydon sections of Brighton Road. The massing of Capella Court dominates the residential and industrial buildings within the surrounding area. This area's distinct qualities are informed by the landmark building surrounded by low rise structures set in greenery.

11.172 Detailed policies are required to strengthen the character of the Brighton Road and Purley Downs Road junction area.

Allocating land for development

11.173 Table 11.10 below sets out the proposed use on specific sites in Purley. The location and boundary of each detailed proposal can be found on the Policies Map and further details including indicative phasing and indicative number of homes (if applicable) can be found in Appendix 7.

Table 11.10 Proposals for uses of land of specific sites in Purley

Ref no

Site name

Proposed use

30

Purley Leisure Centre, car park and former Sainsbury's Supermarket, High Street

Mixed use redevelopment incorporating public car park, new leisure facilities, including a swimming pool, and other community facilities, healthcare facility, creative and cultural industries enterprise centre, retail or residential accomodation.

35

Purley Baptist Church, 2-12 Banstead Road

Mixed use redevelopment comprising new church, community facility and residential, with development located outside Flood Zone 2 and 3a.

61

Car park, 54-58 Whytecliffe Road South

Residential use with retention of car parking spaces

130

1-9 Banstead Road

Residential

324

Purley Oaks Depot, 505-600 Brighton Road

20 Gypsy and Traveller pitches

325

Telephone Exchange, 88-90 Brighton Road

Conversion of existing building to residential use if no longer required as a telephone exchange in the future

347

Tesco, 2 Purley Road

Mixed use residential, healthcare facility (if required by the NHS) and retail development

405

Capella Court & Royal Oak Centre, 725 Brighton Road

Residential development and health facility, and the retention and reconfiguration of existing uses and their floor space with no net loss of flood storage capacity

409

Beech House, 840 Brighton Road

Conversion of the office building to residential uses.

410

100 Brighton Road

Mixed use residential and retail development

411

Palmerston House, 814 Brighton Road

Residential redevelopment

490

95-111 Brighton Road

Primary school

495

Dairy Crest dairy, 823-825 Brighton Road

Conversion of buildings fronting Brighton Road to studio space (with potential for a Creative and Cultural Industries Enterprise Centre serving Purley) with new light industrial units to the rear

683

Purley Back Lanes, 16-28 Pampisford Road

Residential development and public car park including new industrial units to replace those currently on the site

 

Sanderstead

Vision, opportunities, constraints and change up to 2036

Vision

11.174 Sanderstead will continue to be a predominantly 1930s suburb, with a village character focussed on the pond and church, surrounded by substantial green space with improved cycle and pedestrian links, served by the Sanderstead and Hamsey Green Local Centres.

Homes

11.175 An area of sustainable growth of the suburbs with some opportunity for windfall sites, growth will mainly be of infilling with dispersed integration of new homes that respect existing residential character and local distinctiveness.

Employment, Skills and Community Facilities

11.176 Employment opportunities will be concentrated in the two Local Centres with predominantly independent shops supporting the local community.

Character, Heritage and Design

11.177 New development will respect local character and distinctiveness referring to the Borough Character Appraisal to inform design quality. Any opportunities for public realm improvements will focus on the two Local Centres of Sanderstead and Hamsey Green. Any buildings and conversions should be of a high standard of design to ensure the characters of the Centres are respected.

Green Grid and Open Space

11.178 As a key link in the east part of the Green Grid network of the borough, links to existing green spaces from the residential areas will be improved with further connections added where possible. The additional green links, with way finding, will enable more opportunities for walking and cycling within and through the area. The Local Historic Parks and Gardens will be retained and new links provided where feasible to incorporate them into the Green Grid network.

Transport

11.179 With its topography of steep hillsides, the existing transport arteries are likely to remain with local bus service connections and level of access maintained. Access will be improved where possible to an expanded Green Grid network with improved walking and cycling links to Sanderstead railway station. The community will enjoy better quality, more frequent and reliable bus services connecting with Croydon Metropolitan Centre. Travel plans will look to ease congestion at peak times in the Local Centre by encouraging walking, cycling or public transport especially for school journeys.

Figure 11.11 Sanderstead

Figure 11.11 Sanderstead

General character

11.180 Sanderstead is a suburban Place located on a hilltop, with residential areas of Purley Downs, Riddlesdown, Hamsey Green and Sanderstead surrounded by large scale green open spaces such as Mitchley Wood, Riddlesdown and Kings Wood.

11.181 The predominant residential character consists of detached 'Housing on Relatively Large Plots' on the hillsides leading to the Local Centre, 'Planned Estates Of Semi-Detached Houses' at the top of Sanderstead Hill, and some 'Local Authority Built Housing With Public Realm'' towards the Local Centre of Hamsey Green.

Policy DM43: Sanderstead

DM43.1 Within Sanderstead Local Centre, to respect and enhance the distinctive qualities proposals should:

  1. Reinforce the suburban shopping area character;
  2. Reference, respect and enhance architectural features such as the consistent rhythm of pairs of buildings with identical frontages and the articulation of openings;
  3. Retain features such as the projecting bay windows;
  4. Retain wide vistas and strengthen visual connections to green open spaces; and
  5. Improve walking and cycling connectivity and access to open space.

 

DM43.2 Within Hamsey Green Local Centre, to respect and enhance the distinctive 'Suburban Shopping Area' character of Hamsey Green, proposals should:

  1. Reinforce the suburban shopping area character;
  2. Positively reference, respect and enhance architectural features such as the consistent rhythm and articulation of window and doors;
  3. Ensure the extent of the public realm within the vicinity of the development is retained and improved; and
  4. Incorporate multi-stock brick or white render as the predominant facing material.

 

DM43.3 Within Sanderstead allocate sites for development as set out in Table 11.11.

 

How the policy works

11.182 The areas in which Policies DM43.1 and DM43.2 apply are shown on the Policies Map.

Sanderstead Local Centre

11.183 Sanderstead Local Centre has visual and physical links onto neighbouring green areas to the west. It has a consistent building line to the east. The character of the low rise 'Urban Shopping Area' is enriched by 'Institutions With Associated Grounds', 'Retail Estates' and 'Terraced Houses And Cottages'.

11.184 The 'Urban Shopping Area' contains distinctive architectural features such a consistent rhythm created by pairs of multi-stock brick buildings with matching facades containing windows and doors identically articulated. Within this area detailed policies are required to strengthen the identity of the Local Centre.

Hamsey Green Local Centre

11.185 Hamsey Green is defined by its 'Suburban Shopping Area' character with Green verges and tree planting. Sections of the Local Centre have a consistent character. This can be seen through elements such as rhythm and articulation of window and doors. In areas where the character is inconsistent the Place-specific development management policy in DM43.2 will help enhance Hamsey Green's local identity and encourage growth.

Allocating land for development

11.186 Table 11.11 below sets out the proposed use on specific sites in Sanderstead. The location and boundary of each detailed proposal can be found on the Policies Map and further details including indicative phasing and indicative number of homes (if applicable) can be found in Appendix 7.

Table 11.11 Proposals for uses of land of specific sites in Sanderstead

Ref no

Site name

Proposed use

306

The Good Companions Public House site, 251 Tithe Pit Shaw Lane

Mixed use of residential and retail

947

359-367 Limpsfield Road

Residential with 1 - 3 commercial units on ground floor.

 

Selsdon

Vision, opportunities, constraints and change up to 2036

Vision

11.187 Selsdon District Centre will continue to provide a range of services for the residential population in a suburban setting with good links to its green open spaces and countryside. Selsdon Park Road/Featherbed Lane Neighbourhood Centre will be supporting the existing and future community with services and facilities beyond a retail function.

Homes

11.188 An area of sustainable growth of the suburbs with some opportunity for windfall sites will see growth mainly confined to infilling with dispersed integration of new homes respecting existing residential character and local distinctiveness.

Employment, Skills and Community Facilities

11.189 Selsdon District Centre will continue to be the main focus for employment, with the adjacent Selsdon Park Hotel also providing local job opportunities. Community facilities will be focused on the District Centre.

Character, Heritage and Design

11.190 New development will respect the existing local character and distinctiveness referring to the Borough Character Appraisal to inform design quality. Any public realm improvements should primarily focus on the District Centre. Any building and conversions should be of a high standard of design to ensure the character of the Centre is respected.

Green Grid and Open Space

11.191 Links to existing green spaces from the residential areas will be improved where possible with additional connections to strategic green links enabling more opportunities for walking and cycling in the area.

Transport

11.192 With a tram stop to the north edge of Selsdon, local bus services, connections and access will be maintained, but with improved walking and cycling routes where possible via improvements to the Green Grid. The community will enjoy better quality, more frequent and reliable bus services connecting with Croydon Metropolitan Centre. Travel plans will look to ease congestion at peak times in the District Centres by encouraging walking, cycling or public transport especially for school journeys.

Figure 11.12 Selsdon

Figure 11.12 Selsdon

General character

11.193 Selsdon is a suburban residential Place with a well-defined District Centre, surrounded by large scale green open spaces such as Selsdon Wood, Heathfield and Littleheath Woods. The predominant residential character types consist of 'Planned Estates Of Semi-Detached Houses', some 'Local Authority Built Housing with Public Realm', 'Compact Houses On Relatively Small Plots' and 'Medium Rise Blocks With Associated Grounds'.

Policy DM44: Selsdon

DM44.1 Within Selsdon District Centre, to enhance the character of Selsdon District Centre proposals should:

  1. Complement the existing predominant building heights of 3 storeys up to a maximum of 4 storeys;
  2. Ensure large buildings are sensitively located and of a massing no larger than buildings within this area;
  3. Ensure that the front elevation of large buildings are broken down to respect the architectural rhythm of the existing street frontages; and
  4. Should incorporate red multi-stock brick as the predominant facing material.

 

DM44.2 Within Selsdon allocate sites for development as set out in Table 11.12.

 

How the policy works

11.194 The area in which Policy DM44.1 applies is shown on the Policies Map.

Selsdon District Centre

11.195 Selsdon District Centre has a strong 'Urban Shopping Area' character. Both ends of which are marked by retail outlets, creating a well-defined edge and a distinct start and finish to this character area.

11.196 There are two intermingled and competing architectural styles of buildings. The mock Tudor facades pays reference to the residential surroundings, however these are of a low quality and have aged visibly. The second, modernist style buildings have red multi-stock brick facades. These are of a slightly higher quality and better express the distinctiveness of the District Centre and are therefore, more appropriate for this location. Detailed policy is required to strengthen the sense of place.

11.197 In the western part of the centre the public realm is fragmented and dominated by the overwhelming scale of the Addington Road and Old Farleigh Road junction. There is an opportunity to improve the walking and cycling experience in this area.

Allocating land for development

11.198 Table 11.12 below sets out the proposed use on specific sites in Selsdon. The location and boundary of each detailed proposal can be found on the Policies Map and further details including indicative phasing and indicative number of homes (if applicable) can be found in Appendix 7.

Table 11.12 Proposals for uses of land of specific sites in Selsdon

Ref no

Site name

Proposed use

948

230 Addington Road

Residential with retail on ground floor (up to 3 units).

 

Shirley

Vision, opportunities, constraints and change up to 2036

Vision

11.199 Shirley will continue to be a suburb surrounded by substantial green space with improved cycle and pedestrian links. The vibrant Local Centre, with a range of retailing and independent shops will continue to serve the local community. A mature and rejuvenated Shrublands will be served by both local shops as well as those on Wickham Road. Shirley Road and Spring Park/Bridle Road Neighbourhood Centres will be supporting the existing and future community with services and facilities beyond a retail function.

Homes

11.200 An area of sustainable growth of the suburbs with some opportunity for windfall sites will see growth mainly confined to infilling with dispersed integration of new homes respecting existing residential character and local distinctiveness.

Employment, Skills and Community Facilities

11.201 Some small scale employment will be provided in the Local Centre with predominantly independent shops supporting the local community.

Character, Heritage and Design

11.202 New development will be sensitive to the existing residential character and the wooded hillsides of the Place referring to the Borough Character Appraisal to inform design quality. Public realm improvements will focus on the Local Centre. Any building and conversions should be of a high standard of design to ensure the character of the Centre is respected.

Environment and Climate Change

11.203 Development in the flood zones will be guided by the policies of the Plan to reduce flood risk.

Green Grid and Open Space

11.204 Shirley will continue to be well served by open space with improved connections to the Green Grid, along with way finding, enabling increased walking and cycling. The Registered Historic and Local Historic Parks and Gardens in the area will be retained and new links provided where possible to incorporate them into the Green Grid network.

Transport

11.205 With improved access and links where possible, the existing connectivity and good public transport of Shirley will be maintained. The community will enjoy better quality, more frequent and reliable bus services connecting with Croydon Metropolitan Centre. Travel plans will look to ease congestion at peak times in the Local Centres by encouraging walking, cycling or public transport especially for school journeys.

Figure 11.13 Shirley

Figure 11.13 Shirley

General character

11.206 Shirley is predominantly a suburban residential settlement surrounded by natural areas of Green Belt. This place is defined by the tree lined streets, the regular rhythm of well-spaced buildings with well-kept landscaped areas to the front, that allow oblique long range views beyond the rear gardens.

11.207 Shirley's residential character predominantly consists of 'Planned Estates Of Semi-Detached Houses' with garages and 'Compact Houses On Relatively Small Plots' set in large green spaces. This combination creates an open varied and interesting skyline and roofscape. The southern part is dominated by 'Scattered Houses On Large Plots' surrounded by expansive areas of greenery, including woodland of Addington Hills.

11.208 Shirley has three urban and one suburban shopping area characters along Wickham and Shirley Roads. The suburban feel of these shopping areas are strengthened by tree lined streets, green verges with planting and small green spaces and parking accommodated in slip roads. These features play a vital role in creating Shirley's sense of place.

11.209 The Upper Shirley Road Local Heritage Area predominantly consists of the 'Terraced Houses And Cottages' character type. Buildings represent a range of styles and architectural forms dating from the 18th century, with well-preserved original features. The grouping, its design and layout are a record of the local history of building design and development in this area.

11.210 The Stuart Crescent Local Heritage Area lies in the heart of the Spring Farm area which has a consistent character of 'Planned Estates Of Semi-Detached Houses'. The layout is arranged around the remnants of a circular historic copse. The mature landscaping reveals the historic character of the landscape which pre-dates development.

11.211 The Bishops Walk Local Heritage Area represents a distinctive high quality historic landscape and townscape with a 'Scattered Houses On Large Plots' residential character. The southern section of Bishops Walk's mature landscaping reveals the historic design of Addington Park which pre-dated and allows for scenic views within and outside of the area. The distinctive design of the northern section creates a well-integrated topography, planting and built environment.

Policy DM45: Shirley

DM45.1 Within Shirley Local Centre, to retain the unique qualities development should:

  1. Retain the continuity of ground floor active frontages and allow flexibility at first floor and above for mixed use;
  2. Reference, respect and enhance architectural features such as the consistent rhythm and articulation of fenestration and retain features such as the triangular bay windows;
  3. Complement the existing predominant building heights of 2 storeys up to a maximum of 4 storeys; and
  4. Incorporate or retain traditional shop front elements such as fascias, pilasters and stall risers.

 

DM45.2 In the area between 518 and 568 Wickham Road, to improve the character proposals should reference the 'Suburban Shopping Area' character type.

DM45.3 In the area of the Wickham Road Shopping Parade, to retain the distinctive character of the 794-850 Wickham Road proposals should:

  1. Complement the existing predominant building heights up to a maximum of 2 storeys; and
  2. Retain the 'Suburban Shopping Area' character.

 

DM45.4 Within Shirley allocate sites for development as set out in Table 11.13.

 

How the policy works

11.212 The areas in which Policies DM45.1 to DM45.3 apply are shown on the Policies Map.

Shirley Local Centre

11.213 Shirley Local Centre consists of the combination of three different character types an 'Urban Shopping Area', 'Scattered Houses On Large Plots' and a 'Suburban Shopping Area'. The northern side of the Local Centre is more tightly built-up, while the southern more is spacious with green verges, tree lined streets and parking within slip roads. In this area the potential for growth is limited.

Wickham Road

11.214 Each of Shirley's shopping areas has a distinct character which should be enhanced and strengthened. This character is informed by the layout, scale, urban grain and, architectural features such as the brick work, fascias and stall rises. In order to ensure that the distinctive elements that contribute to Shirley's sense of place are not lost, these features have been included in the detailed policies.

Allocating land for development

11.215 Table 11.13 below sets out the proposed use on specific sites in Shirley. The location and boundary of each detailed proposal can be found on the Policies Map and further details including indicative phasing and indicative number of homes (if applicable) can be found in Appendix 7.

Table 11.13 Proposals for uses of land of specific sites in Shirley

Ref no

Site name

Proposed use

128

Land at Poppy Lane

Residential development

502

Coombe Farm, Oaks Road

Residential development so long as the development has no greater footprint, volume or impact on openness on the Metropolitan Green Belt than the existing buildings on the site

504

Stroud Green Pumping Station, 140 Primrose Lane

Residential development (including the conversion of the Locally Listed pumping station) if the site is no longer required for its current use in the future. It should be noted that ordinary watercourses have not have been included in the fluvial modelling of the River Wandle and therefore a fluvial flood risk from this watercourse may be present.

 

South Croydon

Vision, opportunities, constraints and change up to 2036

Vision

11.216 South Croydon will continue to be a highly accessible Place with good connections to open space providing an introduction to the suburban south. The character of the area will be improved through support for the wide range of independent shops and restaurants along South End and its two Local Centres. South End/Parker Road/St Peter's Church Neighbourhood Centre will be supporting the existing and future community with services and facilities beyond a retail function.

Homes

11.217 The main focus for sustainable growth of the suburbs will be in the Brighton Road area with a mix of windfall and infill development that respects the existing residential character and local distinctiveness and includes flood mitigation measures.

Employment, Skills and Community Facilities

11.218 Selsdon Road (including Carlton Road), will remain an important Separated Industrial Location for the borough and will continue to be protected. Elsewhere employment will be concentrated in the two Local Centres and along the Brighton Road.

Character, Heritage and Desig

11.219 New development will be sensitive to the existing local character and the wooded hillsides of the Place referring to the Borough Character Appraisal to inform design quality. Opportunities for public realm improvements will be primarily focused on the two Local Centres with any building and conversions of a high standard of design to ensure the character of the Centres and Conservation Areas are respected. The Local Historic Parks and Gardens in the area will be retained and new links provided where possible to incorporate them into the Green Grid network.

Environment and Climate Change

11.220 Through enabling development, potential exists to implement flood mitigation and adaptation measures along the Brighton Road.

Green Grid and Open Space

11.221 Improved connections to the Green Grid will be sought to increase opportunities for walking and cycling in the area.

Transport

11.222 The existing connectivity and good public transport of South Croydon will be maintained and enhanced where possible, with the quality, capacity and reliability of bus services improved. Travel plans will look to ease congestion at peak times by encouraging walking, cycling or public transport especially for school journeys. The potential of Selsdon Road Industrial Location to act as a railhead to transfer freight to rail will be supported.

Figure 11.14 South Croydon

Figure 11.14 South Croydon

General character

11.223 South Croydon is organised in a south to north alignment along the Brighton Road. Its fragmented character can be attributed to the Brighton Road and railway infrastructure. The areas to the east are rich in green open spaces including areas of Green Belt such as Lloyd Park. The 'Industrial Estates' are primarily concentrated along the railway. Small pockets of 'Industrial Estates' are also scattered amongst residential blocks.

11.224 The predominant residential character consists of 'Terraced Houses And Cottages', located within the central strip, with the mix of 'Medium Rise Blocks With Associated Grounds and 'Compact Houses On Relatively Small Plots' to the west and north. The areas to the east contain 'Detached Houses On Relatively Large Plots' and 'Large Houses On Relatively Small Plots', a number of which have been Locally Listed.

11.225 The Croham Manor Road Conservation Area represents the 'Detached Houses On Relatively Large Plots' character type. It is a notable collection of early 20th century Locally Listed houses with a wealth of well-preserved arts and crafts features.

11.226 The South End Local Heritage Area has an 'Urban Shopping Area' character. It represents an early vernacular architectural style from late 19th with a wide range of well-preserved highly decorative architectural features. Its historic townscape composition consists of the street frontage and a triangular square with the prominent former Swan and Sugarloaf building terminating vistas along Brighton Road.

11.227 The 'Urban Shopping Areas' of Ye Market Local Heritage Area is a distinctive early 20th century 'mock Tudor' style shopping parade with a range of preserved original decorative features and detailing.

11.228 St Peter's Road Local Heritage Area is focused around the Grade II Listed St Peter's Church with its high quality historic landscape that enables long vistas over South Croydon and reveals a panorama of the Croydon Opportunity Area and glimpses across the area. The character consists of the 'Institutions With Associated Grounds' surrounded by 'Large Houses On Relatively Small Plots' of well-preserved Victorian villas set in the high quality townscape.

11.229 The Birdhurst Road Local Heritage Area predominantly contains the 'Large Houses On Relatively Small Plots' residential character type. It represents a collective value of high quality, well-designed and well-preserved Victorian Villas dating from before 1890. There is a distinctive relationship between the mature landscape of the street scene, the design of the buildings and the plan layout.

Policy DM46: South Croydon

DM46.1 Within the Brighton Road (Selsdon Road) Local Centre, to encourage a balance to be struck between strengthening and enhancing the character and facilitating growth, proposals should:

  1. Complement the existing predominant building heights up to a maximum of 3 storeys;
  2. Positively reinforce, strengthen and enhance characteristic features such as the articulation of corner buildings and continuous building line;
  3. Incorporate main entrances onto Brighton Road; and
  4. Positively reference, respect and enhance the articulation of shop fronts, including consistent rhythm and size of windows and doors.

 

DM46.2 Within South Croydon allocate sites for development as set out in Table 11.14.

 

How the policy works

11.230 The area in which Policy DM46.1 applies is shown on the Policies Map.

Brighton Road (Selsdon Road) Local Centre

11.231 The two Local Centres along Brighton Road are dominated by the road infrastructure. The predominant character of 'Urban Shopping Areas' is characterised by the consistency of architecture and landmark buildings that serve as focal points and close the vistas at the apexes of Brighton Road and South End.

11.232 The street frontages in the area are active and continuous. Ground floors are strongly articulated, have a consistent rhythm and size of ground floor doors and windows. The predominantly hard surfaced public realm has narrow footways that do not encourage walking.

11.233 Place-specific development management policies are required to ensure a balance is struck between strengthening and enhancing the character of the Local Centres and facilitating growth.

Allocating land for development

11.234 Table 11.14 below sets out the proposed use on specific sites in South Croydon. The location and boundary of each detailed proposal can be found on the Policies Map and further details including indicative phasing and indicative number of homes (if applicable) can be found in Appendix 7.

Table 11.14 Proposals for uses of land of specific sites in South Croydon

Ref no

Site name

Proposed use

54

BMW House, 375-401 Brighton Road

Mixed use residential and supermarket. The site is located within Flood Zone 3a associated with the culverted River Wandle. At this location, the culverted River Wandle has been incorporated into the surface water sewer system as it flows north below the A235 Brighton Road. A Flood Warning and Evacuation Management Plan must be prepared for the site.

345

Normanton Park Hotel, 34-36 Normanton Road

Residential development with primary school expansion if required (otherwise the whole site may be used for residential development).

662

Coombe Road Playing Fields, Coombe Road

Secondary school with retention of playing pitches

 

South Norwood and Woodside

Vision, opportunities, constraints and change up to 2036

Vision

11.235 South Norwood and Woodside will be a revitalised residential neighbourhood, benefiting from London Overground services to Docklands, the City, and a good connection to Croydon Metropolitan Centre. A revived, enhanced District Centre will offer a mixture of homes, community and cultural facilities and a range of retailing, including many independent shops. South Norwood and Woodside, with their good transport connections will grow in popularity as a residential area and share in the borough's improving prosperity. Woodside Green and Portland Road (Watcombe Road/Woodside Avenue) Neighbourhood Centres will be supporting the existing and future community with services and facilities beyond a retail function.

Homes, Employment, Skills and Community Facilities

11.236 Sustainable growth of the suburbs with predominantly windfall sites and dispersed integration of new homes will respect existing residential character and local distinctiveness. Selhurst Park is currently the home of Crystal Palace Football Club. The District Centre, Portland Road and Woodside Green will continue to provide employment and services for the local community. Other community facilities will be encouraged to locate in close proximity to the District Centre and opportunities to provide an Enterprise Centre, which could be creative industry based, will be sought in the vicinity of Portland Road.

Character, Heritage and Design

11.237 Heritage assets and landmarks will be protected, ensuring that new development respects the local character and distinctiveness of South Norwood and Woodside referring to the Borough Character Appraisal to inform design quality. Opportunities for public realm improvements will be primarily focussed on the South Norwood District Centre and Norwood Junction with any building and conversions of a high standard of design to ensure the character of the Centre and the Conservation Area are respected.

Environment, Climate Change, Green Grid and Open Space

11.238 The Place's diverse open spaces include South Norwood Lake and Country Park. Links will be provided, where possible to the Croydon Metropolitan Centre and Waterlink Way as part of the National Cycle Network. New Green Grid links will improve connectivity with the Local Historic Parks and Gardens and other green spaces to incorporate them into the Green Grid network. Development in the flood zones will be guided by the policies of the Plan to reduce flood risk.

Transport

11.239 Cycle facilities will be enhanced at Norwood Junction railway station benefiting the local population who live within walking and cycling distance of this important station. The tram system in Croydon will be further supported by promoting new branch links to Crystal Palace and Bromley through South Norwood and Woodside. Measures to provide better quality, more frequent and reliable bus services along Whitehorse Road, Whitehorse Lane and Selhurst Road (A213) will be promoted. Travel plans will look to ease congestion at peak times by encouraging walking, cycling or public transport especially for school journeys.

Figure 11.15 South Norwood and Woodside

Figure 11.15 South Norwood and Woodside

General character

11.240 South Norwood has retained its Victorian urban centre, which has been recognised in its Conservation Area designation. It is predominantly a residential Place with a character of 'Terraced Houses And Cottages' with some patches of 'Medium Rise Blocks With Associated Grounds and 'Compact Houses On Relatively Small Plots'. Some larger buildings including residential 'Tower Buildings' and 'Large Buildings With Spacing' are scattered in the District Centre, in the vicinity of the railway line. Larger 'Industrial Estates' are located along the railways and scattered within smaller residential blocks. The Place's only 'Retail Estate & Business & Leisure Park' lies on the western edge next to Selhurst Park football stadium.

11.241 Portland Road, one of the two historic high streets in South Norwood, links the District Centre with Woodside Green. It has a predominant 'Urban Shopping Area' character interlaced with residential developments, predominantly 'Medium Rise Blocks With Associated Grounds' and 'Large Buildings With Continuous Frontage Line'.

11.242 Woodside Green contains some of the few remaining parts of the historic medieval village. The surrounding street pattern radiates from this open area. Larger green spaces such as South Norwood Country Park and South Norwood Lake are located along the northern edge and form a boundary between this Place and neighbouring boroughs. The small green open spaces are scattered throughout South Norwood and Woodside.

11.243 The South Norwood Conservation Area predominantly consists of an 'Urban Shopping Area' character mixed with 'Terraced Houses And Cottages'. Following the development of railway station, the district centre grew quickly during Victorian times resulting in fine buildings on the High Street and grand residences at its perimeter. The Grade II Listed Stanley Halls is one of the area's most significant historic assets.

11.244 The Portland Road Terraces, Portland Road Mission Hall and The Market Parade Local Heritage Areas have an 'Urban Shopping Area' character. These areas contain distinctive collections of mid-19th to early 20th century shopping parades, with bespoke Arts and Crafts and gothic inspired features that record the gradual historic development of the area.

11.245 Ingatestone Road Local Heritage Area has a 'Terraced Houses And Cottages' character. It represents a fine example of high density Edwardian development with unique features such as balconies with ornate ironwork, exposed red brick cladding with elaborate white stucco decorations.

Policy DM47: South Norwood and Woodside

DM47.1 Along the section of Portland Road between the South Norwood Conservation Area and Watcombe Road, to facilitate growth and strengthen the edge of the South Norwood District Centre proposals should:

  1. Relate to the predominant character in adjacent residential areas;
  2. Complement the existing predominant height up to a maximum height of 3 storeys with accommodation in roof space;
  3. Incorporate main pedestrian entrances onto Portland Road; and
  4. Maintain the rhythm and size of ground floor windows and doors.

 

DM47.2 Along the section of Portland Road between Watcombe Road and Woodside Avenue, to create a cohesive sense of place in this area, proposals should complement the existing predominant building heights of 2 storeys up to a maximum of 3 storeys.

DM47.3 Within South Norwood and Woodside allocate sites for development as set out in Table 11.15.

 

How the policy works

11.246 The areas in which Policies DM47.1 and DM47.2 apply are shown on the Policies Map.

Section of Portland Road between the South Norwood Conservation Area and Watcombe Road

11.247 Portland Road links South Norwood District Centre with Woodside Green. This street has a predominant 'Urban Shopping Area' character that has recently seen significant change which has resulted in the number of unsympathetic conversions from shops to residential use and a reduction of commercial uses.

11.248 To facilitate growth, strengthen definition of the edge of the District Centre and manage conversions a Place-specific development management policy is required.

Section of Portland Road between Watcombe Road and Woodside Avenue

11.249 The character of the area consists of small 'Urban Shopping Areas' and 'Institutions With Associated Grounds' interlaced with 'Medium Rise Blocks With Associated Grounds'. These character areas are surrounded by 'Terraced Houses And Cottages'.

11.250 A Place-specific development management policy is required to create a cohesive sense of place.

Allocating land for development

11.251 Table 11.15 below sets out the proposed use on specific sites in South Norwood and Woodside. The location and boundary of each detailed proposal can be found on the Policies Map and further details including indicative phasing and indicative number of homes (if applicable) can be found in Appendix 7.

Table 11.15 Proposals for uses of land of specific sites in South Norwood and Woodside

Ref no

Site name

Proposed use

97

24 Station Road

Residential development with a retail unit

486

Land and car park at rear of The Beehive Public House, 45A Woodside Green

Residential development

 

Thornton Heath

Vision, opportunities, constraints and change up to 2036

Vision

11.252 Thornton Heath's District Centre will be a mix of homes, community and cultural facilities reflecting the local diversity of the population and a range of retailing including many independent shops. The Local Centres at Thornton Heath Pond and Beulah Road will continue to have a strong evening economy. Brigstock Road Neighbourhood Centre will be supporting the existing and future community with services and facilities beyond a retail function. The District Centre will be firmly connected with Green Grid links that follow the Norbury Brook through Thornton Heath Recreation Ground together with further green links to Grangewood Park and west onto Mitcham Common. The Place will share in the borough's improving prosperity.

Homes

11.253 Moderate residential growth with some opportunity for windfall sites, limited infilling, and dispersed integration of new homes will respect existing residential character and local distinctiveness.

Employment, Skills and Community Facilities

11.254 Croydon University Hospital will evolve and, as the borough's principal health centre, will remain Thornton Heath's largest employer. The District and Local Centres will continue to support the community, providing employment and services. Community facilities will be encouraged to locate in close proximity.

Character, Heritage and Design

11.255 Heritage assets and landmarks will be protected and enhanced and the Place will be improved with high quality new development that respects the local character and distinctiveness, referring to the Borough Character Appraisal to inform design quality. Public realm improvements will primarily be focussed on the District and Local Centres with any buildings and conversions of a high standard of design to ensure the character of the Centres are respected.

Environment and Climate Change

11.256 Development will be directed away from the functional flood plain of the Norbury Brook. Development in flood zones will be guided by the policies of the Plan to reduce flood risk.

Green Grid and Open Space

11.257 To improve access to nature and the quality of the local open spaces, opportunities to de-culvert Norbury Brook in Thornton Heath Recreation Ground will be considered as part of a parks improvement project, but will need to be assessed against the need to provide space for sport and recreation. A Green Grid link with green spaces along the Norbury Brook will be established where possible. Way finding and improvements to the Local Historic Grangewood Park and Whitehorse Meadow will help to encourage more use of existing green spaces.

Transport

11.258 Cycling to Thornton Heath railway station will be more attractive with additional and better quality cycle facilities provided where possible. The tram system in Croydon will be further supported by promoting a new line to Streatham, Brixton and Tooting following the London Road through the Local Centre. The community will enjoy better quality, more frequent and more reliable bus services connecting with Croydon Metropolitan Centre. Travel plans will look to ease congestion at peak times by encouraging walking, cycling or public transport especially for school journeys.

Figure 11.16 Thornton Heath

Figure 11.16 Thornton Heath

General character

11.259 Thornton Heath is a densely built up settlement, with District and Local Centres that are spatially clearly defined.

11.260 The Place has a predominantly residential character consisting of 'Terraced Houses And Cottages' with a number of Edwardian and Victorian parks interlaced within the urban fabric.

11.261 The Thornton Heath High Street Local Heritage Area has an 'Urban Shopping Area' character. It contains distinctive classical Georgian, perpendicular and Queen Anne architectural styles dating from late 19th to 20th century with a wide range of well-preserved highly decorative historic features.

Policy DM48: Thornton Heath

DM48.1 Within the Thornton Heath District Centre and its environs, to ensure a balance is struck between strengthening and enhancing the character and enabling growth, proposals should:

  1. Complement the existing predominant building heights of 3 storeys up to a maximum of 4 storeys except in the vicinity of Thornton Heath railway station where any tall or large buildings proposed should not exceed 9 storeys;
  2. Retain the continuity of ground floor active frontages and allow flexibility at first floor and above for mixed use;
  3. Promote the expansion and enhancement of the shared public realm within the curtilage of the development;
  4. Ensure that the setting of Thornton Heath's local landmark, the Clock Tower, is respected; and
  5. Incorporate red multi-stock brick as the predominant facing material.

 

DM48.2 Within the Thornton Heath Pond Local Centre and its environs, to ensure a balance is struck between strengthening and enhancing the character and facilitating growth, proposals should:

  1. Ensure building lines and frontages positively reference and respond to the form of the Thornton Heath Pond junction;
  2. Incorporate red multi-stock brick as the predominant facing material;
  3. Retain the extent and enhance the quality of the existing public realm;
  4. Complement the existing predominant building heights of 3 storeys up to a maximum of 6 storeys; and
  5. Ensure transitions between buildings of different sizes create sense of continuity at the street level.

 

DM48.3 Within Thornton Heath allocate sites for development as set out in Table 11.16.

 

How the policy works

11.262 The areas in which these Policies DM48.1 and DM48.2 apply are shown on the Policies Map.

Thornton Heath District Centre and environs

11.263 The character of Thornton High Street is defined by elements such as red multi-stock brick with white detailing around windows, a consistent scale of three storey buildings with active frontages and strong tree lines and the local landmark clock tower.

11.264 The character around the railway station is less consistent changing from smaller scale buildings (up to three storeys) with narrow footways to tall and large buildings (up to nine storeys) with wider footways. The building lines within this area step back and forward resulting in inconsistent street frontages.

11.265 There are opportunities for growth within this area. To facilitate growth, manage spatial quality and enhance and strengthen the character of the District Centre a Place-specific development management policy is required.

Thornton Pond Local Centre and environs

11.266 The edge of the Thornton Pond Local Centre is beginning to lose its separate identity and sense of place. This could result in the Local Centre being absorbed into the homogenous urban form of the London Road.

11.267 Densities in areas around of Thornton Pond Local Centre are beginning to increase. A cohesive approach needs to be taken to ensure that edge of the Local Centre remains well defined and that the Local Centre has a distinct sense of place.

Allocating land for development

11.268 Table 11.16 below sets out the proposed use on specific sites in Thornton Heath. The location and boundary of each detailed proposal can be found on the Policies Map and further details including indicative phasing and indicative number of homes (if applicable) can be found in Appendix 7.

Table 11.16 Proposals for uses of land of specific sites in Thornton Heath

Ref no

Site name

Proposed use

115

Cheriton House, 20 Chipstead Avenue

Residential redevelopment

129

843 London Road

Primary school

136

Supermarket, car park, 54 Brigstock Road

Mixed use of residential, retail along Brigstock Road, and employment use

248

18-28 Thornton Road

Residential development

286

35-47 Osborne Road

Residential development

295

2 Zion Place

Residential development

326

Ambassador House, 3-17 Brigstock Road

Mixed use conversion comprising residential, retail and community facilities

400

Day Lewis House, 324-338 Bensham Lane

Residential redevelopment

407

797 London Road

Conversion or redevelopment to residential use

468

Grass area adjacent to, 55 Pawsons Road

Residential development

499

Croydon University Hospital Site, London Road

Consolidation of the hospital uses on a smaller area of the site with enabling residential development on remaining part subject to there being no loss of services provided by the hospital in terms of both quantity and quality

 

Waddon

Vision, opportunities, constraints and change up to 2036

Vision

11.269 Waddon will comprise both a growing residential community and a principle industrial location. Waddon Road/Abbey Road Neighbourhood Centre will be supporting the existing and future community with services and facilities beyond a retail function. It will, therefore, remain central to the borough's economic prosperity including continuing employment, inward investment, training and innovation. Waddon will share in the borough's improving prosperity and retain its high levels of accessibility, both for the residents and industrial and commercial traffic. Simultaneously the area will benefit from improved community provision for walking and cycling routes with an expanded Green Grid network connecting the Wandle Valley Regional Park with Croydon Metropolitan Centre. The retail areas along Purley Way, A23, will evolve into a series of interconnected mixed-use developments.

Homes

11.270 An area of major new high quality residential development based on available land will be concentrated on Purley Way, and a possible Local Centre at Five Ways. Residential development will respect the existing residential character and local distinctiveness.

Employment, Skills and Community Facilities

11.271 Purley Way, a Strategic Industrial Location, and the industrial heartland of the borough, will remain an important centre of employment activity. The borough will continue to invest in community facilities such as the Waylands Leisure Centre, and education and training facilities, to meet the needs of the existing and new population.

Character, Heritage and Design

11.272 New development will respect the existing local character and distinctiveness of Waddon referring to the Borough Character Appraisal to inform design quality. Opportunities for public realm improvements will focus on Five Ways, where a possible Local Centre could be located. Waddon's heritage assets, including Croydon Airport House and the classic view of Croydon from the Purley Way playing fields, will be protected. The Local Historic parks in the area will be retained with new links provided where possible to incorporate them into the Green Grid network.

Environment and Climate Change

11.273 The River Wandle will continue to be de-culverted where possible to create a more natural environment whilst encouraging biodiversity. Development that does take place in the flood zones will be guided by the policies of the Plan to reduce flood risk.

Green Grid and Open Space

11.274 Improved connections to the Croydon Metropolitan Centre and Wandle Valley Regional Park via Wandle Park and Waddon Ponds will be sought, improving and expanding the Green Grid to promote strategic east/west and north/south links.

Transport

11.275 Opportunities to improve the functioning of the A23 and junction improvements at Five Ways will be taken. To encourage walking and cycling, high quality connections within an attractive environment will be sought to reduce the severance effect of the Purley Way road, railway and tram lines. Waddon will benefit from improved tram services with investment in tram stock and more frequent services. As the attraction of the Croydon Metropolitan Centre increases, the quality, capacity and reliability of bus services connecting to it will be improved. Travel plans will look to ease congestion at peak times by encouraging walking, cycling or public transport especially for school journeys.

Figure 11.17 Waddon

Figure 11.17 Waddon

General character

11.276 Waddon has a fragmented character which consists of Retail Estates and Business and Leisure Parks and Industrial Estates along Purley Way, Local Authority Built Housing with Public Realm' on the Waddon Estate, the large green open spaces of Duppas Hill, Wandle Park, Purley Way Playing Field, Roundshaw and the former international airport, WWI RFC and WWII RAF airfield. The local character is most consistent within the centre and becomes more inconsistent towards the northern and eastern edges of Waddon.

11.277 Located on east edge of Waddon, The Waldrons Conservation Area, one of Croydon's first Conservation Areas, has a residential character of 'Large Houses On Relatively Small Plots'. The central focus of the area are the fine Victorian houses around the Waldons and a number of large high quality buildings on Bramley Hill and Bramley Close.

Policy DM49: Waddon

DM49.1 To enable development opportunities including public realm improvements to be undertaken in a cohesive and coordinated manner, a masterplan with elements of design code will be considered for the area within Waddon's potential new Local Centre.

DM49.2 Within Waddon allocate sites for development as set out in Table 11.17.

 

How the policy works

Waddon's potential new Local Centre

11.278 The area in which DM49.1 applies is shown on the Policies Map.

11.279 The proposed new Local Centre and environs has a mix of conflicting uses. This has resulted in insensitive transitions between character areas. Additionally the area lacks a sense of place and does not function as a destination for residents, despite being well served by public transport, therefore a Place-specific development management policy is required.

11.280 Waddon's potential to accommodate significant growth may lead to the designation of a new Local Centre. This opportunity provides additional impetus to ensure a balance is struck between retaining Waddon's sense of place while strengthening and enhancing the positive elements of Waddon's character. Additionally there is a need to create opportunities to reduce the dominant effect of the Purley Way and Fiveways road infrastructure and use the full potential of Waddon station as a catalyst for growth.

11.281 Due to the complexity of these issues and the number of development opportunities in Waddon's potential Local Centre, a detailed masterplan would help coordinate development within this area is undertaken in a coordinated and cohesive way while retaining Waddon's sense of place.

Allocating land for development

11.282 Table 11.17 below sets out the proposed use on specific sites in Waddon. The location and boundary of each detailed proposal can be found on the Policies Map and further details including indicative phasing and indicative number of homes (if applicable) can be found in Appendix 7.

Table 11.17 Proposals for uses of land of specific sites in Waddon

Ref no

Site name

Proposed use

11

Croydon Garden Centre, 89 Waddon Way

Residential development

16

Heath Clark, Stafford Road

Secondary School and residential development subject to access from Stafford Road

25

Morrisons Supermarket, 500 Purley Way

Redevelopment of a mix of residential, retail, commercial and community uses to form the basis of a new residential community. It is recommended that basements are not considered at this site. Further ground investigations would be required at this site to confirm the the likelihood of groundwater occurrence.

48

294-330 Purley Way

Mixed use development comprising retail store, commercial space and residential units

301

Sea Cadet Training Centre, 34 The Waldrons

Residential use

316

PC World, 2 Trojan Way

Redevelopment of this area to a mixture of residential, retail and commercial use, healthcare facility (if required by the NHS) and community uses to form the basis of a new residential community

332

Superstores, Drury Crescent

Redevelopment of this area to a mixture of residential, retail, healthcare facility (if required by the NHS) and community uses to form the basis of a new residential community

349

Harveys Furnishing Group Ltd, 230-250 Purley Way

Redevelopment of this area to a mixture of residential, retail and commercial use, healthcare facility (if required by the NHS) and community uses to form the basis of a new residential community. As the site is partly within a Flood Zone 3 it will be subject to the Sequential Test as part of the Strategic Flood Risk Assessment.

350

Wing Yip, 544 Purley Way

Redevelopment of a mix of residential, retail, commercial and community uses to form the basis of a new residential community

351

Furniture Village, 222 Purley Way

Redevelopment of this area to a mixture of residential, retail, healthcare facility (if required by NHS) and community uses to form the basis of a new residential community

355

Decathlon, 2 Trafaglar Way

Redevelopment of this area to a mixture of residential, retail, healthcare facility (if required by the NHS) and community uses to form the basis of a new residential community

430

Grafton Quarter, Grafton Road

Creative and Cultural Industries Enterprise Centre and residential development

946

Stubbs Mead depot, Factory Lane

Mixed residential and employment (industry and warehousing)



1 These buildings have few or no blank facades. At ground floor the buildings contain uses that frame the street or space and active upper floors with little or no obscure or frosted glazing. Active frontages encourage visual and/or physical interaction between the private uses inside and the public uses outside. Visual interaction is achieved by creating views or glimpses through windows, projecting bays, balconies and doors into or out of a building. Physical interaction encourages people to come into a building or has indoor uses that spill out onto the street.

2 Grain also called urban grain. It describes the pattern of the arrangement and size of buildings within a settlement and the degree by which an area's pattern of streets-blocks and junctions are respectively small and frequent (fine grain) or large and infrequent (course grain).

3 As defined in the Croydon Opportunity Area Planning Framework, pg 167



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