Planning for growth

4.1 The overall approach of the BDP is to support the continued renaissance of Birmingham which will see the City plan for significant new development to meet the needs of its growing population and ensure that it builds a prosperous economy for the future.

Overall levels of growth

Introduction

4.2 Over the period to 2031 the City faces new challenges and opportunities. Significant levels of housing, employment, office and retail development will be planned for, along with the supporting infrastructure and environmental enhancements.

Why we have taken this approach

4.3 One of the most significant challenges the City faces is the growth in its population and the resultant pressures this places on services, jobs and infrastructure.

4.4 The Office of National Statistics (ONS) projections (2012) indicate that by 2031 Birmingham's population will rise by 156,000 and the DCLG 2012-based household projections indicate that this will result in an increase of 86,000 households between 2011 and 2031.

4.5 To meet the needs of this growing population and ensure the City capitalises on its status and past investment the BDP seeks to plan for these significant levels of growth in the most sustainable way.

4.6 In the case of housing the City Council has sought to maximise the level of housing delivery within the built-up area of the City. However, it is not possible to achieve the levels of new housing development which would be required to meet this need within the City boundary. This reflects the fact that the land supply within the City is limited, even when Green Belt development options are considered. To meet the rest of Birmingham's housing need, options outside the City's boundaries will need to be explored.

Policy PG1 Overall levels of growth

Over the Plan period significant levels of housing, employment, office and retail development will be planned for and provided along with supporting infrastucture and environmental enhancements.

  • 51,100 additional homes.
  • 2 Regional Investment Sites of 20 and 25 ha and a 71 ha employment site at Peddimore.
  • A minimum 5 year reservoir of 96 ha of land for employment use.
  • About 350,000 sq.m. gross of comparison retail floorspace by 2026.
  • A minimum of 745,000 sq.m. gross of office floorspace in the network of centres primarily focussed on the City Centre.
  • New waste facilities to increase recycling and disposal capacity and minimise the amount of waste sent directly to landfill.

Birmingham's objectively assessed housing need for the period 2011 to 2031 is 89,000 additional homes, including about 33,800 affordable dwellings. It is not possible to deliver all of this additional housing within the City boundary. The City Council will continue to work actively with neighbouring Councils through the Duty to Co-operate to ensure that appropriate provision is made elsewhere within the Greater Birmingham Housing Market Area to meet the shortfall of 37,900 homes, including about 14,400 affordable dwellings, within the Plan period. Policy TP48 provides further details on this.

Implementation

  Local/ National Funding Partnerships CPO CIL/
Section 106
Planning Management Other Local Plan/
SPD/Regeneration
Framework
Policy PG1

4.7 The City Council will seek to work collaboratively with neighbouring authorities to secure the development of further homes to contribute toward meeting Birmingham's housing requirement over the period to 2031. This will focus on the Greater Birmingham Housing Market Area (HMA), which comprises, in addition to Birmingham itself, The Black Country, Bromsgrove, Redditch, Solihull, North Warwickshire, Tamworth, Lichfield, Cannock Chase, South Staffordshire and parts of Stratford-on-Avon. In 2014 the Greater Birmingham and Solihull Local Enterprise Partnership and the Black Country authorities jointly commissioned a study to assess future housing requirements within the two areas and to identify scenarios to provide for additional housing to meet any shortfall, including any unmet needs within Birmingham. The study area covers the majority of the Greater Birmingham HMA. The final phase of the study, together with additional work in relation to employment and sustainability, will provide a basis for a strategy to be agreed to accommodate additional housing provision to meet the shortfall arising in Birmingham and any other shortfalls within the study area. In the case of the Greater Birmingham and Solihull LEP, this will be reflected in the LEP Spatial Plan for Growth. The outcome of this will then be taken forward through revisions to individual Local Plans, where this is necessary, to ensure that additional land is allocated for new housing.

4.8 In order to provide employment for the City's growing population and reduce existing levels of unemployment and worklessness an additional 100,000 jobs need to be created. The levels of employment land provision proposed aim to enable this to be achieved and are supported by the Employment Land and Office Targets Study and the Employment Land Study for Economic Zones and Key Sectors.

4.9 The proposed levels of comparison retail development are in line with the Birmingham Retail Need Assessment (BRNA) Update (2013) and support the City's position as one of the UK's top retail destinations. The retail provision will also allow the network of centres to thrive serving their local communities.

4.10 The BRNA update (2013) provides specific retail requirements to 2026, however beyond this period and upto 2031 the figures identified are indicative reflecting the uncertainty surrounding longer term retail growth. Specific figures for post 2026 will be subject to further study, to be undertaken at an appropriate time, later in the plan period.

Birmingham Airport

Birmingham Airport

Birmingham as an international city

Introduction

4.11 Birmingham's future prosperity and success is underpinned by its regional, national and international standing and reputation.

4.12 Since the 1980s Birmingham has seen significant change restructuring its economy, enhancing its environment and improving its national and international standing. Further diversification of the economy, new investment in infrastructure and continued environmental enhancements will be essential to ensure the City strengthens its position.

Policy PG2 Birmingham as an international city

Birmingham will be promoted as an international city supporting development, investment and other initiatives that raise the City’s profile and strengthen its position nationally and internationally.

Implementation

  Local/ National Funding Partnerships CPO CIL/
Section 106
Planning Management Other Local Plan/
SPD/Regeneration
Framework
Policy PG2

 

Why we have taken this approach

4.13 Birmingham is internationally renowned for its innovation and industry, its strong academic base and commercial activity. The City benefits from being at the heart of the UK's transport network, with direct access to international markets through proximity of Birmingham Airport. Proposals for HS2 will further enhance this position. This connectivity and economic foundation are major assets for the City, underpinning its position both nationally and internationally.

4.14 Major attractions such as the Bullring shopping centre, Cadbury World, the International Convention Centre and Symphony Hall and National Indoor Arena are vital to the City's attraction as a business and leisure tourism destination.

4.15 The City's cultural diversity is increasing, characterised by the hosting of a variety of sporting, community and cultural events city-wide, attracting people from throughout the West Midlands region and beyond. Cultural diversity is also promoted through the range and number of international students who attend the City's universities each year. Major plans for the future, outlined in Big City Culture 2010-2015, will continue to strengthen the City’s position and reinforce Birmingham as a key destination.

4.16 Schemes such as the redevelopment of New Street Station, the new Library of Birmingham, major regeneration at Longbridge and ongoing expansion at Birmingham Airport will be central to the City’s future success.

4.17 The continued economic restructuring will be supported by the six Economic Zones which provide a sectoral and spatial focus for investment in key growth sectors.

Brindleyplace

Brindleyplace

 

Place making

Introduction

4.18 Creating an economically successful, safe and healthy City where people choose to live and work will be underpinned by the successful delivery of well designed development and places.

Why we have taken this approach

4.19 The quality of development and the ability to create well designed places will be central to how Birmingham is perceived and functions as a City in the future. For the City to compete in the international arena and secure investment, attention needs to be focussed on the design, quality and function of places.

4.20 The existing character and context of Birmingham will be an intrinsic component and consideration for any new development. New development and reuse of existing buildings has a significant visual, amenity and psychological impact on the people who will use them. It is essential to ensure the creation of places that are fit for purpose, attractive and sustainable.

4.21 The form a development takes will depend on the context, character, assets and constraints of a site, which in turn will be affected4.21 The form a development takes will depend on the context, character, assets and constraints of a site, which in turn will be affected by its location within the City. Development will largely take place within the existing built up area, reusing land, buildings and spaces to best effect within a modern context. Further understanding of the context within which new development will take place will be provided by the Historic Landscape Characterisation Study which the City Council is undertaking in conjunction with English Heritage. by its location within the City. Development will largely take place within the existing built up area, reusing land, buildings and spaces to best effect within a modern context. Further understanding of the context within which new development will take place will be provided by the Historic Landscape Characterisation Study which the City Council is undertaking in conjunction with English Heritage.

4.22 This policy sets the scene for how development should be brought forward and further detail is provided through the relevant thematic policies which follow. SPDs that have or will be produced to guide future development provide detailed guidance and policy advice on matters of design.

Policy PG3 Place making

All new development will be expected to demonstrate high design quality, contributing to a strong sense of place. New development should:

  • Reinforce or create a positive sense of place and local distinctiveness, with design that responds to site conditions and the local area context, including heritage assets and appropriate use of innovation in design.
  • Create safe environments that design out crime and make provision for people with disabilities through carefully considered site layouts, designing buildings and open spaces that promote positive social interaction and natural surveillance.
  • Provide attractive environments that encourage people to move around by cycling and walking.
  • Ensure that private external spaces, streets and public spaces are attractive, functional, inclusive and able to be managed for the long term.
  • Take opportunities to make sustainable design integral to development, such as green infrastructure, sustainable drainage and energy generating features.
  • Support the creation of sustainable neighbourhoods (Policy TP27).
  • Make best use of existing buildings and efficient use of land in support of the overall development strategy.

Implementation

  Local/ National Funding Partnerships CPO CIL/
Section 106
Planning Management Other Local Plan/
SPD/Regeneration
Framework
Policy PG3    

Park Central

Park Central


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